Simon Reid-Henry - Empire of Democracy - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473670587
    • Publication date:27 Jun 2019
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    • ISBN:9781473675605
    • Publication date:27 Jun 2019

Empire of Democracy

The Remaking of the West since the Cold War, 1971-2017

By Simon Reid-Henry

  • Hardback
  • £30.00

The first panoramic history of the Western world from the 1970s to the present day: Empire of Democracy is the story for those asking how we got to where we are.

Half a century ago, at the height of the Cold War and amidst a world economic crisis, the Western democracies were forced to undergo a profound transformation. Against what some saw as a full-scale "crisis of democracy" - with race riots, anti-Vietnam marches and a wave of worker discontent sowing crisis from one nation to the next - a new political-economic order was devised and the postwar social contract was torn up and written anew.

In this epic narrative of the events that have shaped our own times, Simon Reid-Henry shows how liberal democracy, and Western history with it, was profoundly re-imagined when the postwar Golden Age ended. As the institutions of liberal rule were reinvented, a new generation of politicians emerged: Thatcher, Reagan, Mitterrand, Kohl. The late twentieth-century heyday they oversaw carried the Western democracies triumphantly to victory in the Cold War and into the economic boom of the 1990s. But equally it led them into the fiasco of Iraq, to the high drama of the financial crisis in 2007/8, and ultimately to the anti-liberal surge of our own times.

The present crisis of liberalism enjoins us to revisit these as yet unscripted decades. The era we have all been living through is closing out, democracy is turning on its axis once again. As this panoramic history poignantly reminds us, the choices we make going forward require us first to come to terms with where we have been.

Biographical Notes

Simon Reid-Henry is a writer and prize-winner scholar. Associate Professor at Queen Mary, University of London, he holds a joint position as a Senior Researcher at the Peace Research Institute, Oslo.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473670556
  • Publication date: 27 Jun 2019
  • Page count: 880
  • Imprint: John Murray
Brilliantly, Reid-Henry calls for the salvation of democracy from the choices of its own leaders - if it is to survive — Samuel Moyn, Yale University
Simon Reid-Henry has written a superbly informed and riveting historical analysis of our contemporary era, which opened in the 1970s and, as he brilliantly demonstrates, continues to transform the premises of Western democracies — Charles S. Maier, Harvard University
Praise for Fidel and Che — .
As exciting and readable as a Cold War thriller — The Times
Gripping . . . deeply impressive . . . rigorously sourced — Independent
A lucid, pulsating study . . . skilfully drawn — Economist
Absorbing — Sunday Times
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