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Teach Yourself

Your Brain and You

Nicky Hayes
Authors:
Nicky Hayes

Most general knowledge about the brain and its workings is very dated, drawing on studies from the first part of the previous century or even earlier. However, the advent of brain scanning which allows the study of the ordinary working brain, rather than just dead ones or people having brain surgery, has resulted in some amazing new developments that contribute immensely to our general social understanding of people and how they work. Written by Dr Nicky Hayes, bestselling author of Understand Psychology, Your Brain and You is a beginner's guide to neuropsychology. It takes you through every aspect of how your brain works, from nervous systems and brain structures to neural transmission and neural correlates. You will discover how it all began, how it works, how we see, do things, hear and experience the outside world. Explore memories, relationships, emotions, decision-making, sleep, consciousness and common disorders such as dyslexia, dysgraphia & dyscalculia. As with all Teach Yourself books, it is clearly structured, packed full of practical examples, and designed to make it easy to learn the essentials you really need to know.ABOUT THE SERIESPeople have been learning with Teach Yourself since 1938. With a vast range of practical how-to guides covering language learning, lifestyle, hobbies, business, psychology, and self-help, there's a Teach Yourself book for everything you want to do. Join more than 60 million people who have reached their goals with Teach Yourself, and never stop learning.

Teach Yourself

Algebra: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Hope Circuit

Martin Seligman
Authors:
Martin Seligman

One of the most important psychologists alive today tells the story of the transformation of modern psychology through the lens of his own career and change of heart.Martin E. P. Seligman is one of the most decorated and popular psychologists of his generation. When he first encountered the discipline in the 1960s, it was devoted to eliminating misery: the science of how past trauma creates present symptoms. Today, thanks in large part to Seligman's own work pioneering the Positive Psychology movement, it is ever more focused on the bright side; gratitude, resilience, and hope.In this his memoir, Seligman recounts how he learned to study optimism; including a life-changing conversation with his five-year-old daughter. In wise, eloquent prose, Seligman tells the human stories behind some of his major findings. He recounts developing CAVE, an analytical tool that predicts election outcomes (with shocking accuracy) based on the language used in campaign speeches, and the canonical studies that birthed the theory of learned helplessness - which he now reveals was incorrect. And he writes at length for the first time about his own battles with depression at a young age.All the while, Seligman works out his theory of psychology, making a compelling and deeply personal case for the importance of virtues like hope, anticipation, gratitude, and wisdom for our mental health. You will walk away from this book not just educated but deeply enriched.

John Murray

New Scientist: The Origin of (almost) Everything

Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel
Contributors:
Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel

Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking.When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?Every society has stories about the origin of the cosmos and its inhabitants, but now, with the power to peer into the early universe and deploy the knowledge gleaned from archaeology, geology, evolutionary biology and cosmology, we are closer than ever to understanding where it all came from. In The Origin of (almost) Everything, New Scientist explores the modern origin stories of everything from the Big Bang, meteorites and dark energy, to dinosaurs, civilisation, timekeeping, belly-button fluff and beyond.From how complex life evolved on Earth, to the first written language, to how humans conquered space, The Origin of (almost) Everything offers a unique history of the past, present and future of our universe.

Teach Yourself

Psychology: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Sandi Mann
Authors:
Sandi Mann

Written by Dr Sandi Mann, Senior Lecturer at the University of Central Lancashire, Psychology: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear jargon-free English, and then providing added-value features like summaries of key experiments, and even lists of questions you might be asked in your seminar or exam.The book uses a structure that mirrors the way Psychology is taught on many university courses. Chapters include key topics in psychology research; cognitive issues, including language, emotion, memory and perception; individual differences - intelligence, personality and gender; social psychology; mental health and psychological disorders/abnormal psychology and the treatment of such; the nervous system; and sleep.

Intercultural Press

The Intercultural Mind

Joseph Shaules
Authors:
Joseph Shaules

In this pioneering book, Joseph Shaules presents exciting new research from cultural psychology and neuroscience. It sheds light on the hidden influence of culture on the unconscious mind, and helps people get more out of their intercultural journeys.The Intercultural Mind presents new perspectives on important questions such as: What is culture shock, and how does it affect us? Why are we blind to our own cultural conditioning? Can cultural differences be measured? What does it mean to have an international mindset? Illustrated with a wealth of examples and memorable stories, The Intercultural Mind is a fascinating look at how intercultural experiences can transform the geography of our minds.

Teach Yourself

Mathematics: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
Authors:
Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson

MATHS DOESN'T HAVE TO BE DIFFICULT!This step-by-step course, complete with exercises and answers, will take you from beginner or intermediate, to being a confident mathematician, in no time. Inside you'll find simple step-by-step explanations to help you grasp new topics or things that have previously confused you, practice questions throughout to help you embed your learning and improve your confidence, and end of chapter summaries to help you remember the key points you've learned. Everything you need is here in one bestselling, tried-and-tested, great-value book, so you don't need any separate workbooks or coursebooks.MATHEMATICS: A COMPLETE INTRODUCTION covers:* Numbers* Angles* Fractions* Two and three-dimensional shapes* Decimals* Statistics* Directed numbers* Graphs* Measurement* Perimeter and area* Algebraic expressions* Approximations* Equations* Percentages* Formulae* Circles* Probability* Ratio and proportion* Pythagoras' theorem and trigonometry* Indices and standard form* AND MUCH MOREABOUT THE SERIESThe Complete Introduction series from Teach Yourself is the ultimate one-stop guide for anyone wanting a comprehensive and accessible entry point into subjects as diverse as philosophy, mathematics, psychology, Shakespeare and practical electronics. Loved by students and perfect for general readers who simply want to learn more about the world around them, these books are your first choice for discovering something new.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Geography of Thought

Richard E. Nisbett
Authors:
Richard E. Nisbett

When Richard Nisbett showed an animated underwater scene to his American students, they zeroed in on a big fish swimming among smaller fish. Japanese subjects, on the other hand, made observations about the background environment...and the different "seeings" are a clue to profound underlying cognitive differences between Westerners and East Asians. As Professor Nisbett shows in The Geography of Thought people actually think - and even see - the world differently, because of differing ecologies, social structures, philosophies, and educational systems that date back to ancient Greece and China, and that have survived into the modern world. As a result, East Asian thought is "holistic" - drawn to the perceptual field as a whole, and to relations among objects and events within that field. By comparison to Western modes of reasoning, East Asian thought relies far less on categories, or on formal logic; it is fundamentally dialectic, seeking a "middle way" between opposing thoughts. By contrast, Westerners focus on salient objects or people, use attributes to assign them to categories, and apply rules of formal logic to understand their behaviour.

Christine Wilding

Christine Wilding's (Kent, England) books on CBT have sold over 50,000 copies. She holds a postgraduate diploma in CBT from the University of London, is an accredited member of the British Association of Counselling, is a member of the steering committee set up to develop guidelines for the treatment of depression within the NHS, and is in-demand as a leader of CBT-based training courses.

Graham Lawton

After a degree in biochemistry and a MSc in science communication, both from Imperial College, Graham Lawton landed at New Scientist, where he has been for almost all the 21st century, first as features editor and now as executive editor. His writing and editing have won a number of awards.

Hannah Critchlow

Dr Hannah Critchlow is the Science Outreach Fellow at Magdalene College, University of Cambridge, and has been named a Top 100 UK Scientist by the Science Council for her work in science communication. She is listed as one of the University of Cambridge's 'inspirational and successful women in science' and appears regularly on TV, radio and at festivals to discuss and explore the brain.

Jennifer Daniel

Jennifer Daniel is the author of SPACE! a picture book explaining the universe through unusual visual forms. Her graphics have been translated into over ten languages and featured on NPR's Morning Edition, Sweden's Dagens Nyheter and in The New York Times. Jennifer has been recognised by many fancy design, illustration, and journalism awards including D&AD's Gold Pencil (London), Art Directors Club Gold Cube (New York), and Society of Publication Design Gold Medal (New York). She speaks about journalism and design for organisations such as Society of News Design, SXSW, and Creative Mornings. She lives in Oakland California, with her husband and two children.Follow her on Twitter @jenniferdaniel

Joseph Shaules

Joseph Shaules, PhD, has worked in intercultural education in Japan, Mexico, and Europe for more than twenty-five years. He is the director of the Japan Intercultural Institute (JII) and teaches at the Rikkyo College of Business and the Keio University International Center. Shaules is a co-presenter on the NHK Television program "Nyuusu de Eikaiwa." He is also the Japan specialist for a consulting and training company based in Germany. He is the author of several books including A Beginner's Guide to the Deep Culture Experience also published by Intercultural Press. He lives in Tokyo.

Jules Montague

Dr Jules Montague is a Consultant Neurologist at the Royal Free Hospital in London, as well as a writer for the Guardian. Her clinical specialisation is eraly-onset dementia and other neurodegenerative diseases. She works with patients who are losing their identities to dementia, amnesia, Alzheimer's and brain injury.

Marc Dingman

Marc Dingman received his Ph.D. in neuroscience in 2013 from the Pennsylvania State University. Since then, he has been a faculty member in the Biobehavioral Health Department at the Pennsylvania State University, where teaches courses in neuroscience and the health sciences. He received the Teaching Excellence Award from the College of Health and Human Development in each of the past four years, the Health and Human Development Alumni Society Excellence in Teaching Award in 2017, and the Biobehavioral Health Outstanding Teaching Award in 2015.

Martin Seligman

Martin Seligman PhD, Professor of Psychology at the University of Pennsylvania and Director of the Positive Psychology Network, gave the Centennial address to the British Psychological Society in 2002 and is an Honorary Professor at the University of Cardiff. A former President of the American Psychological Association, he has written over 20 books including the bestselling Learned Optimism and Authentic Happiness and in 2009 was awarded the British Academy's Wiley Prize in Psychology. He is widely considered the pre-eminent expert on applied psychology in the world.

Richard E. Nisbett

Richard E. Nisbett, Ph.D., has taught psychology at Yale University and the University of Michigan, where he is the Theodore M. Newcomb Distinguished University Professor. He received the Distinguished Scientific Contribution Award of the American Psychological Association, the William James Fellow Award, and a Guggenheim Fellowship and in 2002 became the first social psychologist elected to the National Academy of Sciences in a generation. The co-author of Culture of Honor and numerous other books and articles, he lives in Ann Arbor, Michigan.

Ruby Wax

Ruby Wax is a comedian, writer, performer and mental health campaigner. She has suffered bouts of depression throughout her life and completed her Masters in Mindfulness-based Cognitive therapy at Oxford in 2012.

Scott Grafton

SCOTT GRAFTON holds the Bedrosian-Coyne Presidential Chair in Neuroscience at the University of California in Santa Barbara. He is director of the UCSB Brain Imaging Center and co-director at the Institute for Collaborative Biotechnologies, which draws on bio-inspiration and innovative bioengineering solutions for both non-medical and medical challenges posed by the defense and medical communities. He is internationally recognized for developing multimodal brain mapping techniques and investigations into the organization of the human motor system. He received his medical degree from the University of Southern California and specialty training in neurology and nuclear medicine. His 200 research publications draw on fMRI, magnetic stimulation and high density EEG to characterize the neural basis of goal-directed behaviour and mechanisms of brain plasticity using an approach that is grounded in his experience as a neurologist. He is an avid alpinist with many high-altitude ascents and wilderness meanderings.

Stephen Hawking

Stephen Hawking is the former Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cambridge and author of A Brief History of Time which was an international bestseller. He is now the Dennis Stanton Avery and Sally Tsui Wong-Avery Director of Research at the Department of Applied Mathematics and Theoretical Physics and Founder of the Centre for Theoretical Cosmology at Cambridge.