Dr Joseph Jebelli - In Pursuit of Memory - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473635753
    • Publication date:01 Jun 2017
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    • ISBN:9781473648111
    • Publication date:01 Jun 2017

In Pursuit of Memory

The Fight Against Alzheimer's: Shortlisted for the Royal Society Prize

By Dr Joseph Jebelli

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  • £12.99

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  • ISBN: 9781473635760
  • Publication date: 25 Jan 2018
  • Page count: 336
  • Imprint: John Murray
Joseph Jebelli's wonderfully clear, vividly readable and comprehensive survey of the search for a cure . . . The world is closing in on Alzheimer's. There is nowhere left for it to hide — THE TIMES
A fascinating quest at the frontiers of neuro-degeneration... and a moving, sober and forensic study of the past, present and future of Alzheimer's from the point of view of a neurologist who has lived with the disease, at home and in the lab, from a very young age. The story Jebelli tells illustrates the tantalising mystery of Alzheimer's: it's both highly visible yet agonizingly elusive...a timely analysis [that] might give comfort. — ROBERT McCRUM, OBSERVER
A personal story and smart scientific thinking reveal the history and humanity behind an epidemic that affects 44 million people worldwide — NEW SCIENTIST
A riveting debut... the very human story of the disease that is now an epidemic — BOOKSELLER, SCIENCE BOOK OF THE MONTH
In Pursuit of Memory is a remarkable combination of fine writing, personal honesty and deep scientific insight - about a devastating and baffling disease that is becoming all too common. Jebelli weighs up all the evidence and all the theories about Alzheimer's and even allows us a glimpse of optimism about a cure — MATT RIDLEY
An accessible, diligently researched and well-travelled overview of the disease that is more deadly than cancer. Jebelli poignantly weaves the current science with the tragic stories of affected families, not least his own — SUNDAY TIMES
The definitive portrait of Alzheimer's disease - an illness that is rapidly becoming the defining plague of the 21st century — Big Issue
On the surface it's about Alzheimer's disease but more than that it demonstrates how challenging it is to understand the brain — Suzanne O'Sullivan, Observer, BOOKS OF THE YEAR
An elegant and precise writer, Jebelli follows every lead for a cure with the panache of a detective novelist, giving readers much to hope for despite the devastation Alzheimer's has left in its wake. Based on his meticulous and wide-ranging research, he makes a convincing argument that Alzheimer's will be defeated in the decades to come. Jebelli analyzes every facet of Alzheimer's with personal empathy and scientific rigor, a combination that makes for enthralling reading. — Kirkus, starred review
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