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Ingenious Pain

Ingenious Pain

The extraordinary prize-winning debut from Andrew Miller. Winner of the IMPAC Award and James Tait Black Memorial Prize.

At the dawn of the Enlightenment, James Dyer is born unable to feel pain. A source of wonder and scientific curiosity as a child, he rises through the ranks of Georgian society to become a brilliant surgeon. Yet as a human being he fails, for he can no more feel love and compassion than pain. Until, en route to St Petersburg to inoculate the Empress Catherine against smallpox, he meets his nemesis and saviour.
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Genre: Fiction & Related Items / Modern & Contemporary Fiction (post C 1945)

On Sale: 8th May 2006

Price: £6.59

ISBN-13: 9781848947955

Reviews

A really remarkable first novel, original, powerfully written . . . Miller's narrative is gripping and his imagination extraordinary.
<i>Sunday Telegraph</i>
Funny, tender and exhilarating. It is something very rare in modern fiction, a true work of art
Spectator
A wild adventure through 18th-century England and Russia, medicine, madness, landscape and weather, rendered in prose of consummate beauty.
<i>Independent </i> Books of the Year
Strange, unsettling, sad, beautiful, and profound
<i>Literary Review</i>
Astoundingly good
The Times
Astoundingly good . . . it shines like a beacon among the grey dross of much contemporary fiction
<i>The Times</i>
Dazzling . . . Miller tackles notions of mortality and humanity to brilliant effect . . . truly wonderful
<i>Evening Standard</i>
A really remarkable first novel ... Miller's narrative is gripping and his imagination extraordinary
Sunday Telegraph
A timeless and thought-provoking fable about human nature . . . It is something very rare in modern fiction, a true work of art.
<i>Spectator</i>
A dazzling debut
Observer
Exceptionally intelligent and elegant ... remarkable for its feeling and its humane sensibility
The Sunday Times
An extraordinary first novel
The New York Times Book Review