Related to: 'Sabine Durrant'

Mulholland Books

Take Me In

Sabine Durrant
Authors:
Sabine Durrant

The sensational new thriller from the author of the Richard & Judy bestseller Lie With Me.A hot beach. A young family on holiday. A fatal moment of inattention...And now Dave Jepsom is in their lives.Dave Jepsom, with his muscles, his pale eyes, his expressionless face.He saved their child. How can they ever repay him? Especially as what he seems to want in return is everything.He's in the streets they walk down. He's at the office where they work. He's at their front door, leaning on the bell...If only they could go back. Back to when the lies were still hidden. Before the holiday, before the beach, before the moment that changed everything.Before Dave.But it's never how it starts that matters. It's always how it ends.

Two Roads

The Keeper of Lost Things

Ruth Hogan
Authors:
Ruth Hogan

*WINNER OF RICHARD AND JUDY AUTUMN BOOK CLUB 2017 - 'One of the most charming novels either of us has read. Don't lose it. Keep it' Richard & Judy**The perfect holiday read, recommended by thousands of readers**One of the Mail on Sunday's 'Best books for the beach this summer'*Meet the 'Keeper of Lost Things'...Once a celebrated author of short stories now in his twilight years, Anthony Peardew has spent half his life collecting lost objects, trying to atone for a promise broken many years before.Realising he is running out of time, he leaves his house and all its lost treasures to his assistant Laura, the one person he can trust to fulfil his legacy and reunite the thousands of objects with their rightful owners.But the final wishes of the 'Keeper of Lost Things' have unforeseen repercussions which trigger a most serendipitous series of encounters...'The first book I read in 2017 - and if another as good comes along in the next 12 months, I'll eat my special gold reviewing spectacles' Daily MailAnd if you loved The Keeper of Lost Things, don't miss Ruth Hogan's second novel The Particular Wisdom of Sally Red Shoes, now available for pre-order

Two Roads

Can you hear me?

Elena Varvello
Authors:
Elena Varvello

'Utterly gripped me from beginning to end' Victoria Hislop'Move over Ferrante, there's a new Elena in town' Independent'There is much beauty and sadness in this slim novel' The Times'A novel of crime and darkness that eschews straightforward domestic noir' GuardianIn the August of 1978, the summer I met Anna Trabuio, my father took a girl into the woods...I was sixteen.He had been gone a long time already, but that was it - not even a year after he lost his job and that boy disappeared - that was when everything broke.1978. Ponte, a small community in Northern Italy. An unbearably hot summer like many others.Elia Furenti is sixteen, living an unremarkable life of moderate unhappiness, until the day the beautiful, damaged Anna returns to Ponte and firmly propels Elia to the edge of adulthood. But then everything starts to unravel.Elia's father, Ettore, is let go from his job and loses himself in the darkest corners of his mind.A young boy is murdered.And a girl climbs into a van and vanishes in the deep, dark woods...Translated by Alex Valente | Winner of an English PEN Award

Mulholland Books

Lie With Me

Sabine Durrant
Authors:
Sabine Durrant
Mulholland Books

Remember Me This Way

Sabine Durrant
Authors:
Sabine Durrant
Two Roads

Corpus Christi

Bret Anthony Johnston
Authors:
Bret Anthony Johnston

'A gorgeous, accomplished debut' David MitchellBy internationally bestselling author Bret Anthony Johnston, WINNER of the Sunday Times EFG Short Story Award 2017.In Corpus Christi, Texas - a town often hit by hurricanes - parents, children, and lovers come together and fall apart, bonded and battered by memories of loss that they feel as acutely as physical pain.A car accident joins strangers linked by an intimate knowledge of madness. A teenage boy remembers his father's act of sudden and self-righteous violence. A 'hurricane party' reunites a couple whom tragedy parted. And, in an unforgettable three-story cycle, an illness heals a man's relationship with his mother and reveals the odd, shifting fidelity of truth to love.Writing with tough humor, deep humanity, and a keen eye for the natural environment, Bret Anthony Johnston creates a world where cataclysmic events cut people loose from their 'regular lives, floating and spiraling away from where we had been the day before.'

Two Roads

Remember Me Like This

Bret Anthony Johnston
Authors:
Bret Anthony Johnston

'I love this novel' John Irving - 'Excellent' Sunday Times - 'enthralling' New York Times A powerful and affecting novel of a family which has moved readers everywhere. What happens to a family when a lost child returns? In the four years since Justin's abduction his family has become a group of separate units, each nursing their pain and guilt. Now, when they should be at their happiest, how can they forgive each other and become a family again? A gripping literary novel with the pace of a thriller, Remember Me Like This introduces Bret Anthony Johnston as a gifted storyteller. With his sophisticated and emotionally taut plot Johnston reveals how only in caring for each other, can we save ourselves.

Mulholland Books

Under Your Skin

Sabine Durrant
Authors:
Sabine Durrant

A gripping psychological thriller for fans of Clare Mackintosh and Shari LaPena, from the bestselling author of Lie With Me.'You'll be glued to every page' Closer It's true what they say: one moment can change your life completely. I found a woman's body on the common. I touched her; that was all.But now the police won't leave me alone. Because all the evidence is leading to me. And I don't know who I can trust... Gaby Mortimer thought she had a perfect life: a high-powered job, loving husband, beautiful daughter. But then early one morning she discovers the body of a murdered woman - a woman who looks like her, and seems to be wearing her clothes... 'Will keep you gripped and guessing till the very end.' Grazia

Hodder & Stoughton

What Should We Tell Our Daughters?

Melissa Benn
Authors:
Melissa Benn

We have reached a tricky crossroads in modern women's lives and our collective daughters are bearing the brunt of some intolerable pressures. Although feminism has made great strides forward since our mothers' and grandmothers' day, many of the key issues - equality of pay, equality in the home, representation at senior level in the private, public and political sectors - remain to be tackled. Casual sexism in the media and in everyday life is still rife and our daughters face a host of new difficulties as they are bombarded by images of unrealistically skinny airbrushed supermodels, celebrity role-models who depend on their looks and partners for status, and by competitive social media. The likes of Natasha Walter and Katie Roiphe deal with feminism from an adult point of view, but our daughters need to be prepared for stresses that are coming into play now as early as pre-school. This is a manifesto for every mother who has ever had to comfort a daughter who doesn't feel 'pretty', for every young woman who out-performs her male peers professionally and wonders why she is still not taken seriously, and for anyone interested in the world we are making for the next generation.

Hodder Paperbacks

The Burning Air

Erin Kelly
Authors:
Erin Kelly
Hodder Paperbacks

The Last Child

John Hart
Authors:
John Hart

Thirteen-year-old Johnny Merrimon has to face things no boy his age should face. In the year since his twin sister's abduction his world has fallen apart: his father has disappeared and his fragile mother is spiralling into ever deeper despair.Johnny keeps strong. Armed with a map, a bike and a flashlight, he stalks the bad men of Raven County. The police might have given up on Alyssa; he never will. Someone, somewhere, knows something they're not telling.Only one person looks out for Johnny. Detective Clyde Hunt shares his obsession with the case. But when Johnny witnesses a hit-and-run and insists the victim was killed because he'd found Alyssa, even Hunt thinks he's lost it.And then another young girl goes missing . . .

Chapter One

COME SUNDAY, by Isla Morley

Read the first chapter of Isla Morley's COME SUNDAY.

Exciting Crime and Thriller books for 2014

Our editors have listed the crime and thriller books we should all be looking out for in 2014. The Skin Collector by Jeffery Deaver The brand spanking new Lincoln Rhyme and hugely anticipated follow-up to The Bone Collector. Trust us, it’s Deaver’s creepiest – and most exhilarating – book yet. The Telling Error by Sophie Hannah Unlock the dark side of your mind: Queen of psychological crime Sophie Hannah is back with a new literary mystery and a puzzle that's impossible to solve . . . The Three by Sarah Lotz Four planes crash, & only three children survive, out of hundreds of passengers. Are they lucky innocents? Or harbingers of the apocalypse? Zodiac Station by Tom Harper A bloody, exhausted man is picked up off the Arctic ice & tells a story of jealousy, secrets and murder. But can he be trusted? Enemies at Home by Lindsey Davis The second Flavia Albia Falco mystery finds Albia thrown into a new mystery before she’s even had time to recover from the last one. The Fifth Season by Mons Kallentoft A new case for the brilliant female detective Malin Fors brings back memories of the one mystery she was never able to solve, and which has haunted her ever since – that of Maria Murvall, whom we met in Kallentoft’s very first novel, the Richard & Judy bestseller Midwinter Sacrifice. Now That You're Gone by Julie Corbin A new psychological suspense novel that will have you constantly looking over your shoulder and wondering, What would I do if it happened to me? Lonely Graves by Britta Bolt A new crime series set in Amsterdam, about the city’s real-life Lonely Funerals team who deal with the abandoned and unknown dead A Love Like Blood by Marcus Sedgwick YA star Marcus Sedgwick’s first book for adults –a love story, a thriller, a story of fear and truth and revenge. And it is also about the question of blood. Remember Me This Way by Sabine Durrant The new psychological thriller from Sabine Durrant, author of Under Your Skin. Some marriages are only perfect on the outside… Confessions by Kanae Minato The bestselling Japanese phenomenon: the story of a bereaved mother who plans to teach her daughter’s killers a lesson they’ll never forget. The One You Love by Paul Pilkington The trilogy begins when Emma Holden’s fiancé goes missing days before their wedding. Dan is missing and his brother has been beaten and left for dead. Emma can feel that someone is watching her, and a long-hidden family secret puts her relationship through the ultimate test. Paul Pilkington The Devil In The Marshalsea by Antonia Hodgson A compelling debut set in a debtors' prison in Georgian England. The Secret Place by Tana French The most stunning novel yet from this dazzlingly good author. Those Who Wish Me Dead by Michael Koryta Michael Koryta delivers on all the promise with a masterpiece of suspense. Vagabond by Gerald Seymour A searing return to the Northern Ireland of Harry's Game and The Journeyman Tailor Plague Land by S D Sykes A sparkling debut historical novel set against the changing society and landscape of an England devastated by the Black Death.

Chapter One: Mary

SNAKE ROPES, by Jess Richards

Read the first chapter of Jess Richards' SNAKE ROPES.

Things you overhear as a thriller writer. . .

Sabine Durrant - Overheard conversations

IF YOU are interested in the ins and outs of human behaviour, few things are more fascinating than the conversations of people sitting next to you in a cafe. It is part crossword puzzle - the deciphering of this particular relationship - and part psychoanalysis. Why did she say that? What is he really getting at? The way we can say one thing and mean another: this truism is so much more obvious when you are not actually engaged in the conversation yourself. Or to me it is. Weirdly, as we are leaving, I often discover my partner doesn’t share my opinion about the marriage of the couple at the next table. Sometimes he hasn’t even noticed there was a couple at the next table. I have spent a lot more time than usual in cafes over the last few weeks. I have a novel to finish, a thriller, and we have the builders in. The house is noisy and a man is liable to appear at a window at any moment. Normally I wouldn’t mind a man appearing at the window, but it can be disarming when you are in the middle of a creepy passage. My new book is about an abusive relationship, the possibility of pseudosuicide (pretending you are dead when you are not), the dark side of human nature, but I have been writing it in cosy nooks in south London, helped on my way by a nice cup of coffee and the smell of baking. And the thing is - and I know it might be because, as I am supposed to be working, I am, unusually, trying [start itals]not[end itals] to listen - but I have noticed this odd thing. The conversations around me have started to take a rather sinister turn. The other day, I was in Lavish Habit in Balham where they sell jewellery and bits of vintage furniture (as well as delicious coconut toast). A young couple eating lunch were idly discussing their future (“I think I could live in Bath”; “Yeah. I could live in Bath. But not ‘til I’m much older, like 30”) when the woman, a petite brunette in clumpy wedge shoes, mentioned she had just declined a party invitation. The man put down his knife and fork and adjusted the neck of his close-fitting polo-shirt. “Did you even mention me?” “Why? You’ve got to come up with your own excuse.” “We’re a couple aren’t we? We either go together or not at all. Not to is ... it’s not... coupling.” “I’d still go if you were busy.” “Would you?” “Yes.” “You wouldn’t.”
“I would.”
“You wouldn’t.” I felt uncomfortable. Was I just imagining the threat implicit in the repetition of “wouldn’t”? He was just staring at her. She just carried on eating her quiche and salad, but in my own head I fast-forwarded to their life in Bath, aged 30, her isolated from her friends, her family, his increasing demands... Later, three women with babies bustled through the door - a lot of pram negotiation, and chair-scraping. They sat right close to my desk (I mean table), which seemed slightly aggressive in itself, though I was probably being paranoid. I think they had just had been into the nail bar next door, because one of them had the leaflet, and they were looking at it while they talked. Their main topic was another woman they all knew. “Hannah was quiet for Hannah.” “She’s usually... such a character.” (Small laugh.) “Her heart’s in the right place.” “How is her mother?” “Not long left.” “N’ah. Shame. Particularly as she’s lost just her father as well.” “God, pedicures are expensive.” How extraordinary, I thought, that they could be so callous, move so effortlessly from the death of a friend’s two parents to the price of a gel nail. And not just that. On the surface, they had appeared to be complimentary about poor Hannah - ‘“such a character”, “her heart’s in the right place” - and yet both comments were actually barbed and not really very kind at all. And if I was Hannah, deranged by grief, and I knew that these smug women with their leisurely lives and their pedicure leaflets were talking about me in that way, well, I wouldn’t like to predict the consequences. I left that cafe, and I went somewhere else the next day - Deli Boutique in Clapham, a new French-run establishment that serves crepes to school children after 3.30pm. It was quiet enough in the morning, though a woman next to me did keep talking about how “disgusting” it was that her daughter’s teacher didn’t return her emails. (The teeth-clenched force behind that most visceral of adjectives suggested a more generalised anger that could do with specialist help). Lunchtime, though, I became aware of latent violence in many of the throwaway remarks wafting over the aroma of hot cheese and ham croissant. “I’m going to have to say something. I can’t live like this.” And “It’s the groaning I can’t bear.” And: “If this job doesn’t come up trumps I’m going to slit my wrists.” Two men in jeans were standing at the counter, waiting for a takeaway chicken pie. “Who’s left of your team now Andy’s ...gone?” one of them said casually to the other. “Just me and Layla,” the second man said. The first man's mouth dropped open. “You’re all that’s left?” Left where? I mean, probably they were just talking about work, redundancies, but I didn’t like the rigid fix of the second man’s jaw. Who was Layla? Did she mind being on her own with him? What had happened to all the others? I walked home a little after that - a nice walk across the common. A man with a beard in a heavy camouflage jacket was talking loudly just ahead of me his mobile phone. “Are you still going on about the kitchen?” he was saying. He had a forthright posh accent. “Are you still complaining? What do you want now? I trust them OK?” He listened for a bit and then started really shouting. “I cannot listen to this any more. I have a troop to organise to Afghanistan. Do you really think I care about the kitchen? Just shut up. OK. SHUT UP. If you don’t shut up I’m going to come home and blow your head off. Do you hear me? Blow your head off.” Well. I scurried across the grass pretty quickly after that. I actually think he was following me because he left the path too, and I don’t know why he would have done that otherwise. I was out of breath when I reached the safety of the main road. A friend was waiting with her dog to cross at the lights. I told her what I had just overheard. I didn’t think he was a real soldier, I said. He was clearly mad. Dangerous. She looked at me and then she looked back over the common. The sun had come out, dappling through the leaves. A few ducks idly floated on the pond. “How’s the book?” she said.

August: The Mulholland Month Of Death

Mulholland Newsletter August 9th

Yes, it’s a melodramatic beginning… but what can you do when the two books we publish this month are called THE FROZEN DEAD and THIS IS HOW YOU DIE? Move over Scandinavia… the French are coming. As proved by the success of The Returned and Pierre Lemaitre’s Alex, French crime is officially the next big thing. The perfect chilling summer read, THE FROZEN DEAD has already been picked as Irish Tatler’s book of the month. And the blogger over at CrimeFictionLover agrees with us: ‘This is a perfect holiday read: its dark wintery landscapes will chill and thrill you on hot summer days’ Meanwhile, THIS IS HOW YOU DIE takes the concept of a Machine of Death that is always right in its predictions (but not always how you expect) and delivers a host of fun, startling, sad and uplifting takes on the subject. The AV Club said ‘This Is How You Die is a celebration of creativity, exploring how impressively far one idea can be stretched without breaking’ in its A-grade review while Kirkus called it ‘funny, frightening, clever’. The editors have created a series of brilliant videos to promote – we dare you to watch and decide whether you want to go by way of ‘Old Age’, ‘Parachute’, ‘Hot Girl’, ‘Time Travel’, or ‘Bear’. And reviews for recently published books keep coming in: the Guardian called LEXICON ‘a spellbinding, intelligent read’; the Sunday Telegraph says UNDER YOUR SKIN is ‘delectably twisted’ and ‘a joy to read’; and Jake Kerridge, in a guest post for Shots, says A KILLING OF ANGELS ‘combines excellent storytelling with sharp psychological depth’. Have happy summers… and remember to pack some crime with your sun cream.

Chapter One

RIVER OF SMOKE, by Amitav Ghosh

Read the first chapter of Amitav Ghosh's RIVER OF SMOKE, the second book of his Ibis trilogy.

Chapter One

THE YELLOW BIRDS by Kevin Powers

Read the first chapter of Kevin Powers' THE YELLOW BIRDS - described by the Guardian as 'a must-read book'.

Chapter One

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, by John le Carré

Read the first chapter of John le Carré's acclaimed TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, now a major film.

by Sabine Durrant

The Secret Confessions of a Novelist

Twix fingers, cats and theft - author of UNDER YOUR SKIN Sabine Durrant shares her secret confessions . . .