Related to: 'Pamela Young'

Coronet

Vaster Than Sky, Greater Than Space

Mooji
Authors:
Mooji

In ever-growing gatherings worldwide, the revered teacher Mooji has opened the eyes of thousands through his rare ability to shine light on the ineffable with uncommon clarity, humour and warmth. Now, in Vaster Than Sky, Greater Than Space, Mooji invites and inspires readers everywhere to discover the true essence from which we all arise. Throughout the book he addresses various questions that come up for seekers, such as: How do I find peace, joy, love and happiness?Is it really possible for an ordinary person with a job and family to attain enlightenment?Are intimate relationships a help or a hindrance to awakening? I don't believe in God, and I don't consider myself a devotional type of person, but the word Truth resonates with me - are your teachings relevant to me?You use the phrase 'timeless presence'. What does it mean? How can anything be timeless? How does one transcend personal conditioning and suppressed emotions, and so come to lasting freedom?If we are essentially free, why does it seem so difficult and distant, so remote or rare to realise the Truth? Through our own earnest search for truth, Mooji helps us arrive at the answers, not by offering concepts but by leading us back to our hidden yet inherent knowing.

Hodder & Stoughton

Home

Jo Swinney
Authors:
Jo Swinney

Where is Home?This question troubles many of us. We may live far from where we grew up, away from those we love or in a culture not our own. But we all need somewhere to belong, to find a sense of home in this world.Jo Swinney was born in the UK, but grew up in Portugal and France. She went to an English boarding school, did a gap year in southern Africa and in her twenties studied theology in Canada, where she met her American husband. Now back in the UK, she's had more reason than most to wonder what 'home' really means.Is home where you come from - where you live now - where the people you love are - or what?Interweaving a frank and poignant retelling of her own story with theological and psychological insights, Jo's original and authentic exploration of home in all its many and varied forms is a heartfelt call to find our home in the things that are truly of most value.

Hodder & Stoughton

Not in God's Name

Jonathan Sacks
Authors:
Jonathan Sacks
Hodder & Stoughton

Judas

Peter Stanford
Authors:
Peter Stanford
Coronet

Alan Stoob: Nazi Hunter

Saul Wordsworth
Authors:
Saul Wordsworth
Sceptre

Scarp

Nick Papadimitriou
Authors:
Nick Papadimitriou
John Murray

Let Not the Waves of the Sea

Simon Stephenson
Authors:
Simon Stephenson

LET NOT THE WAVES OF THE SEA is Simon Stephenson's account of his journey following the loss of his brother in the Indian Ocean tsunami. If it is a story of grief, it is also a story of hope and of the unexpected places where healing can be found. Simon's journey takes him from Edinburgh in the immediate aftermath of the disaster, to Downing Street in London, to Thailand and the island where his brother died, to the scene of an ancient tsunami on the north-west coast of the United States, and to the town where he and his brother's favourite childhood film was made. Along the way there is heartbreak, dengue fever, Greek mythology, and hard physical labour in the tropical heat, but there is also memory, redemption and humour as well.

Coronet

Hope Street

Pamela Young
Authors:
Pamela Young

This is the story of a family which has always lived in the heart of one of the traditional working class communities of the North. Originally immigrants from Ireland in the mid-nineteenth century, their saga, their triumphs and tragedies unfolded in the cobbled streets, working men's cottages and terraced houses of Horwich, near Manchester. They worked in the cotton mills and on the railways. Like most families at the time, they were good socialists and trade unionists. They also attended the local Spiritualist church. Spiritualism was free-thinking, modern and progressive too and went hand in hand with socialism. The family living on Hope Street North had problems every family has - and worse. Marriages broke up and they had more than their fair share of loss and heartbreak. Within the working class in those days there were many - now forgotten - class distinctions which caused painful rifts between the family. There was a violent bully too and an eviction which left a mother and her children wandering the streets penniless and homeless. A young girl was run over and killed by a horse and cart and another died of diptheria. An unmarried woman bound her abdomen tightly to disguise her pregnancy, and as a result her child was born with deformed legs. As a young woman, that child went on to elope with her lover and they both committed suicide. She died as she was born: in shame. The book that would become Hope Street started when Pamela Young felt compelled to write about her mother's childhood, of seeing things - spirits, angels - that other people couldn't see. Vivid memories of their family life came flooding back: coal dusk glistening on her father's scalp as he came home from work, the old army coats used as bedding and the dresser with doors missing because they'd been chopped up as firewood when times were hard. And swirling in and around these very vivid, often earthy memories of life in Hope Street were memories of the extraordinary spiritual phenomena that took place there. On one occasion a silver ball sped around the room. On another her father, asking for proof, was picked up by a spirit guide and lifted up into the air as light as a feather. Pamela would once see her mother engulfed in a cloud of ectoplasm and twice her mother gradually, and starting from her head down, disappeared before her eyes. But it was after her own marriage had broken up and her mother had died, when Pamela was in the depths of despair, that she found her own spiritual gift. Guided by the spirit of her mother, she began to fully understand the great project her mother had initiated.

Chapter One: The Old Long Since

RULES OF CIVILITY, by Amor Towles

Read the first chapter of Amor Towles' RULES OF CIVILITY.

Chapter One: Murdering Mrs Durance

THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS, by Thomas Keneally

Read the first chapter of Sceptre Booker prize-winning author Thomas Keneally's newest novel, THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS.

Chapter One

THE YELLOW BIRDS by Kevin Powers

Read the first chapter of Kevin Powers' THE YELLOW BIRDS - described by the Guardian as 'a must-read book'.

Chapter One: Suicide Corner

SCARP by Nick Papadimitriou

Read the first chapter of Nick Papadimitriou's SCARP.

Chapter One: A Morning in Vermillion

SHADES OF GREY, by Jasper Fforde

Read the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's brilliant SHADES OF GREY.

Reading Group Guide

HANDLE WITH CARE by Jodi Picoult

Reading group guide to use alongside Jodi Picoult's HANDLE WITH CARE.

Chapter One

UNEXPECTED LESSONS IN LOVE, by Bernardine Bishop

Read the first chapter of Bernardine Bishop's new book, UNEXPECTED LESSONS IN LOVE, published by John Murray in January 2013.

Members of the Hodder team on David Mitchell's brilliant novel

The Week of a Thousand Autumns

Over the course of a week, various members of the Hodder team write about their experience with David Mitchell's THE THOUSAND AUTUMNS OF JACOB DE ZOET.

Chapter One

THE PEOPLE'S TRAIN, by Thomas Keneally

Read the first chapter of Thomas Keneally's THE PEOPLE'S TRAIN.

Chapter One

COME SUNDAY, by Isla Morley

Read the first chapter of Isla Morley's COME SUNDAY.

An excerpt from the Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

CLOUD ATLAS, by David Mitchell

Read an excerpt of David Mitchell's international bestseller, CLOUD ATLAS, now also releasing as a film.