Related to: 'Every Word is a Bird We Teach to Sing'

Julie Sarkissian blogs about the problems facing the protagnist of her debut novel, DEAR LUCY

Something's Wrong With Lucy - But What?

Lucy is different – that much is clear. She speaks like a child, doesn’t recognize social boundaries, flies into rages, and treasures rotten food. Her cognition is impaired, her vocabulary is very limited and she cannot read or write. But what – precisely – is wrong with her is left up to the reader. Lucy is the protagonist of my novel, DEAR LUCY, and from the first sentence of the book I ever wrote it was obvious that Lucy was cognitively different. The way Lucy describes herself is as “missing too many words.” Her mother calls her “difficult.” Readers of early drafts of the book had a few theories as to Lucy’s condition; autism, Williams Syndrome, Down Syndrome. But Lucy’s mother has kept her from going to school and Lucy has never seen a doctor. So in the fictional reality of the book there is no official diagnosis. But as the novel progressed I wondered – should I have one? I was torn. If Lucy was presenting enough symptoms to point to a real condition, was I ignoring the obvious not to fold that condition into my development of her character? Was it insensitive of me to allude to aspects of certain real, life-altering conditions but not assign a specific condition to Lucy? I worried about appropriating aspects of serious conditions without treating those conditions with proper respect and acknowledgement. And though any clinical diagnosis would probably not be explicit in the novel, I wondered if I would be ignoring an opportunity to bring attention to a real disorder when people asked me about Lucy’s condition, the way The Curious Incident of The Dog in the Night-time did for autism. On the other hand, I had concerns that if I chose a diagnosis for Lucy, I would be ascribing to her qualities that she wouldn’t have otherwise presented. Lucy had her own will over my writing and over the novel. I didn’t want to yoke Lucy’s expression by keeping her behavior and abilities consistent with a clinical condition. Accuracy would also become a critical issue if Lucy’s condition was named. Ultimately I chose not to diagnose Lucy, though I worry the artistic freedom provided by that decision comes at the price of being judged for being too liberal with my treatment of cognitive disorders. Now that publication is a few months away, I am apprehensive of how my treatment of Lucy’s cognitive limitations will be judged. I have yet to talk to a reader who has a learning different child, or works with learning different people, and that conversation is one I will be honored, and not a bit anxious, to have.

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Clover Stroud

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Gervase Phinn

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Giles Coren

Giles Coren has been a restaurant critic for The Times for the last ten years. Before that, he was restaurant critic of the Independent on Sunday. Before that, he was restaurant critic for Tatler. Before that, he was a journalist. In 2005, he was named Food and Drink Writer of the Year, published his first (and last) novel, Winkler and began presenting The F-Word on Channel 4 with Gordon Ramsay. Since then, he has presented a documentary series on biotechnology in the food chain (Animal Farm), a polemical film about the obesity crisis (Tax the Fat), and three series of The Supersizers Go...with Sue Perkins, who does the funny stuff whilst Coren eats his way through 2,000 years of food history with the table manners of a pig recently released from prison. His most recent television series, Our Food, aired on BBC2 in April 2012. He lives in Kentish Town with his wife, the writer Esther Walker, and his daughter, the toddler Kitty Coren, who recently developed a taste for good dim sum and will thus be allowed to stay.

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Graham Norton

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Henry Blofeld

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Henry Normal

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James Lovell

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