Related to: 'Trigonometry: A Complete Introduction'

Julie Sarkissian blogs about the problems facing the protagnist of her debut novel, DEAR LUCY

Something's Wrong With Lucy - But What?

Lucy is different – that much is clear. She speaks like a child, doesn’t recognize social boundaries, flies into rages, and treasures rotten food. Her cognition is impaired, her vocabulary is very limited and she cannot read or write. But what – precisely – is wrong with her is left up to the reader. Lucy is the protagonist of my novel, DEAR LUCY, and from the first sentence of the book I ever wrote it was obvious that Lucy was cognitively different. The way Lucy describes herself is as “missing too many words.” Her mother calls her “difficult.” Readers of early drafts of the book had a few theories as to Lucy’s condition; autism, Williams Syndrome, Down Syndrome. But Lucy’s mother has kept her from going to school and Lucy has never seen a doctor. So in the fictional reality of the book there is no official diagnosis. But as the novel progressed I wondered – should I have one? I was torn. If Lucy was presenting enough symptoms to point to a real condition, was I ignoring the obvious not to fold that condition into my development of her character? Was it insensitive of me to allude to aspects of certain real, life-altering conditions but not assign a specific condition to Lucy? I worried about appropriating aspects of serious conditions without treating those conditions with proper respect and acknowledgement. And though any clinical diagnosis would probably not be explicit in the novel, I wondered if I would be ignoring an opportunity to bring attention to a real disorder when people asked me about Lucy’s condition, the way The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-time did for autism. On the other hand, I had concerns that if I chose a diagnosis for Lucy, I would be ascribing to her qualities that she wouldn’t have otherwise presented. Lucy had her own will over my writing and over the novel. I didn’t want to yoke Lucy’s expression by keeping her behavior and abilities consistent with a clinical condition. Accuracy would also become a critical issue if Lucy’s condition was named. Ultimately I chose not to diagnose Lucy, though I worry the artistic freedom provided by that decision comes at the price of being judged for being too liberal with my treatment of cognitive disorders. Now that publication is a few months away, I am apprehensive of how my treatment of Lucy’s cognitive limitations will be judged. I have yet to talk to a reader who has a learning different child, or works with learning different people, and that conversation is one I will be honored, and not a bit anxious, to have.

John Murray Learning

Maths Unwrapped

Mattias Ribbing, Per Sundin
Authors:
Mattias Ribbing, Per Sundin
Teach Yourself

Calculus: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill

Calculus: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using calculus. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all areas of calculus, including functions, gradients, rates of change, differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions and integration. Everything you will need to know is here in one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

Teach Yourself

Algebra: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill
John Murray Learning

How Numbers Work

Think of a number between one and ten. No, hang on, let's make this interesting. Between zero and infinity. Even if you stick to the whole numbers, there are a lot to choose from - an infinite number in fact. Throw in decimal fractions and infinity suddenly gets an awful lot bigger (is that even possible?) And then there are the negative numbers, the imaginary numbers, the irrational numbers like pi which never end. It literally never ends.The world of numbers is indeed strange and beautiful. Among its inhabitants are some really notable characters - pi, e, the "imaginary" number i and the famous golden ratio to name just a few. Prime numbers occupy a special status. Zero is very odd indeed: is it a number, or isn't it?How Numbers Work takes a tour of this mind-blowing but beautiful realm of numbers and the mathematical rules that connect them. Not only that, but take a crash course on the biggest unsolved problems that keep mathematicians up at night, find out about the strange and unexpected ways mathematics influences our everyday lives, and discover the incredible connection between numbers and reality itself. ABOUT THE SERIESNew Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

John Murray Learning

Machines that Think

Sometime in the future the intelligence of machines will exceed that of human brain power. So are we on the edge of an AI-pocalypse, with superintelligent devices superseding humanity, as predicted by Stephen Hawking? Or will this herald a kind of Utopia, with machines doing a far better job at complex tasks than us? You might not realise it, but you interact with AIs every day. They route your phone calls, approve your credit card transactions and help your doctor interpret results. Driverless cars will soon be on the roads with a decision-making computer in charge. But how do machines actually think and learn? In Machines That Think, AI experts and New Scientist explore how artificial intelligence helps us understand human intelligence, machines that compose music and write stories - and ask if AI is really a threat.ABOUT THE SERIESNew Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

John Murray Learning

How Evolution Explains Everything About Life

How did we get here? All cultures have a creation story, but a little over 150 years ago Charles Darwin introduced a revolutionary new one. We, and all living things, exist because of the action of evolution on the first simple life form and its descendants.We now know that it has taken 3.8 billions of years of work by the forces of evolution to turn what was once a lump of barren rock into the rich diversity of into plants, animals and microbes that surround us. In the process, evolution has created all manner of useful adaptions, from biological computers (brains) to a system to capture energy from the sun (photosynthesis). But how does evolution actually work? In Evolution, leading biologists and New Scientist take you on a journey of a lifetime, exploring the question of whether life is inevitable or a one-off fluke, and how it got kick-started. Does evolution have a purpose or direction? Are selfish genes really the driving force of evolution? And is evolution itself evolving?ABOUT THE SERIESNew Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

John Murray Learning

Your Conscious Mind

John Murray Learning

Why the Universe Exists

Teach Yourself

Statistics: An Introduction: Teach Yourself

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham

Do you need to gain confidence with handling numbers and formulae? Do you want a clear, step-by-step guide to the key concepts and principles of statistics? Nearly all aspects of our lives can be subject to statistical analysis. Statistics: An Introduction shows you how to interpret, analyze and present figures.Assuming minimal knowledge of maths and using examples from a wide variety of everyday contexts, this book makes often complex concepts and techniques easy to get to grips with. This new edition has been fully updated.Whether you want to understand the statistics that you are bombarded with every day or are a student or professional coming to statistics from a wide range of disciplines, Statistics: An Introduction covers it all.

Teach Yourself

Basic Mathematics: An Introduction: Teach Yourself

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham

Basic Mathematics teaches you all the maths you need for everyday situations. If you are terrified by maths, this is the book for you.Do you shy away from using numbers? Basic Mathematics can help. An easy-to-follow guide, it will ensure you gain the confidence you need to tackle maths and overcome your fears. It offers simple explanations of all the key areas, including decimals, percentages, measurements and graphs, and applies them to everyday situations, games and puzzles to help you understand mathematics quickly and enjoyably.Everything you need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes clear explanations, worked examples and test questions. At the end of the book there are challenges and games to give you new and interesting ways to practise your new skills.

Teach Yourself

Jung: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Phil Goss
Authors:
Phil Goss

Jung: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear, jargon-free English and providing added-value features like summaries of key books, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your seminar or exam.The book uses a structure that mirrors the way Jung is taught on many university and counselling courses. Chapters include individuation and the archetypal power of the unconscious, Jung's early life, Jung's early career and key influences, Freud and Jung, the self and ego, the dark side, anima and animus, archetypes, typology, Jungian analysis, working with dreams, active imagination, developmental approaches, application of Jungian analysis to mental health needs, and Jung's legacy in culture, spirituality and therapy.Jung employs the 'Breakthrough Method' to help you advance quickly at any subject, whether you're studying for an exam or just for your own interest. The Breakthrough Method is designed to overcome typical problems you'll face as learn new concepts and skills.- Problem: "I find it difficult to remember what I've read."; Solution: this book includes end-of-chapter summaries and questions to test your understanding.- Problem: "Lots of introductory books turn out to cover totally different topics than my course."; Solution: this book is written by a university lecturer who understands what students are expected to know.

Hodder & Stoughton

Mathematics: All That Matters

Mike Askew
Authors:
Mike Askew

Mathematics often gets a bad press. Describing someone as 'calculating' or 'rational' is hardly as flattering as being labelled 'artistic' or 'creative' and mathematicians in movies or novels are often portrayed as social misfits who rarely get the guy or girl. No wonder some folks say 'oh I don't care for mathematics, I was never any good at it' with a wistful sense of pride. Yet professional mathematicians talk of the subject differently. They look for elegant solutions to problems, revel in playing around with mathematical ideas and talk of the creative nature of mathematics. As the Russian mathematician Sophia Kovalevskaya said "It is impossible to be a mathematician without being a poet in soul."So why is there such a gap between the views of everyday folks and professional mathematicians? Part of the problem lies in how most of us were taught mathematics in school. The mathematics served up there is presented as a series of de-contextualised, abstract ideas, wrested from the human struggles and interactions that gave birth to the ideas. Through looking at some of the history of mathematics, psychological studies into how we come to know mathematics and key ideas in mathematics itself, the intent of this book is, if not to make the reader fall in love with mathematics, then at least to come to understand its nature a little better, and perhaps care a little more for it. In short, this book explores the human side of maths.

Teach Yourself

Mathematics: A Basic Introduction: Teach Yourself

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham

The book covers all the basic areas of mathematics including calculating, fractions, decimals, percentages, measuring, graphs and formulae.Everything you will need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions. At the end of the book a series of challenges and games provide new and interesting ways to apply your new skills.

Teach Yourself

Statistics: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham
Teach Yourself

Mathematics: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
Authors:
Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
Hodder & Stoughton

Mathematics: Bullet Guides

Sophie Goldie
Authors:
Sophie Goldie

Open this book and you will Be numerate Understand key principles Conquer difficult problems Handle data confidently

Hodder & Stoughton

Statistics: Bullet Guides

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham
Hodder & Stoughton

Mathematics Made Easy: Flash

Trevor Johnson, Hugh Neil
Authors:
Trevor Johnson, Hugh Neil
Hodder & Stoughton

Naked Numbers The Three Rules to Make Your Life Add Up

Paul Carson
Authors:
Paul Carson
Teach Yourself

Complete Mathematics

Trevor Johnson, Hugh Neill
Authors:
Trevor Johnson, Hugh Neill

Are you looking for a clear, accessible guide to mathematics that can help you brush up your skills and rediscover the key concepts and techniques? Complete Mathematics provides an invaluable, step-by-step introduction to the subject. Packed full of worked examples and useful exercises, it will guide you through the essentials quickly and easily, giving you the knowledge you need to gain maths confidence.NOT GOT MUCH TIME?One, five and ten-minute introductions to key principles to get you started.AUTHOR INSIGHTSLots of instant help with common problems and quick tips for success, based on the author's many years of experience.TEST YOURSELFTests in the book and online to keep track of your progress.EXTEND YOUR KNOWLEDGEExtra online articles at www.teachyourself.com to give you a richer understanding of psychology.FIVE THINGS TO REMEMBERQuick refreshers to help you remember the key facts.TRY THISInnovative exercises illustrate what you've learnt and how to use it.