John Betjeman, Stephen Games, and John Betjeman - Betjeman's England - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781848543805
    • Publication date:04 Feb 2010

Betjeman's England

By John Betjeman, Stephen Games, and John Betjeman

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

An affectionate and unabashed celebration of Englishness from one of the nation's most popular poets

For more than half a century, Betjeman's writings have awakened readers to the intimacy of English places - from the smell of gaslight in suburban churches, to the hissing of backwash on a shingle beach. Betjeman is England's greatest topologist: whether he's talking about a townhall or a teashop, he gets to the nub of what makes unexpected places unique. This new collection of his writings, arranged geographically, offers an essential gazetteer to the physical landmarks of Betjeman Country.

A new addition to the popular series of Betjeman anthologies, following on from Trains and Buttered Toast and Tennis Whites and Teacakes, this is a treasure trove for any Betjeman fan and for anyone with a love for the rare, curious and unique details of English life.

Biographical Notes

John Betjeman was born in 1906 and educated at Magdalen College, Oxford. His gave his first radio talk in 1932; future appearances made him into a national celebrity. He was knighted in 1969 and became poet laureate in 1972. He died in 1984.

Stephen Games writes about in architecture and language. He was educated at Magdalene College, Cambridge, made documentaries for BBC Radio 3 and has worked for the Independent, the Guardian, the Los Angeles Times, and was deputy editor of the RIBA Journal. In 2002, he edited the radio talks of Nikolaus Pevsner.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781848540927
  • Publication date: 04 Feb 2010
  • Page count: 320
  • Imprint: John Murray
'Betjeman chronicles the English way of life in exquisite, affectionate and often hilarious detail' — Independent
'Betjeman was an original and a star' — Daily Mail
'Remarkable collection ... this is a real treat for any fan of Betjeman, and a testament to Games's remarkable research and reconstruction' — Sunday Telegraph
'The extracts published here capture the spirit and charm of the broadcasts and the places he explored for the camera years ago that can still be enjoyed today' — Daily Express
'Games has supplied an informative introduction ... Betjeman misxing charm and intimacy' — Daily Express
Betjeman combines sly humour with a deep love of Englishness' — Spectator
'Striking package to match the previous collections in this series' — Bookseller
'Always thoughtful, always eloquent writing' — Robert Elms Podcast
'The real joy of this book is the chance to remember Betjeman's keen eye, sense of fun and turn of phrase' — Choice Magazine
'A new book out that proves a treasure house ... reader will, I'm sure, enjoy Betjeman's poems about his strolls through London ... an essential gazetteer to the attractive landmarks of dear old England of yesteryear' — Kent on Sunday
'A poetic imagination, humour, and fierce appreciation of the past are all in evidence here.' — Good Book Guide
'Nobody writes more affectionately about Englishness than John Betjeman.' — Driffield Leader
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