Related to: 'The Betrayal'

John Murray

Ghosts of Christmas Past

Neil Gaiman, M. R. James, Jenn Ashworth, E. Nesbit, Louis de Bernières, Muriel Spark, Frank Cowper, E. F. Benson, Bernard Capes, L. P. Hartley, Robert Aickman, Jerome K. Jerome, Kelly Link
Authors:
Neil Gaiman, M. R. James, Jenn Ashworth, E. Nesbit, Louis de Bernières, Muriel Spark, Frank Cowper, E. F. Benson, Bernard Capes, L. P. Hartley, Robert Aickman, Jerome K. Jerome, Kelly Link
John Murray

The Hireling

L. P. Hartley
Authors:
L. P. Hartley

Overcome with grief at her husband's death, Lady Franklin, an eligible young widow, unburdens herself to Leadbitter - a gallant, hard-bitten ex-soldier who has invested his savings in the car he drives for hire - as he takes her on a series of journeys. He in turn beguiles her with stories of his non-existent wife and children, drawing her out of her self-absorption and weaving a dream-life with Lady Franklin at its heart. Half-hoping to make his dream come true, Leadbitter takes a bold, not to say reckless, step which costs him dearly, and brings these characters' tangled story to a dramatic and unexpected conclusion.

John Murray

My Fellow Devils

L. P. Hartley
Authors:
L. P. Hartley

Margaret Pennefather is essentially a good person - too good, perhaps, for her own good. Her rash and hasty marriage to film star Colum McInnes, and his very different set of moral values, leads gradually and relentlessly to the utter destruction of their love and their marriage. Although she is only a nominal Protestant and he a very lax Roman Catholic, Margaret cannot escape the religious questionings implicit in their union. Her mental and spiritual struggles persist and gather momentum through all the disasters of her married life. Its outcome is the climax to a story that must surely rank as one of the most impressive L. P. Hartley has given us.

John Murray

The Boat

L. P. Hartley
Authors:
L. P. Hartley
John Murray

A Perfect Woman

L. P. Hartley
Authors:
L. P. Hartley
John Murray

The Brickfield

L. P. Hartley
Authors:
L. P. Hartley

Alex Jennings

Alex Jennings is the reader of SELECTIONS FROM 1 & 2 SAMUEL (audio). He is a well-known and talented young actor. His theatre work for the RSC includes the lead in Hamlet and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing.

Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte, born in 1816, was the sister of Anne and Emily. All wrote famous novels; none lived beyond the age of forty. The sisters were educated at home, and began to write elaborate stories about imaginary kingdoms. Jane Eyre was published under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. Two other novels, Shirley and Villette were published in Charlotte's lifetime, and although all three achieved success at the time, she was regarded by some to have written too 'emotionally' and 'grossly' for a clergyman's daughter. She died in 1854, shortly after her marriage to her father's curate.

Compton Mackenzie

Sir Compton Mackenzie OBE (1883-1972) was born into a theatrical family in 1883. A writer and Scottish nationalist, he published almost a hundred books across a range of different genres, including fiction, history, biography, literary criticism, satire, children's stories and poetry. He is best known for two comedies set in Scotland, Whisky Galore and The Monarch of the Glen. Carnival and The Adventures of Sylvia Scarlett are now back in print as part of the John Murray Heritage Series.

Daphne Du Maurier

Daphne du Maurier (1907-89) was born in London and educated at home and in Paris. She lived most of her life in her beloved Cornwall, the setting for most of her novels.

Denise Robins

Denise Robins was born in 1897. Known as the Queen of Romance, she wrote over 160 novels, selling more than one hundred million copies worldwide. Robins' characters are as varied as her themes - the protagonists ranging from eighteen to middle age - while the wonderful variety of settings includes London, Paris, the Swiss mountains, Egypt, Sri Lanka and Morocco. She died at the age of eighty-eight on 1 May 1985.

E M Forster

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, attended Tonbridge School and went on to King's College, Cambridge in 1897, where he retained a lifelong connection and was elected to an Honorary Fellowship in 1946.He died in June 1970.

Emily Bronte

Emily Bronte, who only lived from 1818 to 1848, was the sister of Charlotte and Anne; all three of them wrote famous novels, and all died young. The sisters were educated at home and together created imaginary worlds in which Emily set many stories and poems. Emily was particularly drawn to the stark moorlands around Haworth, which are such a feature of Wuthering Heights, published in 1845. The book was not a critical success at the time, and was only recognised after her death as one of the greatest novels ever written.

Frank Herbert

Frank Herbert was born in 1920. His colourful and varied career included stints as a radio news commentator and jungle survival instructor. He is best known for creating the world of DUNE, which became the bestselling science fiction novel of all time. It won great acclaim, as well as the Hugo and Nebula awards, establishing Frank Herbert as a master of modern science fiction. He died in 1986. His son, Brian Herbert, has now begun a new series of Dune novels, Prelude to Dune in collaboration with Kevin J. Anderson . The first novel to appear in the new series is House Atreides, published by Hodder & Stoughton.www.dunenovels.com

George Bernard Shaw

George Bernard Shaw was born in Dublin in 1856 and moved to London in 1876. He wrote a number of novels, of which LOVE AMONG THE ARTISTS, AN UNSOCIAL SOCIALIST and CASHEL BYRON'S PROFESSION are currently available from John Murray. In 1925 Shaw was awarded the Nobel Prize for literature. He refused a peerage and the Order of Merit from the first Labour Government. He died in 1950.

George Eliot

George Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans was born on a farm in Warwickshire in 1819. After her father's death she travelled on the continent and returned to begin writing for the Westminster Review, becoming assistant editor in 1851. Eliot's novels, portraying farmers, traders and the lower middle classes, will always stand out among the greatest of the English school.

Gustave Flaubert

Born in Rouen, the son of a doctor, Flaubert reluctantly studied law at Paris where his friendship with Victor Hugo and the poet Louise Colet, his lover from 1846 to 1854, stimulated his already apparent talent for writing. As a young man he was afflicted by a nervous disease, which may to some extent account for the morbidity and pessimism which characterise much of his work. This, together with a violent contempt for bourgeois society is revealed in his best-known novel Madame Bovary. The book caused a scandal when it was condemned as immoral and its author prosecuted unsuccessfully, but it is now justifiably regarded and loved as a classic and timeless novel.

James Stephens

James Stephens, poet and storyteller, was born in Dublin in 1880. From 1915 to 1924 he was registrar of the National Gallery in Dublin. He spent the remaining years of his life in London, where he broadcast frequently from the BBC. He died in 1950.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born in 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, where her father was rector. When she was 25 the family moved to Bath till her father's death in 1805, then to Chawton in Hampshire where Jane lived with her mother and sister. She wrote six novels. Sense and Sensibility was first in 1811, then Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma(1816). Northanger Abbey and Persusaion were both published posthumously, in 1817. Jane Austen died in 1817. Well-received during her lifetime, since her death she has become known as not just one of the greatest writers of English fiction, but one of the most beloved.

John Buchan

John Buchan, 1st Baron Tweedsmuir, was born in 1875 in Perth, Scotland. He studied at Glasgow and Oxford Universities and turned to politics shortly after graduation, reaching the position of Governer General of Canada when he died in 1940. During the First World War he worked as a war correspondent for The Times, before joining the British Army Intelligence Corps, where he wrote speeches for Sir Douglas Haig. His experience of war left him vehemently opposed to armed conflict. He wrote many novels, poems, biographies, histories and works of social interest but is most famous for his Richard Hannay novels, The Thirty-Nine Steps and GREENMANTLE.