Meredith Hooper - The Longest Winter - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Hardback £20.00
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    • ISBN:9780719595806
    • Publication date:10 Jun 2010
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    • ISBN:9781848542709
    • Publication date:14 Oct 2010

The Longest Winter

Scott's Other Heroes

By Meredith Hooper

  • Paperback
  • £9.99

The untold story of Scott's Northern Party and their incredible survival of an Antarctic winter

Scott's 'Northern Party' played an important role in his iconic last expedition, but how did they survive?

Their tents were torn, their food was nearly finished and the ship had failed to pick them up as winter approached. Stranded and desperate, the six men dug out an ice cave with no room to stand upright. Circumstances forced them closer together and somehow they made it through the longest winter. Working from diaries, journals and letters written by expedition members, Meredith Hooper tells the intensely human story of Scott's other expedition.

Biographical Notes

Meredith Hooper has the rare, possibly unique, distinction of being selected as a writer in Antarctica by three government programmes - the US National Science Foundation Artists & Writers Program, twice; by the British Admiralty, travelling on HMS Endurance; and by the Australian National Antarctic Research Expeditions. She has written a range of books and articles on Antarctica (general market, academic, children's). The Ferocious Summer was published in last August.

Meredith Hooper is a UK Trustee of the Brussels-based International Polar Foundation, a Trustee of the UK Antarctic Heritage Trust and served as a juror on the British Antarctic Survey's Artists & Writers Programme. She was awarded the Antarctica Service Medal by the US Congress in 2000.

Meredith was born in Australia and has been living in the UK since taking up a scholarship at Oxford to do post-graduate research.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9780719595905
  • Publication date: 09 Jun 2011
  • Page count: 384
  • Imprint: John Murray
A cracking story — Mail on Sunday
This book relives their fears and squalid surroundings from day to day. Even as you lie in the sun on holiday, you will be chilled, gripped and amazed by the human resilience displayed in such awesome conditions — Daily Mail
Authoritative and insightful . . . [an] enjoyable, vivid study of the English in extremis — Sunday Times
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