Related to: 'Aspects of the Novel'

Hodder & Stoughton

Maurice

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

As Maurice Hall makes his way through a traditional English education, he projects an outer confidence that masks troubling questions about his own identity. Frustrated and unfulfilled, a product of the bourgeoisie he will grow to despise, he has difficulty acknowledging his nascent attraction to men. At Cambridge he meets Clive, who opens his eyes to a less conventional view of the nature of love. Yet when Maurice is confronted by the societal pressures of life beyond university, self-doubt and heartbreak threaten his quest for happiness.

Hodder & Stoughton

Where Angels Fear to Tread

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

Hot-headed Lilia is seen as nothing but a vulgar source of embarrassment to her late husband's family, so her decision to embark on a year abroad in Tuscany is welcomed by her uptight and snobbish mother-in-law. Yet Lilia doesn't stay away from scandal long; her announcement that she is to marry the charismatic but ill-bred Gino is met with horror by the rest of the family. Their union ends in tragedy and violence as her English relatives confront their Italian counterparts, as well as their own cultural values, amidst the beauty of the Tuscan countryside.

Teach Yourself

Get Your Travel Writing Published

Cynthia Dial
Authors:
Cynthia Dial
Hodder & Stoughton

The Longest Journey

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

First published in 1907, The Longest Journey is the most personal of E.M. Forster's novels, and the one he was most glad to have written. Rickie Elliot, sensitive, idealistic and gifted with a powerful imagination, misleads him-self through his conventional desire for marriage and fatherhood. Falling for the beautiful yet superficial Agnes Pembroke, he gives up his writing ambitions and becomes a schoolmaster at a minor public school in order to marry her. So begins his journey away from the philosophical ideals of his Cambridge youth and his slow descent into a hollow world of rigid conformity and moral decay.

Hodder & Stoughton

A Room With a View

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

Set partly in Florence, partly in the Surrey hills, A ROOM WITH A VIEW depicts the struggle for the soul of its enchanting heroine, Lucy Honeychuch. Forster's brilliant social comedy examines the English abroad and at home in the country as Lucy's sincere and passionate feelings are contrasted with her prudish cousin Charlotte, her supercilious fiancé and the unconventional Emersons.A Room with a View, originally published in 1908, was made into a Merchant/Ivory film starring Denholm Elliot, Maggie Smith, Helena Bonham-Carter, Judi Dench and Daniel Day Lewis.

Hodder & Stoughton

Howards End

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster
Hodder & Stoughton

A Passage to India

E M Forster
Authors:
E M Forster

Adam Roberts

Adam Roberts is the author of 14 SF novels, most recently Jack Glass (which won the UK BSFA and the US John Campbell awards for best SF novel, 2013), as well as a number of critical works about science fiction, including Science Fiction (Routledge, 2000) and The Palgrave History of Science Fiction (Palgrave 2006). He regularly reviews the genre for The Guardian and is also a Professor of 19th-century Literature at Royal Holloway, University of London; where he also teaches Creative Writing to undergraduates, specialising in 3rd-year final projects in SF and Fantasy.

Barbara Reynolds

An Italian scholar and translator, Barbara Reynolds completed the translation of Dante's Divine Comedy which Dorothy L. Sayers left unfinished when she died. Dr Reynolds has told the story of this collaboration in The Passionate Intellect: Dorothy L. Sayers' Encounter with Dante. She has also translated Dante's La Vita Nuova and Ariosto's Orlando Furioso, and was the general editor of The Cambridge Italian Dictionary. More recently, Dr Reynolds founded the journal Seven, to which she has contributed articles on Dorothy L. Sayers. She is the President of the Dorothy L. Sayers Society.

Barbara Samuel

Barbara Samuel is the bestselling author of more than 40 books. In 2012, she was inducted into the Romance Writers of America Hall Of Fame, and she has won seven RITA awards (most recently in 2012) and her books have been published in more than a dozen countries. One of her recent women's fiction titles, The Lost Recipe for Happiness (written as Barbara O'Neal) was reprinted eight times, and her book How to Bake a Perfect Life was a Target Club pick in 2011.

Chris Sykes

Chris Sykes is a playwright, writer and poet who has written for the BBC and has had his plays performed in the West End. He also teaches creative writing at the University of Sussex and was Deputy Chair of The Writers Guild of Great Britain.

E M Forster

Edward Morgan Forster was born in London in 1879, attended Tonbridge School and went on to King's College, Cambridge in 1897, where he retained a lifelong connection and was elected to an Honorary Fellowship in 1946.He died in June 1970.

Jane Austen

Jane Austen was born in 1775, in Steventon, Hampshire, where her father was rector. When she was 25 the family moved to Bath till her father's death in 1805, then to Chawton in Hampshire where Jane lived with her mother and sister. She wrote six novels. Sense and Sensibility was first in 1811, then Pride and Prejudice (1813), Mansfield Park (1814) and Emma(1816). Northanger Abbey and Persusaion were both published posthumously, in 1817. Jane Austen died in 1817. Well-received during her lifetime, since her death she has become known as not just one of the greatest writers of English fiction, but one of the most beloved.

John Connolly

John Connolly is author of the Charlie Parker mysteries, The Book of Lost Things, the Samuel Johnson novels for young adults and, with his partner, Jennifer Ridyard, co-author of the Chronicles of the Invaders. John Connolly's debut - EVERY DEAD THING - introduced the character of Private Investigator Charlie Parker, and swiftly launched him right into the front rank of thriller writers. All his subsequent novels have been Sunday Times bestsellers. He was the winner of the 2016 CWA Short Story Dagger for On the Anatomization of an Unknown Man (1637) by Frans Mier from NIGHT MUSIC: Nocturnes Vol 2.In 2007 he was awarded the Irish Post Award for Literature. He was the first non-American writer to win the US Shamus award and the first Irish writer to win an Edgar award. BOOKS TO DIE FOR, which he edited with Declan Burke, was the winner of the 2013 Anthony, Agatha and Macavity awards for Best Non-Fiction work.

Judith Watts

Judith Watts is a Senior Lecturer in Publishing at Kingston University and has also worked in traditional publishing houses. She's an editor and a published poet, performing erotic verse for a range of unsuspecting audiences.

Mirren Baxter

Mirren Baxter has taught creative writing for years and works with small groups of writers to develop their manuscripts towards publication.

Robert A. Heinlein

Robert A. Heinlein was the grand master of science fiction in the twentieth century. Over the course of his long career he won numerous awards and many of his novels have cemented their place in history as science fiction classics, including STARSHIP TROOPERS, THE MOON IS A HARSH MISTRESS, and the beloved STRANGER IN A STRANGE LAND.

Stephen King

Stephen King is the author of more than sixty books, all of them worldwide bestsellers. His recent work includes Sleeping Beauties (co-written with his son Owen King), the short story collection The Bazaar of Bad Dreams, the Bill Hodges trilogy End of Watch, Finders Keepers, and Mr. Mercedes (an Edgar Award winner for Best Novel, and shortlisted for the CWA Gold Dagger Award). Many of King's books have been turned into celebrated films, television series and streamed events including The Shawshank Redemption, Gerald's Game and It.King is the recipient of the 2014 National Medal of Arts and the 2003 National Book Foundation Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters. He lives in Bangor, Maine, with his wife, novelist Tabitha King.

Stephen May

Stephen May is a teacher of Creative Writing, former Director of the Arvon Centre at Lumb Bank, one-time scriptwriter for Emmerdale and respected author. His second novel, 'Life! Death! Prizes!' was shortlisted for the 2012 Costa Novel Award.

Thomas Keneally

Thomas Keneally began his writing career in 1964 and has published thirty-one novels since. They include Schindler's Ark, which won the Booker Prize in 1982 and was subsequently made into the film Schindler's List, and The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith, Confederates and Gossip From The Forest, each of which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent novels are The Daughters Of Mars, which was shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize in 2013, Shame and the Captives and Crimes of the Father. He has also written several works of non-fiction, including his memoir Homebush Boy, Searching for Schindler and Australians. He is married with two daughters and lives in Sydney.