Search results for: 'Peter Robinson'

Hodder & Stoughton

Many Rivers to Cross

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson

A young Middle Eastern boy is dead - his body stuffed in a wheelie bin on the East Side Estate. Detective Superintendent Banks and his team are called to investigate this case whose profile increases even further when they realise he was stabbed elsewhere and dumped. Who is the boy, and where did he come from? Then a heroin addict is found dead of an overdose in an area of town scheduled for redevelopment as a shopping centre, and, while trying not to be distracted by his concern for his friend Zelda's increasingly dangerous situation, Banks discovers a connection with a shady property developer. Finding a solution to the case may come at a terrible cost...

Hodder & Stoughton

Careless Love

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson
Hodder & Stoughton

Sleeping in the Ground

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson

The twenty fourth instalment in Peter Robinson's Number One Bestselling Banks Series. A terrible crime. No obvious motive. Banks is on the case.The Alan Banks mystery-suspense novels are the best series on the market. Try one and tell me I'm wrong. - Stephen King'Top-notch police procedure' - Jeffery DeaverA shocking mass murder occurs at a wedding in a small Dales church and a huge manhunt follows. Eventually, the shooter is run to ground and things take their inevitable course.But Banks is plagued with doubts as to exactly what happened outside the church that day, and why. Struggling with the death of his first serious girlfriend and the return of profiler Jenny Fuller into his life, Banks feels the need to dig deeper into the murders, and as he does so, he uncovers forensic and psychological puzzles that lead him to the past secrets that might just provide the answers he is looking for. When the surprising truth becomes clear, it is almost too late.

Hodder & Stoughton

When the Music's Over

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson
Hodder & Stoughton

Abattoir Blues

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson

The twenty second instalment of the grisly bestselling DCI Banks series. Also an award winning TV series starring Stephen Tompkinson. Two missing boys.A stolen bolt gun.One fatal shot.Three ingredients for murder.Misled from the start, DCI Banks and his team are far from enthusiastic when they're called to investigate the theft of a tractor. But this is no trivial case of rural crime. A blood stain is found in an abandoned hangar, two main suspects vanish without a trace, and events take a darkly sinister turn.As each lead does little to unravel the mystery, Banks feels like the case is coming to a dead end. Until a road accident reveals some alarming evidence, which throws the investigation to a frightening new level.Someone is trying to cover their tracks - someone with very deadly intent . . .'Classic Robinson: labyrinthine plot merged with deft characterisation' - The Observer

Hodder Paperbacks

Bad Boy

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Hodder & Stoughton

Children of the Revolution

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson
Hodder & Stoughton

Watching the Dark

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson

Banks is back his twentieth mystery - and this time he's investigating the murder of one of his own. Detective Inspector Bill Quinn is killed by a crossbow in the tranquil grounds of a police rehabilitation centre, and compromising photos are found in his room.  DCI Banks, brought in to investigate, is assailed on all sides. By Joanna Passero, the Professional Standards inspector who insists on shadowing the investigation in case of police corruption. By his own conviction that a policeman shouldn't be deemed guilty without evidence. By Annie Cabbot, back at work after six months' recuperation, and beset by her own doubts and demons. And by an English girl who disappeared in Estonia six years ago, who seems to hold the secret at the heart of this case . . .

Hodder & Stoughton

Friend of the Devil

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson

When Karen Drew is found sitting in her wheelchair staring out to sea with her throat cut one chilly morning, DI Annie Cabbot, on loan to Eastern Area, gets lumbered with the case. Back in Eastvale, that same Sunday morning, 19-year-old Hayley Daniels is found raped and strangled in the Maze, a tangle of narrow alleys behind Eastvale's market square, after a drunken night on the town with a group of friends, and DCI Alan Banks is called in. Banks finds suspects galore, while Annie seems to hit a brick wall - until she reaches a breakthrough that spins her case in a shocking and surprising new direction, one that also involves Banks. Then another incident occurs in the Maze which seems to link the two cases in a bizarre and mysterious way. As Banks and Annie dig into the past to uncover the deeper connections, they find themselves also dealing with the emotional baggage and personal demons of their own relationship. And it soon becomes clear that there are two killers in their midst, and that at any moment either one might strike again. (P)2012 ISIS Publishing Ltd

Hodder & Stoughton

Before the Poison

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson

The Number One bestseller and winner of the Arthur Ellis Award for Best NovelAfter years of Hollywood success composer Chris Lowndes wanted only one thing: to take his beloved wife home to the Yorkshire Dales.But Laura is gone, and Chris is on his own.He welcomes the isolation of Kilnsgate House, and the beauty of the dale. And it doesn't surprise him that a man died there, sixty years ago.That his wife was convicted of murder.That something is pulling him deeper and deeper into the story of Grace Elizabeth Fox, who was hanged by the neck until she was dead . . .

Hodder & Stoughton

The Price of Love

Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson, Peter Robinson

When DCI Alan Banks arrived in Eastvale his life was every bit as much of a mess as it is now. But he is holding an envelope that could change everything he understood about the events that sent him north twenty years ago.Walking again the narrow alleys and backstreets of his mind, he remembers the seedy Soho nights of his last case - dubious businessmen in dodgy clubs, young girls on the game. And a killer on the loose.In addition to the brand-new novella that fills in the gaps in Banks's life before Yorkshire, Peter Robinson gives us ten more brilliant and eclectic stories that have never before been published in the UK. The Eastvale Ladies' Poker Circle finds that murder may be just another game of risk. Is a suitcase of cash worth a man's head on a plate? And tragedy leads a young boy to learn the price of love . . .

Hodder & Stoughton

Piece of My Heart

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson
Hodder & Stoughton

All the Colours of Darkness

Peter Robinson
Authors:
Peter Robinson

The eighteenth instalment in the bestselling DCI Banks seriesA beautiful June day in the Yorkshire Dales, and a group of children are spending the last of their half-term freedom swimming in the river near Hindswell Woods. But the idyll is shattered by their discovery of a man's body, hanging from a tree. DI Annie Cabott soon discovers he is Mark Hardcastle, the well-liked and successful set designer for the Eastvale Theatres current production of Othello. Everything points to suicide, and Annie is mystified. Why would such a man want to take his own life? Then Annie's investigation leads to another shattering discovery, and DCI Alan Banks is called back from the idyllic weekend he had planned with his new girlfriend. Banks soon finds himself plunged into a shadow-world where nothing is what it seems, where secrets and deceit are the norm, and where murder is seen as the solution to a problem. The deeper he digs the more he discovers that the monster he has awakened will extend its deadly reach to his friends and family. Nobody is safe.

Peter Robinson

Peter Robinson's DCI Banks is now a major ITV1 drama starring Stephen Tompkinson (Wild at Heart, Ballykissangel) as Inspector Banks, and Andrea Lowe (The Bill, Murphy's Law) as DI Annie Cabbot. Peter's standalone novel BEFORE THE POISON won the IMBA's 2013 Dilys Award as well as the 2012 Arthur Ellis Award for Best Novel by the Crime Writers of Canada. This was Peter's sixth Arthur Ellis award. His critically acclaimed DCI Banks novels have won numerous awards in Britain, the United States, Canada and Europe, and are published in translation all over the world.Peter grew up in Yorkshire, and now divides his time between Richmond and Canada. Peter keeps a website at www.inspectorbanks.com.

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By publicist Kerry Hood

On set with Peter Robinson and DCI Banks

DCI is being brought to life in an ITV adaptation of one of his novels. His publicist, Kerry Hood, made a visit to the set to bring us up to speed on what to expect from Peter Robinson's first TV adaptation.

Peter Robinson on Google+

Find out more about DCI Banks on Google+

Peter Robinson on the DCI Banks TV series

When I first heard that Left Bank were going to produce a pilot based on the Banks books, I was excited. For years the books had been kicked from option to option, and I had just about given up hope of ever seeing them realised on any screen, small or large. Although Stephen Tompkinson didn’t conform to my idea of what Banks should look like, it was never an important issue with me. Everyone who reads the books has a different idea of each character’s appearance, and to please them all you’d have to have make . . . well, thousands of different versions! That’s one difference between novels and TV. Novels leave the readers to fill in part of the picture – you have to do some of the work yourself – but with TV you get the whole picture, and there’s little room left for your imagination. I was pleased with the pilot, and with the first and second series. Sure, they changed a lot of things, but that’s only to be expected. TV adaptations and books are as different as chalk and cheese. All the things readers like about the novels – such as Banks sitting around listening to music, drinking wine and mulling things over – disappear, and what you get is plot-driven, fast-paced entertainment. But I do think Stephen manages to capture the essence of Banks’s character very well. Andrea Lowe, who plays Annie Cabbot, was unable to appear in most of the second series because she was in the late stages of pregnancy. In her place, the producers brought in DI Helen Morton, played by Caroline Catz. I like Helen Morton – she’s a strange character, reminiscent of Saga Noren in The Bridge, only with a husband and children – but I didn’t write her. I like Caroline Catz, too. She is a popular, and very good, actress, and it comes as no surprise that the producers want her to stay on. When Annie comes back, plus baby, in the third series now being filmed, there are bound to be plenty of fireworks between her and DI Morton. I’m sure the viewers will enjoy them. I know I will. Sometimes though, I feel as if it is all slipping away from me. So many people are part of it – from the crew to the cast, writers, producers and directors – that things could hardly be any other way. I continue to take an interest in the scripts, watch the series, visit the set and meet up with everyone involved whenever I can, but my main job is to write the books. To do that, I have to put DI Morton, Annie’s baby and all the rest out of my mind and return to a man sitting by himself in an isolated cottage, looking out on the Yorkshire Dales, sipping an Aussie shiraz, listening to a Schubert string quartet, an old Miles Davis or Pink Floyd CD or the latest Richard Thompson, mulling things over. That’s my Banks, not theirs, and it’s important for me to know the difference. Long may they both thrive!

Leslie Charteris's The Saint Steps In

Peter Robinson's introduction for

‘Sanctity does have its rewards.’ Whenever I think of the Saint, I can’t help but remember those magical Saturday mornings of my adolescence. In the early sixties, one of the highlights of my week was a Saturday morning visit to Stringers Book Exchange, in the bustling Kirkgate Market in Leeds. I would wander down the aisles listening to the stall holders shouting out their sales pitches for housewares and bolts of cloth, assailed on all sides by the smells of slightly rotten fruit and vegetables, perhaps stopping to pick up the latest Record Song Book or Melody Maker at the news stand, then I would wander on past the glistening slabs of marbled red meat displayed on the butchers’ stalls, and finally get to Stringers, where box after box of paperback books lay spread out on the trestle tables. The system was simple: Whatever you bought, you could bring back when you had finished it and get half the price you paid for it against a new purchase. Even back then, I liked to hang on to most of the books I bought, so I don’t think I took full advantage of the exchange feature. I was usually on the lookout for anything exciting – horror stories, spy stories, science fiction and crime thrillers, mostly. One of my favourites was the Saint. My eagle eye was always scanning the stacks for the stick figure with the halo, and I’m quite certain that The Saint Steps In was among one of the many Leslie Charteris books I bought there and didn’t take back to exchange. For me, the Saint beats his countless competitors – the Toff, the Baron, Sexton Blake, Bulldog Drummond et al –hands down, and he has remained one of the most enduring and best loved figures in popular culture. I wish I still had my tattered old Saint paperback collection today, but after so many years and so many moves, covering two continents, it’s a wonder I have anything left from those days at all. But now, after so many years out of print, when they were available only in obscure omnibus editions, and practically impossible to find at even the most accommodating of second-handbook shops, it’s good to have the whole series coming back in handsome and accessible paperback editions. At last, the Saint receives his due. Many people will remember the TV series, starring Roger Moore, which aired from 1962 to 1969. Good as the series was, and terrific as Sir Roger was in the title role, which fit him far more comfortably than did James Bond, there remains a huge difference between the TV Saint and the character in the books. Though most of the early black and white episodes were based on Charteris’ stories, they were adapted by a number of different screen writers and, as happens in the world of TV, often ended up being changed beyond recognition. The later, colour episodes were almost all based on original scripts, and though the Saint remained elegantly roguish and debonair throughout, he lacked some of the rougher and more foolhardy edges his character demonstrated in the books. The Saint in the books is much more violent, for example. In The Saint Steps In, Simon Templar is quite happy to keep on beating a man to a pulp, and perhaps even to pour boiling water and nitric acid over his feet, to get information, but we are given to believe that he only does that to people he knows would do the same to him! And he swears like a trooper. Charteris never gives us the actual words, of course, but his description of the string of expletives Templar unleashes when he loses a suspect is unmistakable. There was definitely a whiff of the London underworld about Simon Templar when he first emerged in the late 1920s, along with that ‘faint hint of mockery behind his clear blue eyes,’ and it stays with him throughout the series, despite the veneer of civilisation and the expensive tastes. Though he is on the side of the law, he isn’t above bending it to suit his own particular sense of justice, and while he might have played Robin Hood on occasion, his lifestyle is certainly lavish, to say the least! Though television may capture some of the witty banter of Charteris’ dialogue, it cannot reproduce the energy and playfulness of his use of language in general. He clearly loved words, loved puns, alliteration and metaphors, and his books are peppered with them. A lunch at the Grand Central Station Oyster Bar, for example, becomes, ‘He was driven by pangs of purely prosaic hunger to the Oyster Bar, where he took his time over the massacre of several inoffensive molluscs.’ As teenagers, we used to repeat these phrases to one another, and they never failed to provoke howls of laughter. Leslie Charteris moved to the USA in 1932. His first book to be set there was The Saint in New York (1935), which was followed by a number of European adventures before he returned to the USA for The Saint in Miami (1940), then The Saint Goes West (1942), which immediately precedes The Saint Steps In, which finds him moving between Washington DC, New York and Stamford, Connecticut. The book was originally serialised in Liberty Magazine in 1942, and published in volume form a year later by Hodder in the UK. The plot, such as it is, wouldn’t be out of place in an Alfred Hitchcock movie: North by Northwest, for example. A beautiful but straitlaced and enigmatic young woman called Madeline Gray comes to ask for Simon Templar’s help when she receives a threatening note. It appears that her father has invented a form of synthetic rubber that would be useful for the war effort – not to mention immensely profitable to whoever possesses it after the war – and she wants to make sure it ends up in the right hands. The formula becomes what Hitchcock called the ‘McGuffin,’ the highly sought after documents or plans that set the events of the plot in motion. Everybody wants them, but we don’t always know why, or even what they are. Soon, Templar gets a threatening note too, and then there is a scuffle in the street when it appears that someone is trying to abduct Madeline. When Templar and Madeline get to Stamford, they find that her father is missing, and then the plot thickens . . . In contrast to Madeline Gray, we also meet the rather less wholesome Andrea Quennel, who has ‘the build and beauty and colouring that Wagner was probably dreaming of before the divas took over.’ Charteris clearly enjoyed writing his descriptions of Andrea, especially her clothes, and this is where he gets to show off his love of metaphor to best advantage. ‘She wore a soft creamy sweater that clung like suds to every curve of her upper sculpture, and her lips were full and inviting.’ Charteris also has an eye for the nuances. Later in the book, Andrea wears a kind of dress that ‘would get by anywhere between a ballroom and a boudoir and still always have a faint air of belonging somewhere else.’ Throughout the book, Andrea offers the Saint anything he wants, and Madeline withholds herself. By the time of the events recounted in The Saint Steps In (1943), Simon Templar is ruing the fact that he is now far more widely known than he used to be. This he blames on the war. Instead of donning a military uniform in order to serve the Allies against the Axis powers, he has so far worked mostly behind the scenes, and has had to forge working relationships with government departments and security agencies he would once have shied away from. His new-found fame doesn’t seem to do him much harm, although he laments being ‘almost legal,’ as he still manages to carry on much as he likes. The only difference is that now he does it with the cooperation of the authorities. In The Saint Steps In, he even works with the F.B.I. How ironic Inspector Teal would find that! The presence of the war permeates The Saint Steps In, even from a distance, holding it together and providing some of its more serious moments, as when Templar contrasts the peace and beauty of New England with the distant horrors of war, the slaughter going on in Europe and the Far East. As he puts it, with characteristic understatement, ‘all that the paranoia of an unsuccessful house-painter was trying to destroy.’ Templar also becomes quite eloquent in an argument towards the end of the book, when he argues that most Americans only perceive the war as a distant event that doesn’t impinge too much on their daily lives because they haven’t felt its effects at first hand, as London did in the blitz. One wonders here where Charteris’ voice ends and Templar’s begins. Like most of the Saint stories, The Saint Steps In is a novel of adventure, mixing mystery and suspense with a fair amount of action and snappy dialogue in the vein of Raymond Chandler, whose The Lady in the Lake came out the same year. Also around the same time, RKO Pictures had more or less plagiarised the Saint for the movies and rechristened him the Falcon, with George Sanders (an ex-movie Saint) in the title role. Oddly enough, the third Falcon film, The Falcon Takes Over (1942), was based on Chandler’s Farewell, My Lovely – so, in a strange way, the Saint became Philip Marlowe, however briefly! Unlike Marlowe, though, Simon Templar doesn’t have the dubious respectability of a private detective’s licence; he does, however, have the same sense of himself as an adventurer, a sort of knight errant, as a man who, in Chandler’s words, is ‘a man of honor, by instinct, by inevitability, without thought of it, and certainly without saying it . . . The best man in his world and a good enough man for any world.’ He is, after all, the Saint.

On DCI Banks's retirement, Yorkshire and what's next.

Q&A with Peter Robinson

1) Is DCI Alan Banks an old friend you enjoy coming back to or an old friend you enjoy saying goodbye to occasionally? Definitely an old friend I enjoy coming back to! But every author needs to freshen up his ideas, so there are books that need to be written every now and then that divert from Banks and this allow me a breather. And I honestly think the books are all the better for it. 2) On the subject of age – you have him facing retirement or promotion … Retirement … really?! Banks won’t want to retire, so he’ll certainly keep on doing what he is doing, and I’m sure I can find a way to do this. After all, he can have several cases in one year, which can run across several books, can’t he? He doesn’t have to age with me – which is rather irritating, I suppose! 3) You are giving Annie Cabbot a hard time at the moment. Do you think you might give her a break soon? Hmmmm … not in the next book, no. She is aware that the shooting has made her an edgier personality. She wants to get back to the Annie that she knows she is – but it will take a few books and it will be an interesting progression for all of us. 4) You now spend a little more time in Yorkshire – does it feel as though you’ve never been away? Nope. Certainly the countryside changes a lot more slowly than the cities. Leeds always feels different – it moves much faster. The villages and towns change a lot slower as I’m aware it does all around the country. It is good to see more of it, though, and I’ll be dipping into the filming of the next Banks drama series over the next month or so, I hope. 5) Is there a Peter Robinson novel set in Canada? Would it be very different in tone to those set in the UK? There isn’t. If there were, it would be very different to those set in Yorkshire. Probably it would be a hard look at Toronto life. We don’t have a lot of murders there - it is a small murder rate compared to the US cities of the same size. Maybe, one day … 6) What’s next? Another Banks novel, and it’s about a stolen tractor, a muddle of bodies – both animal and human… and more!