Related to: 'Why We Love Music'

Aaron James

Aaron James holds a PhD from Harvard and is Associate Professor of Philosophy at the University of California, Irvine. He was awarded the Burkhardt fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies, spending the 2009-10 academic year at the Center for Advanced Studies in the Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University. James is the author of Fairness in Practice. He's an avid surfer... and he's not an asshole.

Alister McGrath

Alister McGrath is the Andreas Idreos Professor of Science and Religion at Oxford University, and Fellow of Harris Manchester College, Oxford. After initial academic work in the natural sciences, Alister turned to the study of theology and intellectual history, while occasionally becoming engaged in broader cultural debates about the rationality and relevance of the Christian faith. He is the author of many academic and theological works, as well as the bestselling The Dawkins Delusion and, most recently, his acclaimed C. S. Lewis - A Life.

Andrea Wulf

Andrea Wulf was born in India, moved to Germany as a child, and now lives in England. She is the author of several acclaimed books. The Brother Gardeners won the American Horticultural Society Book Award and was long-listed for the Samuel Johnson Prize. Her book Founding Gardeners was on the New York Times bestseller list. Andrea has written for many newspapers including the Guardian, LA Times and New York Times. She was the Eccles British Library Writer in Residence 2013 and a three-time fellow of the International Center for Jefferson Studies at Monticello. She appears regularly on TV and radio.

Brian Draper

Brian Draper is the author of Spiritual Intelligence, Less is More and most recently What Matters Most? He is a regular presenter on BBC Radio 4's Thought for the Day, and works with leaders and organisations to help nurture their spiritual intelligence. He is a writer, speaker, facilitator, as well as a retreat guide, and has introduced countless people to the ancient art of walking labyrinths.He often writes for U2.com and was formerly editor of the Christian current affairs magazine Third Way.

Bryan Sykes

Bryan Sykes is a Professor of Human Genetics at the University of Oxford and a Fellow of Wolfson College. He has been involved in a number of high-profile cases dealing with ancient DNA, including those of 'Otzi the Iceman', a well preserved natural mummy of a man who lived around 3,300 BC and 'Cheddar Man', the remains of a man found in Cheddar Gorge, from approximately 7150 BC, it is Britain's oldest complete human skeleton.Professor Sykes in best known outside the community of geneticists for his bestselling books on the investigation of human history and pre-history through studies of mitochondrial DNA.

Christine Wilding

Christine Wilding's (Kent, England) books on CBT have sold over 50,000 copies. She holds a postgraduate diploma in CBT from the University of London, is an accredited member of the British Association of Counselling, is a member of the steering committee set up to develop guidelines for the treatment of depression within the NHS, and is in-demand as a leader of CBT-based training courses.

Clare Morrall

Clare Morrall's first novel, Astonishing Splashes of Colour, was published in 2003 and shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize that year. She has since published the novels Natural Flights of the Human Mind, The Language of Others, The Man Who Disappeared, which was a TV Book Club Summer Read in 2010, The Roundabout Man and After the Bombing.Born in Exeter, Clare Morrall now lives in Birmingham. She works as a music teacher, and has two daughters.

David Mitchell

Born in 1969, David Mitchell grew up in Worcestershire. After graduating from Kent University, he taught English in Japan, where he wrote his first novel, Ghostwritten. Published in 1999, it was awarded the Mail on Sunday John Llewellyn Rhys Prize and shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award. His second novel, number9dream, was shortlisted for the Booker Prize and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and in 2003, David Mitchell was selected as one of Granta's Best of Young British Novelists. His third novel, Cloud Atlas, was shortlisted for six awards including the Man Booker Prize, and adapted for film in 2012. It was followed by Black Swan Green, shortlisted for the Costa Novel of the Year Award, and The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet, which was a No. 1 Sunday Times bestseller. Both were also longlisted for the Booker. In 2013, The Reason I Jump: One Boy's Voice From the Silence of Autism by Naoki Higashida was published in a translation from the Japanese by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida. It was an immediate bestseller in the UK and later in the US as well.

Dermot O'Leary

Dermot O'Leary has been the much-loved host of ITV's The X Factor for seven series, and is now working on his eighth. He also presents his own Sony award-winning BBC Radio 2 show, which draws in close to 2 million listeners each week. From early beginnings as a Runner for BBC Essex, then a Researcher on the TV show Light Lunch, Dermot became one of the founding presenters on Channel Four's T4, before moving on to presenting and producing Big Brother's Little Brother. Dermot has hosted a number of other programmes including, most recently, Channel Four's ground-breaking documentary Live From Space which broadcast from the International Space Station.

Emily Mackie

Emily Mackie was born in Winchester in 1983 and grew up in Scotland. After graduating with an MA in Creative Writing from Bath Spa University in 2007, her first novel, And This is True, was published in 2010 and was shortlisted for the Dylan Thomas Prize as well as the Saltire Scottish First Book of the Year Award. Her second novel, In Search of Solace, was published by Sceptre in 2014.

Emma Young

Emma Young is an award-winning science and health journalist now based in Sheffield. She has a BSc (Hons) in psychology from the University of Durham and 20 years' experience on titles including the Guardian, the Sydney Morning Herald, and New Scientist. She also writes for Mosaic, the new Wellcome Trust magazine.

Gerald Seymour

Gerald Seymour exploded onto the literary scene in 1975 with the massive bestseller HARRY'S GAME. The first major thriller to tackle the modern troubles in Northern Ireland, it was described by Frederick Forsyth as 'like nothing else I have ever read' and it changed the landscape of the British thriller forever.Gerald Seymour was a reporter at ITN for fifteen years. He covered events in Vietnam, Borneo, Aden, the Munich Olympics, Israel and Northern Ireland. He has been a full-time writer since 1978.Gerald was interviewed recently on Andrew Marr's Sleuths, Spies and Sorcerers on BBC TV.

Graham Lawton

After a degree in biochemistry and a MSc in science communication, both from Imperial College, Graham Lawton landed at New Scientist, where he has been for almost all the 21st century, first as features editor and now as executive editor. His writing and editing have won a number of awards.

Jennifer Daniel

Jennifer Daniel is the author of SPACE! a picture book explaining the universe through unusual visual forms. Her graphics have been translated into over ten languages and featured on NPR's Morning Edition, Sweden's Dagens Nyheter and in The New York Times. Jennifer has been recognised by many fancy design, illustration, and journalism awards including D&AD's Gold Pencil (London), Art Directors Club Gold Cube (New York), and Society of Publication Design Gold Medal (New York). She speaks about journalism and design for organisations such as Society of News Design, SXSW, and Creative Mornings. She lives in Oakland California, with her husband and two children.Follow her on Twitter @jenniferdaniel

Jesse Bering

Jesse Bering, Ph.D. , is a regular contributor to Scientific American, Slate, and Das Magazin (Switzerland) . His writing has also been featured in many other sources, including New York Magazine, Guardian, Discover, The New Republic, NPR, and the BBC . Bering is the former director of the Institute of Cognition and Culture at Queen s University, Belfast, and began his career as a psychology professor at the University of Arkansas.

John Powell

Dr John Powell is a physicist and a classically trained musician, with naturally curly hair. He has given lectures at international laser conferences and played guitar in pubs in return for free beer. He prefers the latter activity. He holds a master's degree in music composition and a PhD in physics, and has taught physics at the universities of Nottingham and Lulea (Sweden) and musical acoustics at Sheffield University. He lives in Nottingham.

Joshua Wolf Shenk

Joshua Wolf Shenk is an essayist, author, and curator based in Los Angeles. He is a contributor to Atlantic, Slate, Harper's and other magazines. His first book, Lincoln's Melancholy, was a New York Times notable book and won prizes from the Lincoln Institute and Mental Health America. Shenk directs the Arts in Mind series on creativity and serves on the general council of The Moth.

Judy Bartkowiak

Judy Bartkowiak's training courses and coaching practice have helped thousands of people to apply the skills of NLP in their everyday lives. She is a qualified NLP Trainer, NLP Master Practitioner, NLP Sports Practitioner, NLP Business Practitioner and NLP Children's Practitioner.

Lesley-Ann Jones

Lesley-Ann Jones is a journalist, newspaper columnist and broadcaster. The author of eight published books, she has enjoyed more than twenty-five years in music and the media. She lives in South-East London with her young children, the eldest having grown up and gone into the music business.

Mary Aiken

Dr. Mary Aiken is the world's foremost forensic cyberpsychologist. She is the director of the Cyberpsychology Research Network, an advisor to Europol, and has conducted research and training workshops with multiple global agencies from INTERPOL to the F.B.I. and White House. She is a Distinguished Professor of the Practice of Cyber Analytics at the Asia-Pacific Institute for Resilience and Sustainability (AIRS) anchored at Hawaii Pacific University. Her research interests include cyber security, organized cybercrime, cyberstalking, human trafficking and the rights of the child online. She is a member of the advisory board of the Hague Justice Portal, a foundation for International peace, justice and security. Her groundbreaking work inspired the CBS television series CSI: Cyber. She is based in Ireland.www.maryaiken.com