Related to: 'Gunning for Greatness: My Life'

Andrew Strauss

Andrew Strauss was born in 1977 and spent his early years in South Africa, Australia and England. He learned his game at Radley College and Durham University, and made his first-class debut for Middlesex in 1998 before becoming captain in 2002.Strauss wrote his name into the record books when he became only the second England batsman to score a century at Lord's on his Test debut, in 2004. He played in the 2005 Ashes victory and was appointed England captain in 2009. Under his captaincy, England regained the Ashes in 2009 and held on to them in 2010-11, the first series win on Australian soil for 24 years. In 2011, he led his country to the No. 1 spot in the ICC Test world rankings for the first time. After captaining England in 50 of his 100 Tests, he retired from all forms of cricket in 2012. He was awarded the OBE in 2011. Andrew Strauss is married with two children.

Bobby Robson

Bobby Robson was born in 1933 in the heart of the mining community in Sacrison, County Durham. Soon afterwards, his family moved to Langley Park, where Bobby's footballing career started, and where he became an apprentice electrician in the mines at the age of fifteen. In 1950, he joined Fulham, followed by West Bromwich Albion in 1956. He won twenty caps for England before embarking on a management career with Ipswich Town, which lasted for thirteen years. He left the club in 1982 to take up the position of England manager, and then coached in Holland, Portugal and Spain before taking over at Newcastle from 1999 until 2004.Bobby Robson was born in 1933 in the heart of the mining community in Sacrison, County Durham. Soon afterwards, his family moved to Langley Park, where Bobby's footballing career started, and where he became an apprentice electrician in the mines at the age of fifteen. In 1950, he joined Fulham, followed by West Bromwich Albion in 1956. He won twenty caps for England before embarking on a management career with Ipswich Town, which lasted for thirteen years. He left the club in 1982 to take up the position of England manager, and then coached in Holland, Portugal and Spain before taking over at Newcastle from 1999 until 2004.

Bryan Robson

Bryan Robson is widely remembered as a fearless and inspirational player for club and country. Robbo began his playing career at West Bromwich Albion and moved to Manchester United in 1981. The following year he became captain of United and England. In total he played in three World Cups and won 90 caps for England, 65 of them as captain.

Clive Woodward

Clive Woodward was born in 1954. He was educated at HMS Conway in Anglesey and Loughborough University. He played rugby for Leicester, England and the Lions, and Manley in Australia. During his impressive business career Clive Woodward successfully coached Henley RFC, London Irish and Bath before being appointed the first National England coach. He memorably led the England rugby team to World Cup victory in 2003. He lives in Berkshire with his wife and three children.

Derek Pringle

Derek Pringle was born and raised in Nairobi, Kenya, where he first learnt to play cricket on matting pitches. He attended St Mary's School Nairobi then Felsted School in Essex before reading Geography and Land Economy at Cambridge, where he captained the University at cricket and won three Blues. While still an undergraduate he was selected to play Test cricket for England in 1982, a feat achieved previously by Ted Dexter, 24 years earlier. He also appeared, briefly, in the Oscar-winning film "Chariots of Fire," as Cambridge's vice-captain of athletics.He played 30 Tests and 44 One-day Internationals for England appearing in two World Cups, one as a losing finalist in 1992. His cricket career at Essex, which spanned 15 years, included five County Championship titles, three John Player League titles, a NatWest Trophy and countless friendships. He retired from the game in 1993.A second career, as a journalist, saw him appointed cricket correspondent for The Independent then The Telegraph, a role he fulfilled until 2014. He now works as a freelance writer. His hobbies include photography and collecting vinyl records of which he has several thousand - the latter perhaps explaining why he has never married. He has a son whose musical tastes he is trying to shape. He lives in Cambridge.

Graeme Swann

Graeme Swann is a former international cricketer for England. He was primarily a right-arm offspinner, and also a capable late-order batsman with four first-class centuries, and often fielded at slip. After initially playing for his home county Northamptonshire, for whom he made his debut in 1997, he moved to Nottinghamshire in 2005. He made his debut for England in 2000 but didn't play again until 2008 when he became an essential part of the team in all formats. In 2011 he was part of the team that claimed the number one world Test ranking spot. Graeme was involved in three Ashes tours, winning the Ashes in 2009 and 2011, he retired from all formats during the 2013 Ashes series. Since retirement Graeme has made the transition into commentary and is a summariser on Test Match Special and BT Sport cricket coverage.

Henry Blofeld

Henry began writing about cricket, for The Times, in May 1962 and in 1972 he started his long career as a commentator with the BBC's Test Match Special. During his career he has written for numerous papers and broadcast for both radio and television for many networks around the world especially in Australia and New Zealand. Between 1991 and 1993 he joined Sky Television before returning to Test Match Special after the death of Brian Johnston early in 1994. Since 2002 Henry Blofeld has performed in his humorous one-man show in theatres all round the country, and later he teamed up with his former TMS producer, Peter Baxter, for more than 250 two-man shows. His current two-man show team-mate is former England off spinner, Graeme Swann.

Jimmy Hill

Jimmy Hill began his career as a footballer with Brentford and Fulham. Following stints at management level, he was Chairman of the PFA. He was later Head of Sport at LWT for five years, after which he moved to the BBC.

Joe Root

Joe Root is a product of Sheffield Collegiate, the same nursery that produced Michael Vaughan, while his patience and stubbornness at the crease had Geoffrey Boycott gushing that he reminded him of himself.The 2011 season proved to be a breakthrough season for Root as he made 1,013 runs at 36.17. His form earned him a call up to the England senior squad for their tour of India. He did not disappoint, marking his Test debut in Nagpur with 73 runs from 229 balls.Joe has become an increasingly prominent member of the England squad in all three formats of the game and in 2013 he continued his rapid international progress with a superb 71 as England defeated New Zealand by 140 runs in the first Test at Lord's. In the second Test, Joe hit a marvellous 104 to become the first Yorkshireman to score his maiden Test century at Headingley. He was subsequently named as player of the series as the home side clinched a 246-run second Test victory to win the series 2-0.Joe was promoted to opening batsman and played a prominent role as England secured their third successive Ashes victory in 2013. The highlight of his series came in the second Test, when he was named man of the match after scoring a sensational 180 at Lord's, becoming the youngest ever Englishman to do so at the home of cricket.After returning from injury he quickly scored two more Test centuries, one at Lord's against Sri Lanka where he finished with a career-best 200*.Joe scored an unbeaten 154 against India at Trent Bridge that helped England recover from 298-9 to post 496 as he and James Anderson shared a world record 10th wicket stand of 198 before scoring 149 not out in the fifth Test as his team secured a 3-1 series victory.There was yet another ton in the second Test against West Indies in April 2015, with an unbeaten 182 from 229 balls as England secured a nine-wicket win.The following month, Joe was named England Men's Player of the Year and celebrated with scores of 98 and 84 in England's first Test victory over New Zealand.Joe's performances in The 2015 Ashes Series led to him reaching the top of the ICC World batting rankings.

Jonathan Clegg

Jonathan Clegg is an editor for The Wall Street Journal, his work has also written for the Daily Telegraph, the Independent, and FourFourTwo magazine.

Joshua Robinson

Joshua Robinson is the European sports correspondent for The Wall Street Journal, and has written for the New York Times, the Washington Post and Sports Illustrated.

Lewis Moody

Lewis Moody was born in Ascot in 1978. Educated at Oakham School and later De Montford University, Moody was the then youngest league debutant for Leicester Tigers, aged 18 years and 94 days. After winning seven league championships with Leicester, Lewis moved to Bath Rugby in 2010. He made his debut for England in 2001, and was a key part of the team which won the World Cup in 2003 (after which Lewis was awarded the MBE) and reached the final in 2007. Lewis was named captain in 2010, and is now the most capped England flanker of all time. Lewis lives outside Bath with his wife, Annie and their two sons.

Mesut Özil

Mesut Ozil was born in 1988 to Turkish parents at Gelsenkirchen in what was then West Germany. An attacking midfielder, his professional career began with home-town team Schalke 04 and led him to Werder Bremen and Real Madrid before he joined Arsenal for a club-record £42.5m in 2013. His honours include FA Cup success with Arsenal, a Spanish title with Real and the German Cup at Bremen. A five-time Player of the Year in Germany, he made his debut for the national team aged 20 and was a member of their World Cup-winning side in 2014.

Michael Parkinson

Born in Yorkshire, Michael Parkinson left school at sixteen with the ambition to play cricket for Yorkshire and England and to write about cricket for the Manchester Guardian. Although, he didn't manage to fulfil the first half of his ambition, he has since become one of the most successful journalists of his generation. He wrote a sports column for The Sunday Times for fifteen years and has also written for the Telegraph. He is also a legendary TV and radio presenter - his long-running chat show Parkinson was hugely popular for many years.

Michael Vaughan

Michael Vaughan was born in Manchester in 1974. Michael began playing professional cricket at the age of seventeen and first captained the England Under-19 cricket team in 1993. He made his Test debut for England in 1999 against South Africa and in May the following year scored his first Test century against Pakistan. In 2002, Michael scored 900 runs in just seven Tests and was named PCA Player of the Year. Michael was appointed captain of England in 2003, the same year in which he was named Wisden Cricketer of the Year and reached the top of the world rankings. In 2005, Michael captained the team that reclaimed the Ashes in an historic series against Australia and was awarded the OBE. Injury prevented him from captaining the team that travelled to Australia the following year, but on his recovery Michael returned to the Test side and surpassed Peter May's record of twenty wins as England captain. His final total of twenty-six wins makes him the most successful Test captain of all time. Michael Vaughan resigned from the captaincy in 2008 and in June 2009 he retired from all cricket. Michael lives with his wife and two children in Derbyshire.

Mo Farah

MO FARAH was born in Mogadishu, Somalia in 1983. As a young child he spent time in Djibouti before moving to England at the age of eight. Mo initially struggled with the language barrier, but his PE teacher at Feltham Community College, Alan Watkinson, quickly spotted his potential as a runner and encouraged him to join Borough of Hounslow Athletics Club. After attending St Mary's Endurance Performance and Coaching Centre in Twickenham, Mo became a professional athlete. At the 2012 London Olympic Games he won gold in the 10,000m - Britain's first gold in this event. He followed this up with a stunning victory in the 5000m to become, in the words of Dave Moorcroft, 'the greatest male distance runner that Britain has ever seen.' Mo was appointed CBE in the Honours List in 2013. He lives in Portland, Oregon with his wife Tania, and their three daughters Rhianna, Aisha and Amani.

Monty Panesar

Monty Panesar only arrived on the international cricketing scene in March 2006, but his electric performances against India and in the Ashes series saw him catapulted to cult hero status in a matter of months, and widely rated as England's best spin bowler for 30 years.

Neal Bascomb

Neal Bascomb is the author of nine award-winning, national, and international bestselling adult books, including most recently the New York Times bestseller on the sabotage of the German atomic bomb program The Winter Fortress. He also chronicled the search for a Nazi war criminal in Hunting Eichmann and the story of Roger Bannister's four-minute-mile in The Perfect Mile. His work has been translated in over eighteen countries.

Paul Ferris

Paul Ferris was a teenage prodigy, becoming Newcastle United's youngest-ever player in 1982, only for injury to ensure his promise went unfulfilled. He later returned to the club as a physiotherapist before earning a Master's degree and beginning a successful quest to qualify as a barrister. But the lure of football was always strong and he went back for a third spell at Newcastle, as Head of the Medical Department, again working closely with a host of big-name players and managers. Paul also became a novelist and now runs a successful health and fitness business.

Phil Taylor

Phil Taylor is widely regarded as the best darts player of all time, having won more than 200 professional tournaments, including 81 major titles and a record 16 World Championships. No darts player has a winning record in matches against him.He has won the PDC Player of the Year award six times (2006, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2011 and 2012) and has twice been nominated for the BBC Sports Personality of the Year, in 2006 and 2010, finishing as runner-up in the latter. He was the first, and to date, the only person to hit two nine dart finishes in one match, in the 2010 Premier League Darts final against James Wade. He has hit a record ten televised nine-dart finishes and is ranked world number two in the PDC Order of Merit.