Mick Herron - London Rules - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473657373
    • Publication date:01 Feb 2018
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London Rules

Jackson Lamb Thriller 5

By Mick Herron

  • Paperback
  • £8.99

The fifth Jackson Lamb novel from the 'new king of the spy thriller' (Mail on Sunday)

SHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA GOLD DAGGER AND IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER

'The UK's new spy master' Sunday Times

London Rules might not be written down, but everyone knows rule one.

Cover your arse.

Regent's Park's First Desk, Claude Whelan, is learning this the hard way. Tasked with protecting a beleaguered prime minister, he's facing attack from all directions himself: from the showboating MP who orchestrated the Brexit vote, and now has his sights set on Number Ten; from the showboat's wife, a tabloid columnist, who's crucifying Whelan in print; and especially from his own deputy, Lady Di Taverner, who's alert for Claude's every stumble.

Meanwhile, the country's being rocked by an apparently random string of terror attacks, and someone's trying to kill Roddy Ho.

Over at Slough House, the crew are struggling with personal problems: repressed grief, various addictions, retail paralysis, and the nagging suspicion that their newest colleague is a psychopath. But collectively, they're about to rediscover their greatest strength - that of making a bad situation much, much worse.

It's a good job Jackson Lamb knows the rules. Because those things aren't going to break themselves.

******

Praise for Mick Herron

'The new spy master' Evening Standard

'Herron is spy fiction's great humorist, mixing absurd situations with sparklingly funny dialogue and elegant, witty prose' The Times

'Herron draws his readers so fully into the world of Slough House that the incautious might find themselves slipping between the pages and transformed from reader to spook' Irish Times

Biographical Notes

Mick Herron's first Jackson Lamb novel, Slow Horses, was shortlisted for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger and picked as one of the best twenty spy novels of all time by the Daily Telegraph. The second, Dead Lions, won the 2013 CWA Goldsboro Gold Dagger. The third, Real Tigers, was shortlisted for the Theakston Old Peculier Crime Novel of the Year, and both the CWA Goldsboro Gold Dagger and the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger. The fourth, Spook Street, was shortlisted for the Gold Dagger and Theakston Old Peculier and won the Steel Dagger. London Rules is the fifth, and has been longlisted for the Gold and Steel Dagger.

Mick Herron was born in Newcastle upon Tyne, and now lives in Oxford.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473657403
  • Publication date: 09 Aug 2018
  • Page count: 352
  • Imprint: John Murray
The new spy master — Evening Standard
The new king of the spy thriller — Mail on Sunday
The best modern British spy series — Daily Express
Dazzingly inventive. Superbly orchestrated . . . Lamb - the most fascinating and irresistible thriller series hero to emerge since Jack Reacher — Sunday Times
He's been called the heir to Len Deighton - and Mick Herron's latest mordantly funny espionage novel only backs that up — Sunday Times
London Rules confirms Mick Herron as the greatest comic writer of spy fiction in the English language, and possibly all crime fiction — The Times
Le Carré looks sugar-coated next to the acid Slough House novels . . . as a master of wit, satire, insight and that very English trick of disguising heartfelt writing as detached irony before launching a surprise assault on the reader's emotions, Herron is difficult to overpraise — Daily Telegraph
Addictive . . . I cannot recommend these books strongly enough — Nick Lezard, The Spectator
The fifth instalment of the award-winning Jackson Lamb series is witty, sardonic and laugh-out-loud funny yet also thrilling and thought-provoking . . . Herron has often been compared with spy thriller greats John le Carré and Len Deighton but it is time he was recognised in his own right as the best thriller writer in Britain today. In a series that never lets its fans down, London Rules is the best instalment yet — Sunday Express, *****
It is, as ever, a joy to return to this world: there is a warm, wise, amused depth to Herron's writing, which shines a stark light on the atrocities he describes. He's also horribly funny — Observer
Superb new Jackson Lamb thriller — Irish Times
Mick Herron is the John le Carré of our generation — Val McDermid
This year's discoveries for me were the spy novels of Mick Herron . . . Herron's Jackson Lamb books are mesmerisingly good, combining the best double, triple and quadruple-crossing traditions of Len Deighton and early Le Carré with the mordant humour of Reginald Hill's Dalziel and Pascoe novels — Marcus Berkmann, Spectator Books of the Year
London Rules is well up to the high standard of its predecessors, with the usual mixture of jokes and jeopardy at Slough House, the place where MI5 careers go to die under the dubious auspices of the wonderfully repulsive Jackson Lamb — Guardian, Books of the Year 2018
Fortunately, Mick Herron seems to write a new Jackson Lamb novel every year. His latest in this series of wonderful and witty books about the more than eccentric head of a branch of MI5, London Rules, came out on time. I read the first four of these thrillers in a couple of weeks last year. The latest is well up to Herron's usual standards — Chris Patten, New Statesman Best Books of 2018
London Rules by Mick Herron is the latest - and so far the best - bulletin from that twilight home for burned-out spies by the Barbican, Slough House . . . If you haven't read Herron yet you should — Evening Standard, Best Crime Novels of 2018
This is modern British spy fiction at its brilliant best; taut, tense, quirky, funny and thrilling — Choice
Herron's comic brilliance should not overshadow the fact that his books are frequently thrilling, often thought-provoking, and sometimes moving and even inspiring. Reading one of Herron's worst books would be the highlight of my month and London Rules is one of his best — Sunday Express
London Rules takes the Jackson Lamb series to new levels of nerve-shredding tension, leavened as always with moments of eye-watering hilarity - often on the same page — Christopher Brookmyre
The great triumph of Mick Herron's Jackson Lamb books - apart from the sly wit, the clever plots and the characters - is his creation of a hilariously plausible, complete and utterly original intelligence world, in which cock-up always trumps conspiracy, the small-minded and rampantly egotistical rise to the top, and defeat is almost always snatched from the jaws of victory — M J Carter
Jackson Lamb is one of the most singularly offensive, cruel and heartless - but above all funny - fictional creations of recent times . . . Similar in the tones of Len Deighton, devoid of all glamour, grimly realistic and brutal and darkly hilarious, London Rules further burnishes Mick Herron's reputation as the finest spy novelist of his generation — Irish Examiner
London Rules may be the best Jackson Lamb thriller yet, and that's saying something, considering how brilliant the previous ones are — Mark Billingham
Sharper, funnier and more distorted than ever — Literary Review
Excellent espionage tale that is also very funny without becoming Carry On Le Carré — The Sun
Herron adeptly negotiates the rules of satire and the laws of libel to create fictional public figures who simultaneously hit more than one real-life bullseye...Stylistically, Herron's narrative voice swoops from the high to the low but it's the dialogue that zings: the screenwriters of the inevitable TV version won't have to change much... Herron is a very funny writer, but also a serious plotter — Guardian
the most remarkable and mesmerising series of novels, set mostly and explicitly in London, to have appeared in years. It is hypnotically fascinating, absolutely contemporary, cynical and hopeful — The Arts Desk
London Rules epitomises precisely why Mick Herron's espionage novels are the new hallmarks of the genre. It's a rousing, provocative - and genuinely funny, at times - political thriller with a labyrinthine plot — Simon McDonald
Jackson Lamb - subtle of brain but outrageously gross in almost every other way - still rules over his band of misfit agents in this fifth title in Herron's hilarious take on the contemporary spy thriller. Based at decrepit Slough House, dumping ground for the security services' awkward squad, his team get the jump on their disdainful colleagues when a weird terrorist plot starts to play out — Sunday Times Crime Club
If Slough House on Aldersgate Street EC1 really existed it would already rival the Old Curiosity Shop on Portsmouth Street WC2 as a landmark of literary London . . . Herron has read his Carl Hiaasen as well as his Charles Dickens. The coruscating cynicism and cartoon comedy do not detract from the seriousness of the message: 'Hate crime pollutes the soul, but only the souls of those who commit it' — Evening Standard
The fifth instalment of the award-winning Jackson Lamb series is witty, sardonic and laugh-out-loud funny yet also thrilling and thought-provoking. Not many people can turn a terror attack into a farce but Herron achieves it with a cleverly constructed story, well-rounded characters and poetic prose. Herron has often been compared with spy thriller greats John le Carré and Len Deighton but it is time he was recognised in his own right as the best thriller writer in Britain today. In a series that never lets its fans down, London Rules is the best instalment yet — Sunday Express, *****
By turns gripping and laugh-out-loud funny, with few concessions to the stifling modern cult of you-can't-say-that — Daily Mail, Books of the Year 2018
So funny that you might easily miss the bleak pain of many of the characters involved — Literary Review
The curmudgeonly spymaster Jackson Lamb and his superannuated colleagues go from strength to strength, with Herron balancing suspenseful counterterrorism antics with black farce — The i, Best Books of 2018
The permanently sozzled and flatulent Jackson Lamb, a former spook now reduced to managing disgraced spies at Slough House, is one of modern literature's greatest creations — Ben Walsh, Evening Standard
Mick Herron's London Rules the fifth in his blackly comic Jackson Lamb spy series, got the year off to a cracking start as it filleted the pretensions of Britain's contemporary intelligence forces — Irish Times, Book of the Year
Witty, thrilling and thought-provoking, it is Herron's best novel yet — Daily Express
John Murray

Jackson Lamb Thriller 6

Mick Herron
Authors:
Mick Herron

Coronet

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A series of gruesome killings take place in Dubai, Ghana and America. The victims are all connected with the SAS. In Hereford Danny Black realises they have something more specific in common - they were all involved in training a young Muslim soldier, Ibrahim Khan.Khan has been working under cover in Islamic State in a mission organised by MI6. Danny Black sets out to track him down with the help of Khan's MI6 handler on a trail that leads him to a library of ancient manuscripts in Damascus, the Syrian desert and finally back in the Brecon Beacons. There Danny discovers that he has finally met his match, his deadliest enemy - and it is the last person he ever expected.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Malta Exchange

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Coronet

Red Strike

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John Murray

The Drop

Mick Herron
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No Tomorrow

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Luke Jennings
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Codename Villanelle

Luke Jennings
Authors:
Luke Jennings

The basis for KILLING EVE, now a major BBC TV series, starring Sandra Oh'Gloriously exciting' MetroShe is the perfect assassin.A Russian orphan, saved from the death penalty for the brutal revenge she took on her gangster father's killers.Ruthlessly trained. Given a new life. New names, new faces - whichever fits.Her paymasters call themselves The Twelve. But she knows nothing of them. Konstantin is the man who saved her and the one she answers to.She is Villanelle. Without conscience. Without guilt. Without weakness.Eve Polastri is the woman who hunts her. MI5, until one error of judgment costs her everything.Then stopping a ruthless assassin becomes more than her job. It becomes personal.Originally published as ebook singles: Codename Villanelle, Hollowpoint, Shanghai and Odessa.No Tomorrow, the second book in the Killing Eve series, is available now!Praise for Killing Eve TV series'A dazzling thriller . . . mightily entertaining' Guardian 'Entertaining, clever and darkly comic' New York Times

Coronet

Head Hunters

Chris Ryan
Authors:
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Hodder & Stoughton

The Red Ribbon

H.B. Lyle
Authors:
H.B. Lyle

A Financial Times thriller of the yearThe thrilling follow up to The Irregular: A Different Class of Spy, featuring Wiggins - an ex-soldier who was trained as a child by Sherlock Holmes. Praise for The Irregular 'H.B. Lyle has found the golden thread between Bond and Holmes' Giles Foden, author of The Last King of Scotland'Impressive period detail and sharp dialogue add charm to the strong plot' Daily Mail'A thrilling story of espionage, murder and the creation of the Secret Service' Charles Cumming, author of A Colder WarCaptain Vernon Kell's fledgling secret intelligence service is under pressure. It's meant to root out German spies and quell foreign threats, but with few results it faces closure.Harassed by politicians, like the ambitious Winston Churchill, bullied by Special Branch, undermined by his colleague Cumming's ill-advised foreign ventures and alarmed at his wife's involvement with militant suffragettes, Kell is making no progress in tracking high-profile leaks from the government. To make matters worse, his only agent, Wiggins, would rather be working on cases of his own.Wiggins grew up on the streets, one of the urchins trained in surveillance by Sherlock Holmes and known as the Baker Street Irregulars. He has promised to avenge the death of his best friend, and to track down a missing girl.But when his search takes him towards a club in Belgravia - a club containing a lot of young women and presided over by the fearsome Big T, one of his former gang-mates - Wiggins is drawn into a conspiracy that will test both his personal and his professional resolve.A satisfying, standalone sequel to The Irregular: A Different Class of Spy, H.B. Lyle's brilliantly entertaining spy story is also a superb evocation of London in 1910, from the finest drawing rooms to the meanest streets.

Mulholland Books

Make Them Sorry

Sam Hawken
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This is What Happened

Mick Herron
Authors:
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Something's happened. A lot of things have happened. If she could turn back time, she wondered how far she would go.Twenty-six-year-old Maggie Barnes is someone you would never look at twice. Living alone in a month-to-month sublet in London, with no family but an estranged sister, no boyfriend or partner, and not much in the way of friends, Maggie is just the kind of person who could vanish from the face of the earth without anyone taking notice.Or just the kind of person MI5 needs to thwart an international plot that puts all of Britain at risk.Now one young woman has the chance to be a hero - if she can think quickly enough to stay alive.

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'Absorbing . . . an intelligent and clear-eyed account of much that goes on in our country' Sunday Times'Wry and readable' GuardianGetting to grips with Great Britain is harder than ever. We are a nation that chose Brexit, rejects immigration but is dependent on it, is getting older but less healthy, is more demanding of public services but less willing to pay for them, is tired of intervention abroad but wants to remain a global authority. We have an over-stretched, free health service (an idea from the 1940s that may not survive the 2020s), overcrowded prisons, a military without an evident purpose, an education system the envy of none of the Western world. How did we get here and where are we going?How Britain Really Works is a guide to Britain and its institutions (the economy, the military, schools, hospitals, the media, and more), which explains just how we got to wherever it is we are. It will not tell you what opinions to have, but will give you the information to help you reach your own. By the end, you will know how Britain works - or doesn't.'Stig Abell is an urbane, and often jaunty guide to modern Britain, in the mould of Bill Bryson' Irish Times

Coronet

Global Strike

Chris Ryan
Authors:
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Charles Street was once a highly-respected agent working for MI6, until a terrible mistake cost him his job. Now he's a desperate man, living on past glories and struggling to make ends meet. Until he makes a discovery that has the power to bring down the new President of the United States. But when Street tries to cash in on this discovery, he finds himself pursued by a Russian snatch squad.Strike Back hero John Porter and Regiment renegade John Bald are recruited by their handler to head to Washington, D.C. Their mission: find Street before the Russians.What begins as a routine exfiltration quickly descends into a brutal struggle and the ex-SAS legends will need to use all of their fighting instincts to stay alive.A startling revelation that leads from the White House to the Kremlin threatens to trigger a new global conflict...

Hodder & Stoughton

A Damned Serious Business

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Authors:
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'The novel is an absorbing briefing on cyberwarfare as well as a masterclass in characterisation' SUNDAY TIMES Thriller of the MonthThere is a new cold war raging and its frontline warriors are Russian hackers - gang-members working freelance for the FSB, successor to the KGB. Massive thefts of personal information, electoral interference, catastrophic disruption of commercial and social services, banks, airlines, even whole countries disabled - this is happening now.Nicknamed 'Boot' because of his obsession with the Duke of Wellington and the battle of Waterloo, Edwin Coker is a case officer at the Vauxhall headquarters of MI6. When a young hacker falls into his hands and reveals details of a secret meeting, Boot conceives a daring plan to strike back - not with a computer virus of his own, but with a bomb that will seriously damage the Russian operation, spreading fear and distrust.Now Boot and his little team need a 'deniable' handler to deliver the explosives across the border from Estonia into Russia and bring the hacker back out. They turn to Merc, an ex-soldier fighting in Iraq, a gun-for-hire who knows how to get out of a tight spot. They hope.From the moment Merc sets out to cross the River Narva things do not go to plan and when the hacker's sister becomes involved, his mission turns from tough to near impossible. The scene is set for a classic story of pursuit and evasion and an epic battle for survival.

John Murray

The List

Mick Herron
Authors:
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'Mick Herron is an incredible writer and if you haven't read him yet, you NEED to' Mark BillinghamDieter Hess, an aged spy, is dead, and John Bachelor, his MI5 handler, is in deep, deep trouble. Death has revealed that the deceased had been keeping a secret second bank account - and there's only ever one reason a spy has a secret second bank account. The question of whether he was a double agent must be resolved, and its answer may undo an entire career's worth of spy secrets.

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Slow Horses

Mick Herron
Authors:
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Hodder & Stoughton

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H.B. Lyle
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Coronet

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Coronet

Shadow Kill

Chris Ryan
Authors:
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Held up by rebel forces in a brutal siege, John Porter is tested to the limit in the African jungle. Strikeback hero John Porter is sent on a mission with Regimental scallywag John Bald. Where Porter plays it by the book, Bald will always want to break the rules.They are sent to Sierra Leone to extract Ronald Soames, a former CO of the Regiment and now right-hand man to the President. But when Porter and Bald arrive the Englishman has disappeared, leaving a trail of destruction in his wake. Rebels are threatening to take over the country and its diamond mines - and to massacre all foreigners.Porter and Bald find themselves fighting shoulder to shoulder with the Regiment psychopath who is already embedded in the country.But it soon becomes clear that the Firm has lied to them about the true nature of the mission.What seems at first to be a battle to control Sierra Leone's diamond mines will turn out to about a much greater evil - and with a trail that leads back to both Westminster and the Kremlin.

John Murray

Spook Street

Mick Herron
Authors:
Mick Herron

WINNER OF THE CWA IAN FLEMING STEEL DAGGER'Mick Herron is an incredible writer and if you haven't read him yet, you NEED to' Mark BillinghamNever outlive your ability to survive a fight.Twenty years retired, David Cartwright can still spot when the stoats are on his trail. Jackson Lamb worked with Cartwright back in the day. He knows better than most that this is no vulnerable old man. 'Nasty old spook with blood on his hands' would be a more accurate description.'The old bastard' has raised his grandson with a head full of guts and glory. But far from joining the myths and legends of Spook Street, River Cartwright is consigned to Lamb's team of pen-pushing no-hopers at Slough House.So it's Lamb they call to identify the body when Cartwright's panic button raises the alarm at Service HQ.And Lamb who will do whatever he thinks necessary, to protect an agent in peril . . .Preorder London Rules, the next Jackson Lamb novel, now.