Related to: 'Jo Tinsley'

Chambers

The Odysseum

David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley
Authors:
David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley

THE ODDYSIUM explores extraordinary journeys, pilgrimages, expeditions and meanders of the mind that helped us to figure out our place in the world. We will learn about epic trips to the bottom of the ocean, to outer space and to the deepest cave on earth ("like climbing an inverted Mount Everest") as well as micro-journeys, such as Xavier de Maistre's six-week odyssey around his bedroom and the tale of a Nazi who attempted to walk around the world without setting foot outside of his prison. Brought to you by the bestselling authors of THE ODDITORIUM and THE MYSTERIUM, this book is a call to arms to step off the beaten path and embark on your own eccentric, remarkable odyssey.

Two Roads

The Wisdom of Sally Red Shoes

Ruth Hogan
Authors:
Ruth Hogan

Loved Ruth Hogan's The Keeper of Lost Things? Keep on reading...'Warm and wise' Guardian 'A book to really love ... makes reading a joy' Stylist 'Will soften even the hardest of hearts' Red 'Subtle and poignant' Good Housekeeping 'Plenty of spirit and heart' Daily Mail 'An adorable heartfelt story' Prima 'Filled with hope and the power of friendship' Evening Standard 'A whimsical, wistful affair' Sunday Express 'A wrenching story of recovery' MetroMasha's life has stopped. Once a spirited, independent woman with a rebellious streak, her life has been forever changed by a tragic event twelve years ago. Unable to let go of her grief, she finds solace in the silent company of the souls of her local Victorian cemetery and at the town's lido, where she seeks refuge underwater - safe from the noise and the pain.But a chance encounter with two extraordinary women - the fabulous and wise Kitty Muriel, a convent girl-turned-magician's wife-turned-seventy-something-roller-disco-fanatic, and the mysterious Sally Red Shoes, a bag lady with a prodigious voice - opens up a new world of possibilities, and the chance to start living again. But just as Masha dares to imagine the future, the past comes roaring back ...Like her bestselling debut, The Keeper of Lost Things, Ruth Hogan's second novel introduces a cast of wonderful characters, both ordinary and charmingly eccentric, who guide us through a moving exploration of the simple human connections that make life worth living.Praise for The Keeper of Lost Things, a Richard & Judy Book Club pick 2017Winner of the Richard & Judy Readers' Award 2017'A gem' Huffington Post'Exquisite' The Lady'Delightful' Helen Simonson, author of Major Pettigrew's Last Stand

Yellow Kite

Swim Wild

Jack Hudson, Calum Hudson, Robbie Hudson
Authors:
Jack Hudson, Calum Hudson, Robbie Hudson
Chambers

The Mysterium

Jo Tinsley, David Bramwell
Authors:
Jo Tinsley, David Bramwell
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Where the Wild Winds Are

Nick Hunt
Authors:
Nick Hunt

SHORTLISTED FOR THE STANFORD DOLMAN TRAVEL BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARDA Financial Times Book of the YearA Spectator Book of the YearA Daily Telegraph Book of the Year'Travel writing in excelsis' -Jan Morris, author of Venice'A thrilling and gorgeous tale, packed with meteorological wonder' -Amy Liptrot, author of The OutrunNick Hunt sets off on an unlikely quest: to follow four of Europe's winds across the continent...His wind-walks begin on Cross Fell, the highest point of the Pennines, as he chases the roaring Helm - the only named wind in Britain. In southern Europe he follows the Bora - a bitter northerly that blows from Trieste through Slovenia and down the Croatian coast. His hunt for the 'snow-eating' Foehn becomes a meandering journey of exhilaration and despair through the Alpine valleys of Switzerland, and his final walk traces an ancient pilgrims' path in the south of France on the trail of the Mistral - the 'wind of madness' which animated and tormented Vincent Van Gogh.These are journeys into wild wind, but also into wild landscapes and the people who inhabit them - a cast of meteorologists, storm chasers, mountain men, eccentric wind enthusiasts, sailors and shepherds. Soon Nick finds himself borne along by the very forces he is pursuing, through rain, blizzards, howling gales, and back through time itself. For, where the wild winds are, there are also myths and legends, history and hearsay, science and superstition - and occasionally remote mountain cabins packed with pickles, cured meats and homemade alcohol.Where the Wild Winds Are is a beautiful, unconventional travelogue that makes the invisible visible.

John Murray

Wonderland

Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
Authors:
Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss

'Vibrant, fascinating, poetic - a year in living things: all the things we love, all the things we wish we could, all the little things we step over and never know - the best of British wildlife from two superb naturalists and writers' CHRIS PACKHAMA life-affirming nature diary - with something amazing to see and experience on every day of the year -from award-winning authors and Springwatch experts Brett Westwood and Stephen Moss.From blackbirds, beavers and beetles to tawny owls, natterjack toads and lemon slugs. Every day of the year, winter or summer, in every corner of the British Isles, there's plenty to see if you know where - and how - to look. From encounters with the curious black redstart, which winters on our rocky coasts, to the tiny green snowdrop shoots that are the first sign that spring might be round the corner. And from the blossom-time and dawn choruses of April and May into the abundant noisiness of summer, where days start with hawker dragonflies and drowsy bumblebees and end with glow-worms and ghost moths; to autumn when in the early morning mist of London's Richmond Park male red deer lock horns in competition for a mate.Nature is always full of surprises - whether it's the strange behaviour of clothes moths or the gruesome larder of the strike. Distilling two lifetimes' knowledge, expert insight and enthusiasm, award-winning authors and passionate naturalists Brett Westwood and Stephen Moss take us through the year, day by day, sharing the unexpected delights that we can experience in our skies, beaches, rivers, fields, forests and back gardens. There are all kinds of adventures waiting on your doorstep, any day of the year, all you need is Wonderland. (P)2017 John Murray Press

Chambers

The Odditorium

David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley
Authors:
David Bramwell, Jo Tinsley
Two Roads

The Arab of the Future 2

Riad Sattouf
Authors:
Riad Sattouf

VOLUME 2 IN THE UNFORGETTABLE STORY OF AN EXTRAORDINARY CHILDHOODA GUARDIAN BOOK OF THE YEAR | AN OBSERVER GRAPHIC BOOK OF THE YEARA NEW YORK TIMES CRITICS' TOP BOOKS OF 2016 'EXUBERANTLY HERETICAL''I tore through it... The most enjoyable graphic novel I've read in a while' Zadie Smith'I joyously recommend this book to you' Mark Haddon'Riad Sattouf is one of the great creators of our time' Alain De Botton'Beautifully-written and drawn, witty, sad, fascinating... Brilliant' Simon Sebag MontefioreThe first volume of Riad Sattouf's The Arab of the Future introduced young Riad as his family shuttled back and forth between France and the Middle East. Here is the continuation of his heart-rending, darkly comic story. Now settled in his father's village of Ter Maaleh near Homs, Riad finally begins school, where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of the dictator Hafez Al-Assad. Told simply yet with devastating effect, Riad's story takes in the sweep of Middle Eastern life of the 1980s, but it is steered by acutely observed small moments: the daily sadism of his schoolteachers, the cruelty and vulnerability of his fellow students, and the obsequiousness of his father in the company of those close to the regime. And as the family strains to fit in, one chilling, barbaric act drives the Sattoufs to take the most dramatic of steps. Immediate and gripping, The Arab of the Future 2 once again reveals the inner workings of a tormented country and a tormented family, delivered through Riad Sattouf 's dazzlingly original graphic style.Translated by Sam Taylor.***THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE - THE INTERNATIONAL SENSATION*** #1 BESTSELLER IN FRANCE | GUARDIAN 'BEST GRAPHIC BOOKS OF 2015' PICK | NYTIMES EDITOR'S CHOICE | SELECTED AS ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY LATIMES, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, AMAZON.COM, PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, NPR | WINNER OF THE FAUVE D'OR PRIZE FOR BEST ALBUM OF THE YEAR AT THE ANGOULÊME INTERNATIONAL COMICS FESTIVAL | WINNER OF THE LATIMES BOOK PRIZE FOR GRAPHIC NOVELS | NOMINATED FOR 'BEST REALITY-BASED WORK' AT THE EISNER AWARDS

Saltyard Books

Tweet of the Day

Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
Authors:
Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
Sceptre

The Teleportation Accident

Ned Beauman
Authors:
Ned Beauman
Coronet

Skimming Stones

Rob Cowen, Leo Critchley
Authors:
Rob Cowen, Leo Critchley
Hodder Paperbacks

Quarterdeck

Julian Stockwin
Authors:
Julian Stockwin

'In Stockwin's hands the sea story will continue to entrance readers across the world' - GuardianThomas Kydd was promoted to acting lieutenant at the bloody Battle of Camperdown in October 1797. Now, he must sit an examination to confirm his rank - or face an inglorious return before the mast.But this is only the first of many obstacles for a man who was pressed into the King's Service and discovered a calling for the sea. Kydd is from humble origins, yet he attains the lofty heights of the quarterdeck as an officer in His Majesty's Navy. If he is to avoid spending the rest of his career as a tarpaulin officer, he must also become a gentleman.Kydd and his enigmatic friend Nicholas Renzi set sail in HMS Tenacious for the North American station. Aboard the old 64-gun ship, Kydd comes to doubt he will ever match up to the high-born gentlemen officers.********************What readers are saying about QUARTERDECK'Superb writing, superb characterisation' - 5 stars'Excellent reading' - 5 stars'Without question the best series I have read in years' - 5 stars'This book is of the highest standard' - 5 stars'A splendid story' - 5 stars

Jo Keeling

Jo is the editor and publisher of Ernest Journal, an awardwinning digital and printed magazine for the curious and adventurous. It is a guide for those who appreciate true craftsmanship, slow adventure and eccentric history. She worked on the launch team for Countryfile magazine, launched and edited Pretty Nostalgic magazine and co-authored Wild Guide: Devon, Cornwall and South West. She writes regularly for Countryfile, The Simple Things,The Guardian, Independent and greentraveller.co.uk. She has hosted Bristol's Biggest Indoor Picnic and collaborated on events at Wilderness Festival, Port Eliot and Eroica Britannia.

Chapter I

THE ROUNDABOUT MAN, by Clare Morrall

Read the first chapter of Clare Morrall's THE ROUNDABOUT MAN.

An excerpt from the Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

CLOUD ATLAS, by David Mitchell

Read an excerpt of David Mitchell's international bestseller, CLOUD ATLAS, now also releasing as a film.

Deon Meyer's editor Nick Sayers puts his Afrikaans to the test

Translating Deon Meyer

Are you ready for the weekend? I hope so. I had a lekker time last week watching the World Cup final. My neighbours had a braai in the garden first - Harry burned the flippen sausages, but ag, never mind, it was still lekker. This weekend. I’m at the Harrogate Crime Writing Festival, always a real jol, crime writers are such a moerse social bunch. One thing’s for sure: I’ll be poegaai by the time it’s finished! OK, OK, I admit it… I’ve been reading Deon Meyer again, my favourite South African writer, who peppers his brilliant crime fiction with expressions from his native Afrikaans. (Not quite as many as I used in that first paragraph, don’t worry!) Or I should say his wonderful translator, K.L. Seegers, does the peppering, because Deon writes it all in his first language. This often comes as a surprise to people who have heard him speak so eloquently - in English - at literary festivals like Harrogate and book signings in the UK and America, but Deon says he wouldn’t quite be confident enough to write in a foreign language. And perhaps that sense that we are reading a story with rhythms and expressions that are not originally English is one of the factors that make his work so compelling and enjoyable, such a marvellous window into a different world. One of the things you quickly learn from Deon’s stories, of course, is that Afrikaans is just one of many languages spoken in the ‘Rainbow Nation’ by people with a host of different ethnic and cultural backgrounds - and many of them are represented in the police force in which Deon’s weather-beaten detective, Benny Griessel, serves his country. It is not so long ago that the police, as part of the apparatus of the state, could be described as fighting a war against the ANC, who now govern the country. So for long-serving policemen like Benny, the changes at work must have been tumultuous. However, it’s not just the management structure which has set Benny’s head spinning, as regular readers know. Beset by personal problems, he has allowed alcohol to become his biggest enemy. Still, recent novels have seen him slowly getting the upper hand in his battle with the bottle, becoming a mentor to a new generation of detectives from some of those varied backgrounds, and regaining not just confidence, but also his status as a brilliant investigator. Not to mention the beginnings of a new relationship with the beautiful and talented singer Alexa Bernard - a woman fighting demons of her own, admittedly, but someone who can bring some love back to Benny’s life. (Sometimes more often in one night than he can manage!) So, everything’s moerse - cool. Which brings me back to the question of Afrikaans. Translated fiction has obviously undergone quite a boom in our market in recent years, but I must admit I hadn’t thought much about the technicalities of it until asked to share a panel with Deon and some other writers and critics in Bristol a while ago. Lots of interesting questions were raised, and the one that stays with me is how much should we be trying to explain a foreign country to an English reader, and how much should we just be saying this is an exact translation of a foreign text, use it as a sort of full-immersion experience of another world? Here’s an example. In one of Deon’s novels - I think it’s Trackers - a woman is described as the type who would buy her lunch at Woolies. It turns out that Woolworths in South Africa is a very different proposition from the now-defunct chain of shops in the UK. As I understand it, the brand equates more to Waitrose than its cheap-and-cheerful UK namesake. Do you start changing the text in some explanatory way so that it’s different from what Afrikaans readers have enjoyed, or do you start adding footnotes, or do you just let the reader work it out? So far, we’ve just put a glossary at the back of the recent books - but we would be very happy to receive any thoughts from our readers. Someone has already suggested that we should make it clearer at the front of the book that the glossary is at the end, and that is a simple thing I regret not having done in the first place, so do be in touch with any more ideas. Personally, I love the scattering of Afrikaans words, the sense that I am plunging into a different culture and climate and way of life, but still, the main thing is, these are amongst the finest crime novels being written anywhere in the world. The plots, the characters, the emotions, these things are universal in their appeal. I do urge you to go out and read them. Oh, and did I say that everything is cool for Benny now? I guess that was true until the moment the Cobra killer came on the scene… Deon’s newest novel is right up there with his very best.

Chapter One

COME SUNDAY, by Isla Morley

Read the first chapter of Isla Morley's COME SUNDAY.

Chapter One: A Morning in Vermillion

SHADES OF GREY, by Jasper Fforde

Read the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's brilliant SHADES OF GREY.

01 Aug
Cornwall

Mark Ellen interviewing Alan Johnson at Port Eliot

6pm

Mark Ellen interviewing Alan Johnson at Port Eliot

01 Aug
Cornwall

Mark Ellen interviewing Alan Johnson at Port Eliot

6pm

Mark Ellen interviewing Alan Johnson at Port Eliot