Related to: 'The Longest Journey'

Hodder & Stoughton

Maurice

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

As Maurice Hall makes his way through a traditional English education, he projects an outer confidence that masks troubling questions about his own identity. Frustrated and unfulfilled, a product of the bourgeoisie he will grow to despise, he has difficulty acknowledging his nascent attraction to men. At Cambridge he meets Clive, who opens his eyes to a less conventional view of the nature of love. Yet when Maurice is confronted by the societal pressures of life beyond university, self-doubt and heartbreak threaten his quest for happiness.

Hodder & Stoughton

Where Angels Fear to Tread

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster
Hodder & Stoughton

Aspects of the Novel

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster
Hodder & Stoughton

A Room With a View

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

Set partly in Florence, partly in the Surrey hills, A ROOM WITH A VIEW depicts the struggle for the soul of its enchanting heroine, Lucy Honeychuch. Forster's brilliant social comedy examines the English abroad and at home in the country as Lucy's sincere and passionate feelings are contrasted with her prudish cousin Charlotte, her supercilious fiancé and the unconventional Emersons.A Room with a View, originally published in 1908, was made into a Merchant/Ivory film starring Denholm Elliot, Maggie Smith, Helena Bonham-Carter, Judi Dench and Daniel Day Lewis.

Hodder & Stoughton

Howards End

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

In Howards End Forster voiced many of his apprehensions about the future, and the novel has become more relevant than ever as a statement of humane, civilised values, while its subtle characterisation, its blend of irony and lyricism, its humour and its wealth of unobtrusive symbols, make it one of the great English novels. The story of two sisters - Margaret and Helen Schlegel - and their different paths in life was hailed by the critics as Forster's greatest work when it was first published in 1910. 'The word Forsterian is already demanded' wrote the Saturday Review, and the Daily Telegraph said '... all will feel with us that it is a book quite out of the common by a writer who is one of our assets, and likely to become one of our glories.'

Hodder & Stoughton

A Passage to India

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

A Passage to India sparked such political fury that enraged Anglo-Indians threw copies into the Indian Ocean, while in England it helped create a climate of opinion which would take the British out of India in less than a generation.It won the Prix Femina Vie Heureuse and the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, and has sold over a million copies since its first publication in 1924.Adela Quested, visiting from England, shows an interest in Indian ways of life that is frowned upon by the British community. What happens to Adela at the infamous Marabar caves, and the subsequent ordeal of the charming young Dr Aziz, is wrought into a tense drama which throws Chandrapore into a fever of racial tension.

Alex Jennings

Alex Jennings is the reader of SELECTIONS FROM 1 & 2 SAMUEL (audio). He is a well-known and talented young actor. His theatre work for the RSC includes the lead in Hamlet and Benedick in Much Ado About Nothing.

Baroness Orczy

Baroness Orczy was the daughter of a musician. Educated in Paris and Brussels, she then studied art in London, where she exhibited some of her work at the Royal Academy. THE SCARLET PIMPERNEL was the first success in her long writing career which encompassed both plays and novels.

Charles Dickens

Charles Dickens, whose pen name was Boz, is regarded by many as one of the world's greatest authors. His father, a navy clerk, was - like the fathers in many of Dickens' novels - constantly in and out of debtor's prison, and Dickens was sent to work in a blacking factory at the age of twelve. His parents' failure to educate him was a source of great bitterness to him, and he reacted to this indifference by working incredibly hard for his entire life. Beginning as an office boy in a lawyer's office, in time he became a parliamentary reporter and then a journalist. He wrote The Pickwick Papers at the age of twenty-four, and captured the popular imagination in a way no other novelist had done previously. He continued writing and reading his works in public until his sudden death in 1870.

Charlotte Bronte

Charlotte Bronte, born in 1816, was the sister of Anne and Emily. All wrote famous novels; none lived beyond the age of forty. The sisters were educated at home, and began to write elaborate stories about imaginary kingdoms. Jane Eyre was published under the pseudonym of Currer Bell. Two other novels, Shirley and Villette were published in Charlotte's lifetime, and although all three achieved success at the time, she was regarded by some to have written too 'emotionally' and 'grossly' for a clergyman's daughter. She died in 1854, shortly after her marriage to her father's curate.

Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe's cutting works of satire are as well-loved today as they ever were.

Daphne Du Maurier

Daphne du Maurier (1907-89) was born in London and educated at home and in Paris. She lived most of her life in her beloved Cornwall, the setting for most of her novels.

E M Forster

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, attended Tonbridge School and went on to King's College, Cambridge in 1897, where he retained a lifelong connection and was elected to an Honorary Fellowship in 1946.He died in June 1970.

Elizabeth Goudge

Elizabeth de Beauchamp Goudge was born on April 24th 1900 in Wells, Somerset, where her father was Principal of Wells Theological College. Although she had privately intended writing as a career, her parents insisted she taught handicrafts in Oxford. She began writing in her spare time and her first novel ISLAND MAGIC, set in Guernsey, was a great success here and in America. GREEN DOLPHIN COUNTRY (1944) projected her to fame, netting a Literary Guild Award and a special prize of £30,000 from Louis B. Mayer of MGM before being filmed.In her later years Elizabeth Goudge settled in Henley-on-Thames. She died on April 1st, 1984.

George Eliot

George Eliot, born Mary Ann Evans was born on a farm in Warwickshire in 1819. After her father's death she travelled on the continent and returned to begin writing for the Westminster Review, becoming assistant editor in 1851. Eliot's novels, portraying farmers, traders and the lower middle classes, will always stand out among the greatest of the English school.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born in 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, where her father was rector. When she was 25 the family moved to Bath till her father's death in 1805, then to Chawton in Hampshire where Jane lived with her mother and sister. She wrote six novels. Sense and Sensibility was first in 1811, then Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma(1816). Northanger Abbey and Persusaion were both published posthumously, in 1817. Jane Austen died in 1817. Well-received during her lifetime, since her death she has become known as not just one of the greatest writers of English fiction, but one of the most beloved.

Jurgen Wolff

Jurgen Wolff is a writer, teacher, NLP practitioner and the author of many books, including Your Writing Coach, Successful Scriptwriting (60,000 copies sold) Creativity Now!, Focus: the power of targeted thinking, Do Something Different as well as a dozen plays. A consistently successful screenwriter, Wolff has sat on the writing team on the hit TV series LOST and many other successful HBO projects. He has consulted to TV companies around the world (BBC, SKY, Columbia/Tri-Star)and written for newspapers including The Times. He holds creativity workshops around the world for organizations such as the Academy for Chief Executives, the University of Barcelona, the Pilots Programme, the Bertelsmann Foundation, film schools in Cologne, Berlin, and Munich, and many others. Born and educated in the US, Wolff now divides his time between London and California.

L. P. Hartley

L. P. Hartley (1895-1972) was a British writer, described by Lord David Cecil as 'One of the most distinguished of modern novelists; and one of the most original'. His best-known work is The Go-Between, which was made into a 1970 film. Other works include The Betrayal, The Brickfield, The Boat, My Fellow Devils, A Perfect Woman and Eustace and Hilda, for which he was awarded the 1947 James Tait Black Memorial Prize. He was awarded the CBE in 1956.

Laura Carlin

Laura Carlin left school at 16 to work in retail banking and it was only after leaving her job to write full-time that she discovered her passion for storytelling and exploring pockets of history through fiction. She lives in a book-filled house in beautiful rural Derbyshire with her family (and a very naughty cat). When she's not writing she enjoys walking in the surrounding Peak District. The Wicked Cometh is her first novel.

Leo Tolstoy

Tolstoy was a champion of nonviolent protest. When he was two years of age his mother died, and when nine his father died. Tolstoy had a definitive set of ideas in regards to religion and philosophy. "Tolstoy condemned capitalism, private property, and the division of labour. Civilization in general he regarded as bad, emphasizing the need to make life as simple and primitive as possible." (Benet's.) His ideas led him into problems with his family, he was estranged from his family during the last of his life. Two of Tolstoy's most popular works are War & Peace and Anna Karenina.