Stephen Tomkins - The Journey to the Mayflower - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473649125
    • Publication date:16 Jan 2020

The Journey to the Mayflower

God’s Outlaws and the Invention of Freedom

By Stephen Tomkins

  • Hardback
  • £20.00

Gripping story of the events that led up to the sailing of the Mayflower

2020 sees the 400th anniversary of the sailing of the Mayflower - the ship that took the Pilgrim Fathers to the New World. It's a foundational event in American history, but it began as an English story, which pioneered the idea of religious freedom.

The illegal underground movement of Protestant separatists from Elizabeth I's Church of England is a story of subterfuge and danger, arrests and interrogations, prison and executions. It starts with Queen Mary's attempts to burn Protestantism out of England, which created a Protestant underground. Later, when Elizabeth's Protestant reformation didn't go far enough, radicals recreated that underground, meeting illegally throughout England, facing prison and death for their crimes. They went into exile in the Netherlands, where they lived in poverty - and finally the New World.

Stephen Tomkins tells this fascinating story - one that is rarely told as an important piece of English, as well as American, history - that is full of contemporary relevance: religious violence, the threat to national security, freedom of religion and tolerance of dangerous opinions.

This is a must-read book for anyone interested in the untold story of how the Mayflower came to be launched.

Biographical Notes

Stephen Tomkins is the author of eight books on Christian history, including biographies of William Wilberforce and John Wesley. He is the editor of Reform magazine, and was previously deputy editor of Third Way. His broadcast work has included BBC1, BBC2, BBC4, Radio 2, Radio 4 and the World Service, and he has written for the Guardian, BBC and Church Times. He speaks on history and religion at national and local festivals. He performs stand up comedy and plays lead guitar in a covers band. He has a PhD in church history from the London School of Theology.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473649101
  • Publication date: 16 Jan 2020
  • Page count: 288
  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton

Alan Titchmarsh

Alan Titchmarsh is known to millions through the popular BBC TV programmes British Isles: A Natural History, How to be a Gardener, Ground Force and Gardeners' World. But he started out in far humbler beginnings, in a rural childhood on the edge of Ilkley Moor in Yorkshire.After a spell at Kew he became a horticultural journalist, as an Editor of gardening magazines, before becoming a freelance broadcaster and writer.He has twice been named 'Gardening Writer of the Year' and for four successive years was voted 'Television Personality of the Year' by the Garden Writers' Guild. In 2004 he received their Lifetime Achievement Award.Alan has appeared on radio and television both as a gardening expert and as an interviewer and presenter, fronting such programmes as Points of View, Pebble Mill, Songs of Praise, Titchmarsh's Travels and Ask the Family, and since 1983 has presented the BBC's annual coverage of The Chelsea Flower Show. He now has his own daytime TV show on ITV, The Alan Titchmarsh Show. Alan has written more than forty gardening books, as well as seven best-selling novels, including his 2008 success, Folly, which have all made the Sunday Times Bestsellers List. Alan has published three volumes of memoirs; Trowel and Error sold over 200,000 copies in hardback when published in 2002, and Nobbut A Lad, about his Yorkshire childhood, was published in October 2006 with similar success, and his third volume of memoir Knave of Spadeswas a Sunday Times bestseller.He was made MBE in the millennium New Year Honours list and holds the Victoria Medal of Honour, the Royal Horticultural Society's highest award. He lives with his wife and a menagerie of animals in Hampshire where he gardens organically.

Andrea Wulf

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in England. She is the author of several acclaimed books. The Brother Gardeners won the American Horticultural Society Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize. Her book Founding Gardeners was on the New York Times bestseller list. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. She appears regularly on TV and radio.

Anthony Riches

Anthony Riches began his lifelong interest in war and soldiers when he first heard his father's stories about World War II. This led to a degree in Military Studies at Manchester University. He began writing the story that would become Wounds of Honour after a visit to Housesteads in 1996. He lives in Hertfordshire with his wife and three children.www.anthonyriches.comwww.twitter.com/AnthonyRiches

Charles Allen

Charles Allen was born in India, where six generations of his family served under the British Raj. After being educated in England, he returned to the Indian sub-continent in 1966 to work with Voluntary Service Overseas in Nepal. He ended his service with a long walk through the Himalayas that won him the Sunday Telegraph Traveller of the year trophy in 1967. Since then he has trekked and climbed extensively in the Himalayas and in other corners of the world. He is the author of many highly acclaimed books.

Cody Mcfadyen

Cody Mcfadyen designed websites until he became a full time writer when he got a publishing deal for his first thriller, SHADOW MAN. He lives in Southern California with his two black labradors. He drinks coffee (copiously), plays guitar (badly), and reads (voraciously). He abhors adverbs in writing, except when used in short biographies like this one.Visit Cody Mcfadyen's website at www.codymcfadyen.com

Dan Fesperman

Dan Fesperman is a war correspondent for Baltimore's The Sun. In the past they have sent him to cover the Gulf War from Jordan, Saudi Arabia and Kuwait; then sent him to Berlin to run the paper's Europe bureau during the years of the Yugoslav civil wars in Croatia and Bosnia; and in 2001 assigned him to cover events in Pakistan and Afghanistan in the wake of 9-11. Along the way he also reported from throughout the rest of Europe and the Middle East. Dan is currently on extended leave from The Sun in order to write his next two thrillers. So far Dan Fesperman is the author of six highly acclaimed novels of international suspense, including THE PRISONER OF GUANTANAMO which won the 2006 Hammett Prize awarded by the International Association of Crime Writers. Dan Fesperman also won the CWA John Creasey Award for best debut crime novel for LIE IN THE DARK in 1999 and his second novel, THE SMALL BOAT OF GREAT SORROWS, won the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger Award for best thriller in 2003. He lives in Baltimore with his family. Visit his website at www.danfesperman.com.

David Suchet

David Suchet CBE is an acclaimed British actor. He has enjoyed great success with the RSC and in London's West End. He is best known in television for his portrayal of Agatha Christie's detective Hercule Poirot. He is also a practising Anglican. In 2012 he made a series for the BBC called 'In the Footsteps of St Paul'. Follow him on Twitter @David_Suchet

Deon Meyer

Deon Meyer lives near Cape Town in South Africa. His big passions are motorcycling, music, reading, cooking and rugby. In January 2008 he retired from his day job as a consultant on brand strategy for BMW Motorrad, and is now a full time author. Deon Meyer's books have attracted worldwide critical acclaim and a growing international fanbase. Originally written in Afrikaans, they have now been translated into twenty-eight languages.THIRTEEN HOURS was shortlisted for the CWA International Dagger and won the Boeke Prize in South Africa - the first time in the prize's 16 year history that a South African book has won. His novels have also won literary prizes in France, Sweden, Germany and the Netherlands, and the film rights to seven of his novels have been optioned or sold.Deon has also written two television series, and several screenplays for movies. In 2013 he directed one of his original scripts for the feature film The Last Tango.Visit the author's website at www.deonmeyer.com and follow him on Twitter @MeyerDeon

Derek Haas

Derek Haas is the author of THE SILVER BEAR, the Barry Award-nominated HUNT FOR THE BEAR, and DARK MEN. Derek also co-wrote the screenplays for 3:10 to Yuma, starring Russell Crowe and Christian Bale, and Wanted, starring James McAvoy, Morgan Freeman, and Angelina Jolie. He is currently working on the Sky Living TV series Chicago Fire. Derek lives in Los Angeles.Visit his website at derekhaas.com or follow him on Twitter @popcornhaas.

Elizabeth Goudge

Elizabeth de Beauchamp Goudge was born on April 24th 1900 in Wells, Somerset, where her father was Principal of Wells Theological College. Although she had privately intended writing as a career, her parents insisted she taught handicrafts in Oxford. She began writing in her spare time and her first novel ISLAND MAGIC, set in Guernsey, was a great success here and in America. GREEN DOLPHIN COUNTRY (1944) projected her to fame, netting a Literary Guild Award and a special prize of £30,000 from Louis B. Mayer of MGM before being filmed.In her later years Elizabeth Goudge settled in Henley-on-Thames. She died on April 1st, 1984.

Fiona Stanford

Fiona Stanford has been an Army wife for fifteen years, and has moved eleven times since her wedding day.She and her husband Richard have two children. She works as a nurse and her first book Don't Say Goodbye: Our Heoes and the Families They leave Behind was published by in February 2011.

Frank Schätzing

Frank Schätzing has had a career as a marketing executive as well as being the author of several highly successful historical crime novels, and he lives and writes in Cologne.Schätzing became Germany's most successful thriller writer in decades when he published Der Schwarm in 2004. THE SWARM (Der Schwarm) topped the German bestseller charts for over a year after it was published, and was translated into English and published by Hodder in the UK in 2006. Uma Thurman bought the film rights to THE SWARM in May 2006, which is now in development and due for release in 2010.

Franny Moyle

Franny Moyle has a degree in English and History of Art from St John's College, Cambridge. She enjoyed a career in arts programming at the BBC that culminated in her becoming the corporation's first Commissioner for Arts and Culture. She is now a freelance executive producer and writer as well as a director of the Hackney Empire, which is near her home in East London. She is married and has three children.

Geoffrey Wilson

Geoffrey Wilson was born in South Africa, grew up in New Zealand and then backpacked around the world before eventually settling in the United Kingdom. He studied Hinduism and Buddhism at the University of Canterbury, New Zealand, and has been fascinated by India since travelling there in the early 1990s.He worked in IT for several years, eventually starting a web development business with three friends.www.geoffreywilson.net

Henry Hemming

Henry Hemming lives in London, UK.

Henry Hitchings

Henry Hitchings was born in 1974. He has contributed to many newspapers and magazines, and is theatre critic for the Evening Standard.

Ian Wooldridge

Born on 14 January, 1932, Ian Wooldridge was educated at Brockenhurst Grammar School. Despite leaving with just two O-levels in English and Art, he went on to become the most prestigious sports journalist of his era - if not of all time. His first job was with the New Milton Advertiser, but his talent saw him swiftly moving on to greater things and after spells at the Bournemouth Times, the News Chronicle and Sunday Dispatch, he found his spiritual home at the Daily Mail in 1961 where he remained until his death in 2007.The accolades to his prodigious talent are seemingly endless: winner of the British Press Awards' Columnist of the Year in 1975 and 1976; four times winner of Sportswriter of the Year Award- 1972, 1974, 1981 and 1989; Sports Council Sportswriter of the Year in 1987, 1988 and 1996; and the Sports Council's Sports Feature Writer of the Year in 1991 and 1997. In 2006 he won the London Press Club's Edgar Wallace Award for his lifetime's contribution to journalism. As well as his articles he made television documentaries for the BBC, and wrote six books: Cricket, Lovely Cricket (1963); Mary P with Mary Peters (1974); MCC: the Autobiography of a Cricketer with Colin Cowdrey (1976); The Best of Wooldridge (1978); Travelling Reserve (1982); and Sport in the Eighties (1989).He married married twice - to Veronica Churcher in 1957 with whom he had three sons, and then to Sarah Chappell Lourenço in 1980, his wife for the rest of his life.

James Buchan

James Buchan first visited Iran nearly forty years ago. A student of Persian and Arabic, he was for many years a correspondent of the Financial Times in the Middle East, and later in central Europe and the US. He has written more than a dozen works of fiction and history including a portrait of Edinburgh in the eighteenth century (Capital of the Mind), a biography of the Scottish philosopher Adam Smith (Adam Smith and the Pursuit of Perfect Liberty) and a philosophy of money (Frozen Desire). His most recent book is Days of God: The Revolution in Iran and its Consequences. He works a small farm in Norfolk.

James Fox

James Fox is the reader of SELECTIONS FROM EXODUS-DEUTERONOMY (audio). His distinguished career spans theatre, TV and film. His TV credits include Joanna Trollope's The Choir and A Question of Attribution. His film work includes A Passage to India, The Russia House, and Remains of the Day.

Jamie Buckingham

Jamie Buckingham is a freelance writer and pastor.