Related to: 'Denis Avey'

Hodder & Stoughton

The Orphanage of Gods

Helena Coggan
Authors:
Helena Coggan

'Vivid and intense. Helena Coggan had me on the edge of my seat to the final page of this gripping new YA fantasy' - Amanda Bouchet, USA Today bestselling author of The Kingmaker Chronicles'This book. This BOOK! I loved it. Seriously. An all-encompassing total love. It's my favourite book that I've read in a long time!' - 5-STAR reader reviewTwenty years ago, the humans came for their gods. In the bloody revolution, gods were all but wiped out. Ever since, the children they left behind have been imprisoned in an orphanage, watched day and night by the ruthless Guard. Any who show signs of divine power vanish from their beds in the night, all knowledge of their existence denied.No one has ever escaped the orphanage.Until now.Seventeen-year-old Hero is finally free - but at a terrible price. Her sister has been captured by the Guard and is being held in a prison in the northern sea. Hero desperately wants to get her back, and to escape the murderous Guardsmen hunting her down. But not all the gods are dead, and the ones waiting for Hero in the north have their own plans for her - ones that will change the world forever . . .As she advances further and further into the unknown, Hero will need to decide: how far is she willing to go to do what needs to be done? ************Praise for Helena Coggan's 'The Catalyst''This year's Divergent' - Sun 'A phenomenal achievement . . . assured, frightening, action-packed' - Observer'A pulsing, labyrinthine, emotionally visceral plot' - Metro

Hodder & Stoughton

My Grandfather Would Have Shot Me

Jennifer Teege, Nikola Sellmair
Authors:
Jennifer Teege, Nikola Sellmair

'A powerful account of Teege's struggle for resolution and redemption.' IndependentAn international bestseller, this is the extraordinary and moving memoir of a woman who learns that her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the brutal Nazi commandant depicted in Schindler's List.When Jennifer Teege, a German-Nigerian woman, happened to pluck a library book from the shelf, she had no idea that her life would be irrevocably altered. Recognising photos of her mother and grandmother in the book, she discovers a horrifying fact: Her grandfather was Amon Goeth, the vicious Nazi commandant chillingly depicted by Ralph Fiennes in Schindler's List - a man known and reviled the world over.Although raised in an orphanage and eventually adopted, Teege had some contact with her biological mother and grandmother as a child. Yet neither revealed that Teege's grandfather was the Nazi "butcher of Plaszów," executed for crimes against humanity in 1946. The more Teege reads about Amon Goeth, the more certain she becomes: If her grandfather had met her-a black woman-he would have killed her.Teege's discovery sends her, at age 38, into a severe depression-and on a quest to unearth and fully comprehend her family's haunted history. Her research takes her to Krakow - to the sites of the Jewish ghetto her grandfather 'cleared' in 1943 and the Plaszów concentration camp he then commanded - and back to Israel, where she herself once attended college, learned fluent Hebrew, and formed lasting friendships. Teege struggles to reconnect with her estranged mother Monika, and to accept that her beloved grandmother once lived in luxury as Amon Goeth's mistress at Plaszów.Teege's story is co-written by award-winning journalist Nikola Sellmair, who also contributes a second, interwoven narrative that draws on original interviews with Teege's family and friends and adds historical context. Ultimately, Teege's resolute search for the truth leads her, step by step, to the possibility of her own liberation.

John Murray

No Better Friend

Robert Weintraub
Authors:
Robert Weintraub
Hodder & Stoughton

Lucky Johnny

Johnny Sherwood
Authors:
Johnny Sherwood

In 1938 Johnny Sherwood was a young professional footballer on the brink of an England career, touring the world with the all-star British team the Islington Corinthians. By 1942 he was a soldier surrendering to the Japanese at the siege of Singapore. Taken prisoner he was sent to a POW camp deep in the heart of the Thai jungle, where he was starved, beaten, and forced to build the notorious 'railway of death' on the River Kwai. Johnny kept his and his men's spirits up with tales of his footballing past, even organising matches until he and the other prisoners became too weak to play. One day, he even encountered a brutal Japanese guard, and was shocked to recognise him as a Japanese footballer Johnny had played against. Many years after Johnny's death, his grandson Michael discovered an old manuscript hidden in the attic of his mother's house. It was Johnny's own account of his wartime experiences - the story too horrific to reveal in full to his loved ones. In the tradition of bestselling memoirs like The Railway Man, Lucky Johnny is an inspirational tale of survival against the odds.

Two Roads

Love and Treasure

Ayelet Waldman
Authors:
Ayelet Waldman

'AN AMBITIOUS, PERCEPTIVE NOVEL' GUARDIAN'A WONDERFULLY IMAGINATIVE WRITER' WASHINGTON POSTA fugitive train loaded with the plunder of a doomed people. A dazzling jewelled pendant in the form of a stylized peacock. And three men - an American infantry captain in World War II, an Israeli-born dealer in art stolen by the Nazis, and a pioneering psychiatrist in fin-de-siecle Budapest - who find their carefully-wrought lives turned upside-down by three fierce women, each locked in a struggle against her own history and the history of our times. And at the centre of Love and Treasure, nested like a photograph hidden in a locket, a mystery: where does the worth of a people and its treasures truly lie? What is the value of a gift, when giver and recipient have been lost - of a love offering when the beloved is no more?In an intricately constructed narrative that is by turns funny and tragic, thrilling and harrowing, with all the expertise and narrative drive that readers have come to expect from her work, Waldman traces the unlikely journey, from 1914 Budapest to post-war Salzburg to present-day New York, of the peacock pendant whose significance changes - token of friendship, love-offering, unlucky talisman - with the changes of fortune undergone by her characters as they find themselves caught up in the ebb and flow of modern European history.Spanning continents and a hundred years of turbulent history, encompassing war and revolution, the history of art, feminism and psychoanalysis, depicting the range of human feeling from the darkness of a shattered Europe to the ordinary heartbreaks of a contemporary New York woman, Love and Treasure marks the full maturity of a remarkable writer.

Hodder & Stoughton

After Auschwitz

Eva Schloss
Authors:
Eva Schloss
Hodder & Stoughton

Survivor: Auschwitz, the Death March and my fight for freedom

Sam Pivnik
Authors:
Sam Pivnik

Sam Pivnik is the ultimate survivor from a world that no longer exists. On fourteen occasions he should have been killed, but luck, his physical strength and his determination not to die all played a part in Sam Pivnik living to tell his extraordinary life story.In 1939, on his thirteenth birthday, his life changed forever when the Nazis invaded Poland. He survived the two ghettoes set up in his home town of Bedzin and six months on Auschwitz's notorious Rampkommando where prisoners were either taken away for entry to the camp or gassing. After this harrowing experience he was sent to work at the brutal Furstengrube mining camp. He could have died on the 'Death March' that took him west as the Third Reich collapsed and he was one of only a handful of people who swam to safety when the Royal Air Force sank the prison ship Cap Arcona, in 1945, mistakenly believing it to be carrying fleeing members of the SS.He eventually made his way to London where he found people too preoccupied with their own wartime experiences on the Home Front to be interested in what had happened to him.Now in his eighties, Sam Pivnik tells for the first time the story of his life, a true tale of survival against the most extraordinary odds.

Coronet

Rogue Male

Roger Field And Geoffrey Gordo, N Creed
Authors:
Roger Field And Geoffrey Gordo, N Creed

This is the untold story of one of the most lethal and successful soldiers of the Second World War - a highly decorated hero as well as a self-confessed rogue. In the tank war in the desert of North Africa, Major Geoff, as he came to be known, quickly showed himself a soldier of superb athleticism, unwavering will to win and almost superhuman instincts when it came to survival and outwitting the enemy. Almost incredibly he won the Military Cross on his very first day in action. He fought alongside the SAS in its early days and was with them while they were forging the ruthless fighting techniques that have made them feared throughout the world. He played a decisive role in the Greek resistance to German occupation. While in Greece he also became involved in some of the dirtiest hand to hand fighting of the war. To the men with whom he fought shoulder to shoulder he was 'Saint Geoff', to his enemies he was the devil incarnate, a man who would stop at absolutely nothing, and to his critics among the partisans he a was a womanizer, more interested in enjoying himself than killing the enemy.This is an honest account of winning the war not by fair play but by being more ruthless than your enemy. But maybe what is even more extraordinary than his soldiering - its predatory ruthlessness and amorality - is the frank account of sexual adventuring that went with it. This is how the dogs of war really behave when they are let off the leash. 'Thrilling (and even classic)... parachuted as a saboteur into Greece, where he stayed for over a year, doing heroic mischief against the Nazis, and not exactly improving the morals of the local Greek women. There's no doubting that this is the record of a hero - albeit one in the Flashman mode.' A.N. Wilson - Reader's Digest 'Major Geoff is a brave, blithe adventurer in ruthless, resourceful action, as opportunistic and vigorous in the theatre of war as in the bedroom' Times'Former army officer Roger Field pieces together Major Geoff's unpublished journals and letters in this uncut version of World War II. Most riveting of all is the Major's account of the destruction of the Asopos Viaduct in occupied Greece - this is Boys' Own stuff at its best.'Daily Mail'War heroes come in all shapes and sizes, but I've rarely come across any as charismatic as Geoffrey Gordon-Creed... A maverick and prodigious womaniser, it's no surprise to learn he was a friend of Ian Fleming and was reputedly one of the models for James Bond.' Mail on Sunday

Hodder Paperbacks

The Lost Wife

Alyson Richman
Authors:
Alyson Richman

There on her forearm, next to a small brown birthmark, were six tattooed numbers.'Do you remember me now?' he asked, trembling. She looked at him again, as if giving weight and bone to a ghost.'Lenka, it's me,' he said. 'Josef. Your husband.'During the last moments of calm in prewar Prague, Lenka, a young art student, falls in love with Josef. They marry - but soon, like so many others, they are torn apart by the currents of war.In America Josef becomes a successful obstetrician and raises a family, though he never forgets the wife he thinks died in the camps. But in the Nazi ghetto of Terezín - and later in Auschwitz - Lenka has survived, relying on her skills as an artist and the memories of a husband she believes she will never see again. Now, decades later, an unexpected encounter in New York brings Lenka and Josef back together.From the comfort of life in Prague before the occupation to the horrors of Nazi Europe, The Lost Wife explores the endurance of first love, the resilience of the human spirit and our capacity to remember.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Man Who Broke into Auschwitz

Denis Avey, Rob Broomby
Authors:
Denis Avey, Rob Broomby

THE INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLERTHE MAN WHO BROKE INTO AUSCHWITZ is the extraordinary true story of a British soldier who marched willingly into Buna-Monowitz, the concentration camp known as Auschwitz III.In the summer of 1944, Denis Avey was being held in a POW labour camp, E715, near Auschwitz III. He had heard of the brutality meted out to the prisoners there and he was determined to witness what he could. He hatched a plan to swap places with a Jewish inmate and smuggled himself into his sector of the camp. He spent the night there on two occasions and experienced at first-hand the cruelty of a place where slave workers, had been sentenced to death through labour. Astonishingly, he survived to witness the aftermath of the Death March where thousands of prisoners were murdered by the Nazis as the Soviet Army advanced. After his own long trek right across central Europe he was repatriated to Britain. For decades he couldn't bring himself to revisit the past, but now Denis Avey feels able to tell the full story - a tale as gripping as it is moving - which offers us a unique insight into the mind of an ordinary man whose moral and physical courage are almost beyond belief.

John Murray

Sarah's Key

Tatiana De Rosnay
Authors:
Tatiana De Rosnay

Released in 2010 as a major motion picture starring Kristin Scott Thomas, Sarah's Key is perfect for fans of The Tattooist of Auschwitz and All the Light We Cannot See. 'A remarkable novel. Like Sophie's Choice, it's a book that impresses itself upon one's heart and soul forever' Naomi Ragen, author of The Saturday WifeParis, July 1942. Sarah, a ten year-old Jewish girl, is arrested by the French police in the middle of the night, along with her mother and father. Desperate to protect her younger brother, she locks him in a cupboard and promises to come back for him as soon as she can. Paris, May 2002. Julia Jarmond, an American journalist, is asked to write about the 60th anniversary of the Vel' d'Hiv' roundup - the infamous day in 1942 when French police rounded up thousands of Jewish men, women and children, in order to send them to concentration camps. Sarah's Key is the poignant story of two families, forever linked and haunted by one of the darkest days in France's past. In this emotionally intense, page-turning novel, Tatiana de Rosnay reveals the guilt brought on by long-buried secrets and the damage that the truth can inflict when they finally come unravelled.

John Murray

POW

Adrian Gilbert
Authors:
Adrian Gilbert

Just under 300,000 Allied servicemen from Britain, the Commonwealth and the United States were captured in Europe and North Africa between 1939 and 1945. Using a wealth of new sources, POW describes their experiences. Prisoners' day-to-day lives are vividly rendered: the workings of the prison-camp system; the ways in which prisoners maintained contact with the outside world through letters, parcels and the benign agency of the Red Cross; artistic and intellectual endeavours; as well as unacknowledged aspects of camp life such as the development of sexual relations - both heterosexual and homosexual. Everyday life is offset by high drama, as POW tells of the secret organisations who smuggled escape aids to the prisoners. In return they furnished their home nations with intelligence from occupied Europe. Although few men were actively engaged in escape attempts, many provided tacit support or were engaged in sabotage and other resistance activities. Adrian Gilbert foregrounds the forgotten voices of the prisoners themselves by threading eleven individual stories through the narrative. POW is a compelling window onto a crucial aspect of the Second World War.

Sceptre

Schindler's Ark

Thomas Keneally
Authors:
Thomas Keneally
Hodder & Stoughton

The Test of Courage: Michel Thomas

Christopher Robbins
Authors:
Christopher Robbins

Michel Thomas survived French concentration and slave labour camps, endured interrogation and torture and after the war became a Nazi-hunter, capturing important war criminals. It was through these remarkable and terrifying experiences that Thomas came to develop his revolutionary language learning system - a system that is currently taking the world by storm. This is his remarkable story, told by his friend and biographer Christopher Robbins.

An excerpt from the Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

CLOUD ATLAS, by David Mitchell

Read an excerpt of David Mitchell's international bestseller, CLOUD ATLAS, now also releasing as a film.

Thomas Keneally

Thomas Keneally began his writing career in 1964 and has published thirty-one novels since. They include Schindler's Ark, which won the Booker Prize in 1982 and was subsequently made into the film Schindler's List, and The Chant Of Jimmie Blacksmith, Confederates and Gossip From The Forest, each of which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent novels are The Daughters Of Mars, which was shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize in 2013, Shame and the Captives and Crimes of the Father. He has also written several works of non-fiction, including his memoir Homebush Boy, Searching for Schindler and Australians. He is married with two daughters and lives in Sydney.

Chapter One: Suicide Corner

SCARP by Nick Papadimitriou

Read the first chapter of Nick Papadimitriou's SCARP.

Laura Carlin

Laura Carlin left school at 16 to work in retail banking and it was only after leaving her job to write full-time that she discovered her passion for storytelling and exploring pockets of history through fiction. She lives in a book-filled house in beautiful rural Derbyshire with her family (and a very naughty cat). When she's not writing she enjoys walking in the surrounding Peak District. The Wicked Cometh is her first novel.

Chapter One

RIVER OF SMOKE, by Amitav Ghosh

Read the first chapter of Amitav Ghosh's RIVER OF SMOKE, the second book of his Ibis trilogy.

Chapter One: Murdering Mrs Durance

THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS, by Thomas Keneally

Read the first chapter of Sceptre Booker prize-winning author Thomas Keneally's newest novel, THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS.