Please take a moment to review Hachette Book Group's updated Privacy Policy: read the updated policy here.

Bury Her Deep

Bury Her Deep

Dear Alec,
Remember my engagement yesterday? The annual duty luncheon for the Reverend Mr Tait from which and whom I expected only boredom? I could hardly have been more wrong, Alec dear, and I am this minute packing to follow the Reverend home to his manse in Fife, there to attend a meeting of the Rural Womens’ Institute. Hardly a house party at which one would usually leap, I grant you, but not only is the man himself a perfect darling – imagine Father Christmas shaved clean and draped in tweed – but his parish, it seems, heaves with more violent passions than a Buenos Aires bordello. A stranger, you see, is roaming the night and pouncing on the ladies of the Rural. At least that’s the tale they’re telling and the one that Mr Tait told me, but since half the village think he’s a figment and he only ever strikes at the full moon, I cannot help but wonder if there’s something even odder going on . . .

Much love and remember me fondly if the dark stranger gets me,
Dandy xx

Catriona McPherson’s latest novel in the series, Dandy Gilver and a Spot of Toil and Trouble is now available for pre-order.
Read More

Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Crime & Mystery

On Sale: 19th January 2012

Price: £8.99

ISBN-13: 9781444740547

Reviews

McPherson is an exemplary crime writer, effortlessly balancing the driest wit with melodramatic suspense. Her range of reference is seriously literary, her research impeccable, and her exuberance with period detail utterly beguiling. And Dandy herself is wonderful: blundering bravely through this mad and murky tale with perfect aplomb and a drop-dead vocabulary, she is a lesson to us all.
<i>Scotsman</i>
'Barbara Pym meets Dan Brown . . . The strengths of BURY HER DEEP all derive from the voice of the narrator. Respectably married to the deeply conventional Hugh Gilver, Dandy is brisk, baffled, heroic, kindly, scandalised and above all very funny as she sleuths her way through the Scottish countryside.'
<i>Guardian</i>
McPherson is on to a winner with her 1920s society sleuth Dandy Gilver, who is the most engaging and ingenious crime-cracker I've met in ages. She is gauche but perceptive, married but unromantic (although there's a lovely frisson to her co-solver), sly but endearingly innocent. The period detail is accomplished and convincing, the crime is neatly convoluted and McPherson's prose bristles with clever asides under a lucid surface. I wouldn't be surprised if she is translated on to the small screen soon, and I can't wait for her next adventure.
<i>Scotland on Sunday</i> on AFTER THE ARMISTICE BALL
Compelling
<i>Publishers Weekly</i> starred review
'Dandy Gilver is a delightful heroine'
<i>My Weekly</i>