Andrew Williams - The Interrogator - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781848542570
    • Publication date:06 Aug 2009

The Interrogator

By Andrew Williams

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

Shortlisted for the CWA/Ian Fleming Award, The Interrogator is a masterful spy story set in the darkest days of the Second World War. The Enigma Code has been broken - but what if German High Command can read our naval signals, too? For all readers of John le Carre and Robert Harris - 'Terrific... Robert Harris had better watch out' Daily Mail.

Shortlisted for the CWA/Ian Fleming Award, The Interrogator is a masterful spy story set in the darkest days of the Second World War. The Enigma Code has been broken - but what if German High Command can read our naval signals, too? For all readers of John le Carre and Robert Harris - 'Terrific... Robert Harris had better watch out' Daily Mail.

Spring, 1941. The armies of the Reich are masters of Europe. Britain stands alone, dependent on her battered navy for survival, while Hitler's submarines - his 'grey wolves' - prey on the Atlantic convoys that are the country's only lifeline.
Lieutenant Douglas Lindsay is amongst just a handful of men picked up when his ship is torpedoed. Unable to free himself from the memories of that night at sea, he becomes an interrogator with naval intelligence, questioning captured U-Boat crews. He is convinced the Germans have broken British naval codes, but he's a lone voice, a damaged outsider, and his superiors begin to wonder - can he really be trusted when so much is at stake?
As the Blitz reduces Britain's cities to rubble and losses at sea mount, Lindsay becomes increasingly isolated and desperate. No one will believe him, not even his lover, Mary Henderson, who works at the very heart of the intelligence establishment. Lindsay decides to risk all in one last throw of the dice, setting a trap for his prize captive - and nemisis - U-Boat Commander Jürgen Mohr, the man who sent his ship to its doom.

Biographical Notes

After studying English at Oxford University, Andrew Williams worked as a senior producer for the BBC's Panorama and Newsnight programmes, then wrote and directed history documentaries. He is the author of two bestselling non-fiction books: The Battle of the Atlantic and D-Day to Berlin. His three acclaimed novels - The Interrogator, which was shortlisted for the Ian Fleming Silver Dagger Award, To Kill a Tsar, shortlisted for the Ellis Peters Award and the Walter Scott Award, and most recently The Poison Tide, are all published by John Murray. Andrew Williams lives with his family in Edinburgh. You can find out more about Andrew and his writing at www.andrewwilliams.tv and www.johnmurrays.co.uk, and you can follow him on twitter at @AWilliamsWriter or on Facebook

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780719523816
  • Publication date: 06 Aug 2009
  • Page count: 400
  • Imprint: Hodder Paperbacks
'Andrew Williams's debut novel The Interrogator has a flair, grasp of detail, and strong characterisation that reminds me uncannily of Robert Harris's best-seller Enigma, and there's no higher praise . . . This is a terrific first novel. Harris had better watch out' — Daily Mail
'One of the most gripping books I have read for some time' — The Times
'The tensions within the intelligence community simmer excitingly ... his dialogue is energetic, and he is armed with a real passion for these events. Events are never absurd or melodramatic, and the characters are damaged, driven and fallible ... this is gripping stuff. Williams has put his knowledge to work, and any reader will emerge from this debut entertained and half-amazed at a terrific, mostly untold story' — Bill Greenwell, Independent
'Andrew Williams' The Interrogator is an exciting, pacy Second World War novel with a clever twist...' — Andrew Roberts, Daily Telegraph
'Introduces tension by lingering on the rough justice meted out by German prisoners of war' — Herald
'This atmospheric first novel makes good use of different viewpoints ... maintaining the excitement and sense of mystery even though the reader knows how the story must end' — Morning Star
'Not only is this a gripping thriller ... but (it) is confidently researched and cheekily written enough to include a cameo role for that real life Naval Intelligence officer of the day, a certain Ian Fleming.' — Shots
'An excellent job...this 375-page hardback provides one of the best reads I have enjoyed for a long time. Worth every penny' — Dover Express & Folkestone Herald
'An interesting slant on the war hero... this is a first-rate debut, highly recommended' — Bookseller
A 'ripping yarn' — Adelaide Advertiser (Australia)
'This is a terrific first novel with the best description I have ever read of the noise of the explosion that occurred when HMS Loyalty, on which I was serving, was torpedoed on 22nd August, 1944' — Driffield Leader
'A gripping thriller ... confidently researched and cheekily written' — Deadly Pleasures
The action in this story moves along at a good pace, and the dialogue and characters are believable — Nautical Magazine
'An interesting slant on the war hero ... this is a first rate debut, highly recommended' — Bookseller
'A gripping thriller ... confidently researched and cheekily written' — Deadly Pleasures
"Utterly convincing...atmospheric...He keeps this book involving, suspenseful and fascinating to the end, and it is a remarkable first novel" Review — Crime Time and Blogspot/ Michael Carlson
"Utterly convincing...atmospheric...He keeps this book involving, suspenseful and fascinating to the end, and it is a remarkable first novel" — Crime Time and Blogspot/Michael Carlson
'An interesting slant on the war hero ... this is a first rate debut, highly recommended' - — Bookseller
'A gripping thriller ... confidently researched and cheekily written' — Deadly Pleasures
'This complex and well-written book offers a fascinating insight into a little-explored area of the conduct of war' — Lincolnshire Echo
Pride of place for the best debut of the year goes to Andrew Williams for his World War II thriller......it evokes the war-time world of code-breaking and naval intelligenc ewith exceptional flair.... For a first novel, this is a stand out performance, and marks Williams out as a star of the future...' — Daily Mail
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A tense story of a spy undercover during the First World War, Andrew Williams recreates the early years of the Secret Service as evocatively as anything by John le Carré or Robert Harris. The Poison Tide is the first in a series of novels set in that world and 'possesses a richness of characterisation and intelligence that few thrillers can match' Sunday Times. 1915. German guns are on their way to Ireland. The British government faces its worst nightmare; insurrection at home while it struggles with bloody stalemate on the Western Front. British spy Sebastian Wolff, of the new Secret Service Bureau, is given the task of hunting down its enemies: one a traitor reviled by the society that honoured him as a national hero; the other a German-American doctor who, instead of healing the sick, is developing a terrifying new weapon that he will use in the country of his birth. Wolff's mission will take him undercover into the corridors of power in Berlin, then across the Atlantic in a race against time to prevent the destruction of the ships and supplies Britain so desperately needs to stave off defeat.

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D-Day To Berlin

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Nightfall, 6 June 1944. D-Day is over and the Allies have carved a tenuous foothold in 'Fortress Europe'. The future of Europe hangs in the balance as Hitler's formidable SS Panzer troops threaten to drive them back into the sea. D-DAY TO BERLIN is the remarkable story of the Allied struggle for survival - the battle from the beaches of Normandy to the heart of Hitler's Reich and ultimate victory just eleven months later. The campaign to free Europe from Nazi oppression through the collective operations from D-DAY TO BERLIN mark one of the greatest ever military offensives. The Allies overcame initial setbacks to inflict a devastating defeat on Hitler's crack divisions in France - a victory that was threatened just months later in the bitter winter fighting of the Battle of the Bulge. The final crossing of the Rhine and the advance into Germany changed the course of European history forever. In D-DAY TO BERLIN we meet men and women from both sides - British, American and German soldiers - whose bravery and endurance made the final push through Europe the defining drama of the Second World War.

Alexandra Raife

Alexandra Raife has lived abroad in many countries and worked at a variety of jobs, including a six-year commission in the RAF and many years co-running a Highland hotel.

Ashley Hay

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Christine Marion Fraser

Christine Marion Fraser was one of Scotland's best-selling authors, outselling even Catherine Cookson, with world-wide readership and translations into many foreign languages. She was the author of the much-loved Rhanna series. Second youngest of a large family, she soon learned independence during childhood years spent in the post-war Govan district of Glasgow. Chris lived in Argyll with her husband. She died on 22nd November 2002.

Ciara Geraghty

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Daniel Woodrell

Daniel Woodrell was born in the Missouri Ozarks, where he still lives. He left school and enlisted in the Marines the week he turned seventeen, and received his BA at the age of twenty-seven. He also has an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop. He is the author of eight novels including Winter's Bone, the film of which was nominated for four Oscars in 2011, Woe to Live On, the basis for the film Ride with the Devil directed by Ang Lee, and Tomato Red, which won the PEN West Award for fiction in 1999. Five of his novels have been selected as New York Times Notable Books of the year. His most recent novel was The Maid's Version, published by Sceptre in 2013.

Declan Hughes

Declan Hughes was born in Dublin, where he lives with his wife and daughters. He has worked as a playwright and director and co-founded the award-winning Rough Magic Theatre Company, where he was artistic director and writer-in-residence. The first in the series of Ed Loy mysteries, The Wrong Kind of Blood, won the Shamus Award for best first novel and the third, The Dying Breed, was nominated for the prestigious Edgar Allan Poe award for best novel.

Elizabeth Goudge

Elizabeth de Beauchamp Goudge was born on April 24th 1900 in Wells, Somerset, where her father was Principal of Wells Theological College. Although she had privately intended writing as a career, her parents insisted she taught handicrafts in Oxford. She began writing in her spare time and her first novel ISLAND MAGIC, set in Guernsey, was a great success here and in America. GREEN DOLPHIN COUNTRY (1944) projected her to fame, netting a Literary Guild Award and a special prize of £30,000 from Louis B. Mayer of MGM before being filmed.In her later years Elizabeth Goudge settled in Henley-on-Thames. She died on April 1st, 1984.

Elizabeth H. Winthrop

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Emily Giffin

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