Related to: 'Machines that Think'

About JM Learning

John Murray

The Brain

Congratulations! You're the proud owner of the most complex information processing device in the known universe. The human brain comes equipped with all sorts of useful design features, but also many bugs and weaknesses. Problem is you don't get an owner's manual. You have to just plug and play. As a result, most of us never properly understand how our brains work and what they're truly capable of. We fail get the best out of them, ignore some of their most useful features and struggle to overcome their design faults. Featuring witty essays, enlightening infographics and fascinating 'try this at home' experiments, New Scientist take you on a journey through intelligence, memory, creativity, the unconscious and beyond. From the strange ways to distort what we think of as 'reality' to the brain hacks that can improve memory, The Brain: A User's Guide will help you understand your brain and show you how to use it to its full potential.

Teach Yourself

Calculus: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill

Calculus: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using calculus. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all areas of calculus, including functions, gradients, rates of change, differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions and integration. Everything you will need to know is here in one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

Teach Yourself

Algebra: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill

Algebra: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using Algebra.Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all the key areas of algebra including elementary operations, linear equations, formulae, simultaneous equations, quadratic equations, logarithms, variation, laws and sequences.Everything you will need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.Chapter 1: The meaning of algebraChapter 2: Elementary operations in algebraChapter 3: Brackets and operations with themChapter 4: Positive and negative numbersChapter 5: Equations and expressionsChapter 6: Linear equationsChapter 7: FormulaeChapter 8: Simultaneous equationsChapter 9: Linear inequalitiesChapter 10: Straight-line graphs; coordinatesChapter 11: Using inequalities to define regionsChapter 12: Multiplying algebraical expressions Chapter 13: FactorsChapter 14: FractionsChapter 15: Graphs of quadratic functionsChapter 16: Quadratic equationsChapter 17: IndicesChapter 18: LogarithmsChapter 19: Ratio and proportionChapter 20: VariationChapter 21: The determination of lawsChapter 22: Rational and irrational numbers and surdsChapter 23: Arithmetical and geometric sequences

John Murray Learning

The Quantum World

Teach Yourself

Statistics: An Introduction: Teach Yourself

Alan Graham
Authors:
Alan Graham
John Murray

New Scientist: The Origin of (almost) Everything

Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel
Contributors:
Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel

Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking.When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?Every society has stories about the origin of the cosmos and its inhabitants, but now, with the power to peer into the early universe and deploy the knowledge gleaned from archaeology, geology, evolutionary biology and cosmology, we are closer than ever to understanding where it all came from. In The Origin of (almost) Everything, New Scientist explores the modern origin stories of everything from the Big Bang, meteorites and dark energy, to dinosaurs, civilisation, timekeeping, belly-button fluff and beyond.From how complex life evolved on Earth, to the first written language, to how humans conquered space, The Origin of (almost) Everything offers a unique history of the past, present and future of our universe.

Teach Yourself

Practical Electronics: A Complete Introduction

Andy Cooper
Authors:
Andy Cooper

Now completely revised, Practical Electronics: A Complete Introduction covers the key areas of electronics you need to be confident in, whether you are a keen amateur hobbyist, an engineering student or a professional who wants to keep up to date. It outlines the basics in clear jargon-free English and provides added-value features like key ideas, memorable quotations and even lists of questions you might be asked in a seminar or exam.The book has been updated to remove complex and abstract technical thought and replace it with practical information that will be essential for students and general readers alike. It builds on basic principles such as simple circuits and switches, going on to explain how basic components can be used to form versatile digital systems, which can be combined and programmed to create new functional systems. It also covers microprocessor technology and microcontroller chips, showing how to program microcontrollers for learners wishing to explore this new technology. Practical Electronics employs the 'Breakthrough Method' to help you advance quickly at any subject, whether you're studing for an exam or just for your own interst. The Breakthrough Method is designed to overcome typical problems you'll face as learn new concepts and skills.- Problem: "I find it difficult to remember what I've read."; Solution: this book includes end-of-chapter summaries and questions to test your understanding.- Problem: "Lots of introductory books turn out to cover totally different topics than my course."; Solution: this book is written by a university lecturer who understands what students are expected to know.

Teach Yourself

Mathematics: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
Authors:
Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
John Murray

The Blind Giant

Nick Harkaway
Authors:
Nick Harkaway
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Cult of the Amateur

Andrew Keen
Authors:
Andrew Keen

A new, updated edition, with a new foreword of Andrew Keen's witty and provocative polemic against the rise of user-generated content and the anything goes standards of much online publishing, which set the blogosphere and media alight on publication. Dubbed the 'anti-christ' of Silicon Valley and a dot-com apostate Andrew Keen is the leading contemporary critic of the Internet. and The Cult of the Amateur is a scathing attack on the mad utopians of Web 2.0 and the wisdom of the crowd. Keen argues that much of the content filling up YouTube, MySpace, and blogs is just an endless digital forest of mediocrity which, unconstrained by professional standards or editorial filters, can alter public debate and manipulate public opinion.

Andrew Keen

Andrew Keen hosts the acclaimed podcast show, AfterTV, and his views have generated a firestorm of interest.

Garry Kasparov

Garry Kasparov is a business speaker, global human rights activist, author and former world chess champion. His keynote lectures and seminars on strategic thinking, achieving peak performance, and tech innovation have been acclaimed in dozens of countries. A frequent contributor to the Wall Street Journal, he is the author of two books, How Life Imitates Chess and Winter is Coming, each of which has been translated into more than a dozen languages. He lives in New York.

Geoff Colvin

Geoff Colvin is Fortune's senior editor-at-large and is also the author of Talent is Overrated and The Upside of the Downturn. He has served as moderator of the Fortune Global Forum, where he has interviewed Bill Gates, Jack Welch, Herb Kelleher, Peter Drucker and other business legends. Colvin graduated Harvard cum-laude with a B.A. in Economics, and received his MBA from New York University's Stern School.

Graham Lawton

After a degree in biochemistry and a MSc in science communication, both from Imperial College, Graham Lawton landed at New Scientist, where he has been for almost all the 21st century, first as features editor and now as executive editor. His writing and editing have won a number of awards.

Jennifer Daniel

Jennifer Daniel is the author of SPACE! a picture book explaining the universe through unusual visual forms. Her graphics have been translated into over ten languages and featured on NPR's Morning Edition, Sweden's Dagens Nyheter and in The New York Times. Jennifer has been recognised by many fancy design, illustration, and journalism awards including D&AD's Gold Pencil (London), Art Directors Club Gold Cube (New York), and Society of Publication Design Gold Medal (New York). She speaks about journalism and design for organisations such as Society of News Design, SXSW, and Creative Mornings. She lives in Oakland California, with her husband and two children.Follow her on Twitter @jenniferdaniel

Nick Harkaway

Nick Harkaway is the author of two novels, The Gone-Away World and Angelmaker and a regular blogger for the Bookseller's FutureBook website. From 1999 to 2008, he was a jobbing scriptwriter. During that time he also wrote brochure copy for a company selling bottle-capping machinery, and the website text for an exclusive lingerie boutique. He lives in London with his wife Clare, a human rights lawyer, and his daughter Clemency.

Randall Munroe

Randall Munroe is the creator of the webcomic xkcd and bestselling author of What If?, Thing Explainer and xkcd: Volume 0. Randall was born in Easton, Pennsylvania, and grew up outside Richmond, Virginia. After studying physics at Christopher Newport University, he got a job building robots at NASA Langley Research Center. In 2006 he left NASA to draw comics on the internet full time, and has since been nominated for a Hugo Award three times. The International Astronomical Union recently named an asteroid after him: asteroid 4942 Munroe is big enough to cause mass extinction if it ever hits a planet like Earth.

Richard Watson

British writer Richard Watson advises organisations on the future, focusing on innovation and scenario planning. He is the author and publisher of What's Next, a quarterly report on global trends and writes about trends for a number of people and publications including Fast Company. His clients have included IBM, Virgin, Toyota, McDonald's, Tesco, News Limited, Westfield, Unilever, Coca-Cola and the Department of Education. A regular visitor to the UK, he maintains a website and blog at http://toptrends.nowandnext.com and is Chief Futurist at the Future Exploration Network , and a member of Futures House.

Ruby Wax

Ruby Wax is a comedian, writer, performer and mental health campaigner. She has suffered bouts of depression throughout her life and completed her Masters in Mindfulness-based Cognitive therapy at Oxford in 2012.

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking is the former Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and author of A Brief History of Time which was an international bestseller. He is now the Dennis Stanton Avery and Sally Tsui Wong-Avery Director of Research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and Founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge.