Bobby Robson - Farewell But Not Goodbye - Updated Edition - Hodder & Stoughton

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Farewell But Not Goodbye - Updated Edition

By Bobby Robson
Read by Bobby Robson

  • Downloadable audio file
  • £P.O.R.

Commemorative edition of the remarkable life story of a sporting legend, Sir Bobby Robson.

Sir Bobby Robson died on the morning of 31 July 2009. Revered in Newcastle and the North East, he was a man who enjoyed phenomenal popularity, and touched so many people with his sincerity and passion for the game of football. From his playing days with Fulham and West Brom in the 1950s and 60s, to his twenty England caps and his brilliant management career, Bobby Robson inspired generations of fans. However, Bobby's story is not just about these great achievements. In this book he provided a fascinating insight into his childhood and early adult years growing up in the North East, and his working life before football in the mines of Langley Park, where he went underground for a year and a half at the age of fifteen.

One of English football's most successful managers, Bobby witnessed some of the most historic sporting moments during his incredible career, including such epic incidents as the 'Hand of God' and Gazza's tears. He wrote of leading England through two World Cups and the agony of coming within a penalty kick of the 1990 World Cup final.

Bobby's story takes in many countries, many clubs and many of the world's most illustrious players. He inspired deep affection for the qualities that he always embodied: passion, humour, hard work and fair play. Bobby Robson's story is a rich and diverse one; this moving and entertaining autobiography celebrates the remarkable life of a sporting legend.

(p) 2005 Hodder & Stoughton

Biographical Notes

Bobby Robson was born in 1933 in the heart of the mining community in Sacrison, County Durham. Soon afterwards, his family moved to Langley Park, where Bobby's footballing career started, and where he became an apprentice electrician in the mines at the age of fifteen. In 1950, he joined Fulham, followed by West Bromwich Albion in 1956. He won twenty caps for England before embarking on a management career with Ipswich Town, which lasted for thirteen years. He left the club in 1982 to take up the position of England manager, and then coached in Holland, Portugal and Spain before taking over at Newcastle from 1999 until 2004.Bobby Robson was born in 1933 in the heart of the mining community in Sacrison, County Durham. Soon afterwards, his family moved to Langley Park, where Bobby's footballing career started, and where he became an apprentice electrician in the mines at the age of fifteen. In 1950, he joined Fulham, followed by West Bromwich Albion in 1956. He won twenty caps for England before embarking on a management career with Ipswich Town, which lasted for thirteen years. He left the club in 1982 to take up the position of England manager, and then coached in Holland, Portugal and Spain before taking over at Newcastle from 1999 until 2004.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781844563647
  • Publication date: 29 Jun 2006
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
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