Caitlin Davies - Bad Girls - Hodder & Stoughton

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • Hardback £20.00
    More information
    • ISBN:9781473647749
    • Publication date:08 Mar 2018
  • Downloadable audio file £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781473674479
    • Publication date:08 Mar 2018
  • Paperback £9.99
    More information
    • ISBN:9781473647763
    • Publication date:07 Mar 2019

Bad Girls

A History of Rebels and Renegades

By Caitlin Davies

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

A history of a century of women, punishment and crime in HM Prison Holloway.

'Davies's absorbing study serves up just enough sensationalism - and eccentricity - along with its serious inquiry' SUNDAY TIMES

'[A] revealing account of the jail's 164-year history' DAILY TELEGRAPH, 5* review

'Insightful and thought-provoking and makes for a ripping good read' JEREMY CORBYN

'A much-needed and balanced history' OBSERVER

'Davies explores how society has dealt with disobedient women - from suffragettes to refugees to women seeking abortions - for decades, and how they've failed to silence those who won't go down without a fight' STYLIST

Society has never known what to do with its rebellious women.

Those who defied expectations about feminine behaviour have long been considered dangerous and unnatural, and ever since the Victorian era they have been removed from public view, locked up and often forgotten about. Many of these women ended up at HM Prison Holloway, the self-proclaimed 'terror to evil-doers' which, until its closure in 2016, was western Europe's largest women's prison.

First built in 1852 as a House of Correction, Holloway's women have come from all corners of the UK - whether a patriot from Scotland, a suffragette from Huddersfield, or a spy from the Isle of Wight - and from all walks of life - socialites and prostitutes, sporting stars and nightclub queens, refugees and freedom fighters. They were imprisoned for treason and murder, for begging, performing abortions and stealing clothing coupons, for masquerading as men, running brothels and attempting suicide. In Bad Girls, Caitlin Davies tells their stories and shows how women have been treated in our justice system over more than a century, what crimes - real or imagined - they committed, who found them guilty and why. It is a story of victimization and resistance; of oppression and bravery.

From the women who escaped the hangman's noose - and those who didn't - to those who escaped Holloway altogether, Bad Girls is a fascinating look at how disobedient and defiant women changed not only the prison service, but the course of history.

Biographical Notes

Caitlin Davies was born in London in 1964. She is the author of five novels and five non-fiction books, and has worked as a teacher and freelance journalist for 25 years. In 1989 she moved to Botswana where she worked for the country's first tabloid newspaper, the Voice, and later as editor of the Okavango Observer. She received a Journalist of the Year award. From 2014-2017 she worked as a Royal Literary Fund Fellow at the University of Westminster, Harrow, in the faculty of Media, Arts & Design.
Caitlindavies.co.uk
@CaitlinDavies2

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473647756
  • Publication date: 08 Mar 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: John Murray
Readable, compelling and illuminating — The Bookseller
Caitlin Davies writes with warmth, empathy and humour about the women - some brave and rebellious - who spent time in Holloway Prison. Assiduously researched, Bad Girls documents interweaving struggles against prejudice, injustice, ignorance and poverty. It is a call for a more enlightened justice system that provides respect and rehabilitation, the stirrings of which were evident on my visits, as the local Member of Parliament, to the prison before its closure in 2016. The stark mismatch between prison regimes and everyday life in the streets outside points to the potential benefit of increased contact between prisons and local communities. I want to thank Caitlin Davies for ensuring the real history of Holloway is written in this insightful and thought-provoking book - which makes for a ripping good read — Jeremy Corbyn
Davies's absorbing study serves up just enough sensationalism - and eccentricity - along with its serious inquiry . . . Davies captures the sense of camaraderie that blossomed inside Holloway, occasionally between warder and inmate . . . Davies uses the prison as a prism through which to chart changing attitudes to women over the past 164 years - beginning with the Victorian notion of "double deviance", which suggested that female criminals had broken not only the law of the land, but that of nature by committing "unwomanly" acts — Helen Davies, SUNDAY TIMES
It's such a great read . . . fascinating — Jo Good, BBC Radio London
A rich, superbly researched, definitive history of Holloway Prison . . . There are so many heartbreaking stories within stories in the book' — The Herald
Meticulously records a much-needed and balanced history of this home to "royalty and socialites, spies and prostitutes . . . Nazis and aliens, terrorists and freedom fighters" and thousands of very ordinary desperate women — Yvonne Roberts, Observer
Fascinating both for its portrait of larger-than-life women and the ways in which they were regarded by wide society during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries — History Revealed
Readable, compelling and illuminating
Caitlin Davies writes with warmth, empathy and humour about the women - some brave and rebellious - who spent time in Holloway Prison. Assiduously researched, Bad Girls documents interweaving struggles against prejudice, injustice, ignorance and poverty. It is a call for a more enlightened justice system that provides respect and rehabilitation, the stirrings of which were evident on my visits, as the local Member of Parliament, to the prison before its closure in 2016. The stark mismatch between prison regimes and everyday life in the streets outside points to the potential benefit of increased contact between prisons and local communities. I want to thank Caitlin Davies for ensuring the real history of Holloway is written in this insightful and thought-provoking book - which makes for a ripping good read
Davies's absorbing study serves up just enough sensationalism - and eccentricity - along with its serious inquiry . . . Davies captures the sense of camaraderie that blossomed inside Holloway, occasionally between warder and inmate . . . Davies uses the prison as a prism through which to chart changing attitudes to women over the past 164 years - beginning with the Victorian notion of "double deviance", which suggested that female criminals had broken not only the law of the land, but that of nature by committing "unwomanly" acts
It's such a great read . . . fascinating
A rich, superbly researched, definitive history of Holloway Prison . . . There are so many heartbreaking stories within stories in the book'
Meticulously records a much-needed and balanced history of this home to "royalty and socialites, spies and prostitutes . . . Nazis and aliens, terrorists and freedom fighters" and thousands of very ordinary desperate women
Fascinating both for its portrait of larger-than-life women and the ways in which they were regarded by wide society during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries
Sceptre

My Past Is a Foreign Country

Zeba Talkhani
Authors:
Zeba Talkhani

Hodder Paperbacks

Queen Victoria

Lucy Worsley
Authors:
Lucy Worsley

John Murray

Empire of Democracy

Simon Reid-Henry
Authors:
Simon Reid-Henry
John Murray

The Stonemason

Andrew Ziminski
Authors:
Andrew Ziminski

Hodder Paperbacks

The F Word

Lily Pebbles
Authors:
Lily Pebbles
Sceptre

Threads of Life

Clare Hunter
Authors:
Clare Hunter

John Murray

On This Day in History

Dan Snow
Authors:
Dan Snow
Hodder & Stoughton

Henry VIII and the men who made him

Tracy Borman
Authors:
Tracy Borman

Henry VIII is well known for his tumultuous relationships with women, and he is often defined by his many marriages. But what do we see if we take a different look? When we see Henry through the men in his life, a new perspective on this famous king emerges...Henry's relationships with the men who surrounded him reveal much about his beliefs, behaviour and character. They show him to be capable of fierce, but seldom abiding loyalty; of raising men only to destroy them later. He loved to be attended and entertained by boisterous young men who shared his passion for sport, but at other times he was more diverted by men of intellect, culture and wit. Often trusting and easily led by his male attendants and advisers during the early years of his reign, he matured into a profoundly suspicious and paranoid king whose favour could be suddenly withdrawn, as many of his later servants found to their cost. His cruelty and ruthlessness would become ever more apparent as his reign progressed, but the tenderness that he displayed towards those he trusted proves that he was never the one-dimensional monster that he is often portrayed as. In this fascinating and often surprising new biography, Tracy Borman reveals Henry's personality in all its multi-faceted, contradictory glory.

John Murray

Britain by the Book

Oliver Tearle
Authors:
Oliver Tearle
John Murray

Born Lippy

Jo Brand
Authors:
Jo Brand
Hodder & Stoughton

The Girl De-Construction Project

Rachel Gardner
Authors:
Rachel Gardner

Hodder & Stoughton

The Publishing Game

Edward Stourton
Authors:
Edward Stourton

Hodder & Stoughton

Fighting on the Home Front

Kate Adie
Authors:
Kate Adie
Two Roads

Natives

Akala
Authors:
Akala
Hodder Paperbacks

Jane Austen at Home

Lucy Worsley
Authors:
Lucy Worsley

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER'This is my kind of history: carefully researched but so vivid that you are convinced Lucy Worsley was actually there at the party - or the parsonage.' Antonia Fraser'A refreshingly unique perspective on Austen and her work and a beautifully nuanced exploration of gender, creativity, and domesticity.' Amanda ForemanOn the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, historian Lucy Worsley leads us into the rooms from which our best-loved novelist quietly changed the world.This new telling of the story of Jane's life shows us how and why she lived as she did, examining the places and spaces that mattered to her. It wasn't all country houses and ballrooms, but a life that was often a painful struggle. Jane famously lived a 'life without incident', but with new research and insights Lucy Worsley reveals a passionate woman who fought for her freedom. A woman who far from being a lonely spinster in fact had at least five marriage prospects, but who in the end refused to settle for anything less than Mr Darcy.

Hodder & Stoughton

Death in Ten Minutes

Fern Riddell
Authors:
Fern Riddell
John Murray

France

John Julius Norwich
Authors:
John Julius Norwich

I can still feel, as if it were yesterday, the excitement of my first Channel crossing (as a child of nearly 7) in September 1936; the regiment of porters, smelling asphyxiatingly of garlic in their blue-green blousons; the raucous sound all around me of spoken French; the immense fields of Normandy strangely devoid of hedges; then the Gare du Nord at twilight, the policemen with their képis and their little snow-white batons; and my first sight of the Eiffel Tower...This book is written in the belief that the average English-speaking man or woman has remarkably little knowledge of French history. We may know a bit about Napoleon or Joan of Arc or Louis XIV, but for most of us that's about it. In my own three schools we were taught only about the battles we won: Crécy and Poitiers, Agincourt and Waterloo. The rest was silence. So here is my attempt to fill in the blanks...John Julius Norwich (at 88) has finally written the book he always wanted to write, the extremely colourful story of the country he loves best. From frowning Roman generals and belligerent Gallic chieftains, to Charlemagne (hated by generations of French children taught that he invented schools) through Marie Antoinette and the storming of the Bastille to Vichy, the Resistance and beyond, FRANCE is packed with heroes and villains, adventures and battles, romance and revolution. Full of memorable stories and racy anecdotes, this is the perfect introduction to the country that has inspired the rest of the world to live, dress, eat -- and love better.

Hodder Paperbacks

Coretta: My Life, My Love, My Legacy

Coretta Scott King, Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds
Authors:
Coretta Scott King, Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds

'Coretta is more relevant today than ever . . . a female who takes responsibility for creating something better in the time she has and the space she has to occupy: that is true greatness. And Coretta did that.' Maya AngelouBorn in 1927 in the Deep South, Coretta Scott always felt called to a special purpose. After an awakening to political and social activism at college, Coretta went on to study at the New England Conservatory of Music, where she met Martin Luther King Jr. - the man who would one day become her husband. The union thrust Coretta into a maelstrom of history, throughout which her tireless fight for political and social justice established her as a champion of American civil rights.Now, fifty years after her husband's death, the story of Coretta's life is told in full for the first time: a love story, a family saga, a record of the legacy left by this extraordinary woman.'Presents the reader with a different way of looking at the world' New York Times

John Murray

Win Win

Joanne Lipman
Authors:
Joanne Lipman
Sceptre

Deeds Not Words

Helen Pankhurst
Authors:
Helen Pankhurst