Related to: 'Trumbo'

Charles R. Cross

Charley Cross has lived in Seattle for many years, is the former editor for the Rocket and writes for Rolling Stone and Esquire.

Colin Escott

Based in the Nashville area, Colin Escott is one of the world's leading experts on country music history. Among his many accomplishments, he co-wrote and co-produced Hank Williams' "Honky Tonk Blues" for PBS in 2004, and was a series consultant and co-writer for BBC-TV's highly acclaimed series on country music "Lost Highway" (2002). His music journalism has been published in two volumes, and he has worked with numerous music legends, including Willie Nelson, Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, and Johnny Cash.

Conor Maynard

Brighton born Conor Maynard is 20 years old. Having developed a love of music whilst studying acting, he began recording music in his bedroom in his early teens and at the age of 16, he was recognised by global superstar NeYo. Conor has collaborated with international stars from NeYo and Pharell to Wiley. He has had a number one album, four top ten singles and was awarded the MTV Brand New for 2012 award

Graham Mccann

Graham McCann is the most admired entertainment writer at work in the UK today. He is the critically acclaimed and best-selling author of books on Dad`s Army; Frankie Howerd, Morecambe & Wise and Cary Grant. His most recent books, THE ESSENTIAL DAVE ALLEN and SPIKE & CO, are published by Hodder.

James Bowen

James Bowen is the author of the bestselling A STREET CAT NAMED BOB and THE WORLD ACCORDING TO BOB. He found Bob the cat in 2007 and the pair have been inseparable ever since. They both live in north London.

James Hamilton

James Hamilton is an art historian with a passion for science too. He has curated many exhibitions, including various Turner exhibitions. He works at the University of Birmingham.

John Connolly

John Connolly is author of the Charlie Parker mysteries, The Book of Lost Things, the Samuel Johnson novels for young adults and, with his partner, Jennifer Ridyard, co-author of the Chronicles of the Invaders. John Connolly's debut - EVERY DEAD THING - introduced the character of Private Investigator Charlie Parker, and swiftly launched him right into the front rank of thriller writers. All his subsequent novels have been Sunday Times bestsellers. He was the winner of the 2016 CWA Short Story Dagger for On the Anatomization of an Unknown Man (1637) by Frans Mier from NIGHT MUSIC: Nocturnes Vol 2.In 2007 he was awarded the Irish Post Award for Literature. He was the first non-American writer to win the US Shamus award and the first Irish writer to win an Edgar award. BOOKS TO DIE FOR, which he edited with Declan Burke, was the winner of the 2013 Anthony, Agatha and Macavity awards for Best Non-Fiction work.

Jordan Belfort

Jordan Belfort was born in Queens, New York. He hustled ices to put himself through college, showing early entrepreneurial flair. His first business sent him bankrupt at twenty-four so he went down to Wall St with $100 in his pocket and ended up building one of the largest brokerages in America - the now infamous Stratton Oakmont. A hard partying lifestyle ended in crash and burn. Ultimately indicted by the federal government, Belfort served twenty-two months in prison, and time in rehab. He's now a highly successful motivational speaker.His story has been made into a Golden Globe-winning and Academy Award-nominated film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and directed by Martin Scorsese.He is currently living in Los Angeles.

Matt Logelin

Born and bred in Minnesota, Matt Logelin was a project manager at Yahoo! until he left the company to focus on writing this book and raising his daughter, Madeline. The two live in Los Angeles, traveling often to see as much of the world as possible. Please visit them at www.mattlogelin.com or follow @mattlogelin.

Melvyn Bragg

Melvyn Bragg is a writer and broadcaster. His novels include The Hired Man, for which he won the Time/Life Silver Pen Award, Without a City Wall, winner of the John Llewellyn Rhys Prize, The Soldier's Return, winner of the WHSmith Literary Award, A Son of War and Crossing the Lines, both of which were longlisted for the Man Booker Prize, A Place in England, which was longlisted for the Lost Man Booker Prize, and most recently Grace and Mary. He has also written several works of non-fiction, the most recent being The Book of Books about the King James Bible. He lives in London and Cumbria.

Michael Caine

Sir Michael Caine CBE has been Oscar-nominated six times, winning his first Academy Award for the 1986 film Hannah and Her Sisters and his second in 1999 for The Cider House Rules. He has starred in over one hundred films, becoming well-known for several critically acclaimed performances including his first major film role in Zulu in 1964, followed by films including The Ipcress Files, Get Carter, Alfie, The Italian Job, Dirty Rotten Scoundrels and Educating Rita, and more recently The Dark Knight, Is Anybody There? and Harry Brown. He was appointed a CBE in 1992 and knighted in 2000 in recognition of his contribution to cinema. Married for more than 30 years, with two daughters and three grandchildren, he and his wife Shakira divide their time between England and the United States.

Michael Parkinson

Michael Parkinson was born in Cudworth, near Barnsley. He began his career as a journalist, but later moved to television where he worked for Granada on current affairs programmes before joining the BBC 24 hours team. In 1965 he began writing a weekly sports column for The Sunday Times. A passionate interest in film led to the publication of A Pictorial History of Westerns, his favourite film genre. His chat show Parkinson ran for 11 years, from 1971 until 1982 and he has interviewed almost everybody who was anybody with the exception of Frank Sinatra - a lasting regret. From 1979 to 1982 he also presented Parkinson for ABC and Channel 10 in Australia, and in the 1980s he was one of the founder members of TV AM.From 1990-92 he presented the Michael Parkinson Show on LBC, a daily, live three hour radio show. From 1986-87 he presented Desert Island Discs on Radio 4 and from 1994-96 he presented Parkinson on Sport for Radio 5. In 1996 Michael launched a Sunday morning show, Parkinson's Sunday Supplement on Radio 2, with music and guests which is still on air today.In 1990 Michael Parkinson joined the Daily Telegraph, writing a regular weekly column on sport. He has won numerous awards including, in 1995, Sports Feature Writer of the Year at the British Sport Journalism Awards. In 1998 he won awards for his work in three different branches of the media - a feat thought to be unique. He won a Sony Radio Award for Parkinson's Sunday Supplement, he was named Sports Writer of the Year at the Press Gazette British Press Awards and Media Personality of the Year by the Variety Club. In June 2000, Michael was awarded a CBE and Parkinson was named one of the top ten favourite British TV programmes of all time. A new series of Parkinson began on ITV in 2004 and continued till November 2007. He was awarded a knighthood for services to broadcasting in the 2008 New Year's honours list.Happily married to his wife Mary for nearly fifty years, they have three sons, and liv

Mick Fleetwood

Mick Fleetwood was born in Cornwall in 1947. He co founded Fleetwood Mac in 1967 and is regarded as one of the greatest drummers of all time. Mick Fleetwood lives in Maui.

Paul Du Noyer

Paul Du Noyer was a music journalist for more than 30 years, whose interviewees ranged from Madonna to Pavarotti, David Bowie to Mick Jagger and The Beatles, not least Paul McCartney and Ringo Starr. Born in Liverpool, Paul was educated at the London School of Economics. He has written the definitive musical histories of both Liverpool and London.

Pete Paphides

Since 1992, Pete Paphides has written about music for publications such as The Times, Guardian, Observer, Q and Mojo. He has also made several documentaries for BBC Radio 4 and presented two series of his all-vinyl radio show, Vinyl Revival, for BBC 6 Music. Over the years he has interviewed a diverse array of artists, including David Bowie, Paul McCartney, Abba, Prince, Beyoncé, Radiohead and The Bee Gees. He has been a regular contributor for BBC Four documentaries such as Pop Charts Britannia, Folk Britannia and The Joy Of Abba. Since buying his first record, aged 9, he has remained an avid collector of vinyl and old music papers. He lives in London with his wife and two daughters.

Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson's DCI Banks is now a major ITV1 drama starring Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) as Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) as DI Annie Cabbot. Peter's standalone novel BEFORE THE POISON won the IMBA's 2013 Dilys Award as well as the 2012 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel by the Crime Writers of Canada. This was Peter's sixth Arthur Ellis award. His critically acclaimed DCI Banks novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world.Peter grew up in Yorkshire, and now divides his time between Richmond and Canada. Peter keeps a website at www.inspectorbanks.com.

Piu Eatwell

Piu Eatwell is the author of BLACK DAHLIA, RED ROSE and The Dead Duke, His Secret Wife, and the Missing Corpse and has produced and researched historical documentaries for the BBC and other channels, including the widely acclaimed film Charles Manson: The Man Who Killed the Sixties. She divides her time between Paris and London with her husband and three children.

Roberto Escobar

Roberto Escobar operated for over fifteen years as the accountant for Pablo Escobar's Medellin drug cartel. He is now incarcerated in a maximum security prison and under 24 hour watch after handing himself into the Colombian authorities in 1992.

Sjón

Born in Reykjavik in 1962, Sjón is a celebrated Icelandic author. He won the Nordic Council's Literary Prize for his novel The Blue Fox and the novel From The Mouth Of The Whale was shortlisted for both the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Independent Foreign Fiction Prize. Moonstone: The Boy Who Never Was was awarded the 2013 Icelandic Literary Prize. Also a poet, librettist and lyricist, he has worked with his countrywoman Björk, written three operas and published eleven volumes of poetry. His novels have been translated into thirty languages. He lives in Reykjavik with his wife and two children.

Tim Clayton

Tim Clayton, a former research fellow at Worcester College, Oxford, is a specialist is eighteenth-century history and culture. He is a leading authority on the printed images of that period. His previous bestselling books include FINEST HOUR, END OF THE BEGINNING and TRAFALGAR, described by the Observer as 'a landmark book'.