Related to: 'Gordon Ramsay'

Hodder & Stoughton

Gino's Italian Adriatic Escape

Gino D'Acampo
Authors:
Gino D'Acampo
Hodder & Stoughton

Gordon Ramsay Ultimate Fit Food

Gordon Ramsay
Authors:
Gordon Ramsay

'These are my go-to recipes when I want to eat well at home. My great hope is that they will inspire you to get cooking to improve your own health whatever your personal goal.'GORDON RAMSAYThe dream combination - a Michelin-starred superchef who is also a committed athlete. Gordon knows how important it is to eat well, whether you're training for a triathlon or just leading a busy active life. And just because it's healthy food you don't have to compromise on taste and flavour. The book is divided into three sections, each one offering breakfasts, lunches, suppers, sides and snacks with different health-boosting benefits. The Healthy section consists of nourishing recipes for general wellbeing; the Lean recipes encourage healthy weight loss; and the Fit section features pre- and post-workout dishes to build strength and energise.This is the ultimate collection of recipes that you'll enjoy cooking and eating, and will leave you in great shape whatever your fitness goals.

Hodder & Stoughton

Gino's Healthy Italian for Less

Gino D'Acampo
Authors:
Gino D'Acampo
Hodder & Stoughton

Matilda & The Ramsay Bunch

Matilda Ramsay
Authors:
Matilda Ramsay

Inspired by the third series of hit CBBC cookery show Matilda & The Ramsay Bunch and the family's adventures around California, comes the first cookbook from Tilly Ramsay, including 60 simple, delicious recipes and nourishing recipes to make at home for family and friends - plus tips and tricks from Tilly's superstar chef dad, Gordon. Start your day the Tilly way, with a nourishing Smoothie Bowl, followed by some Vitamin Packed Power Balls for a late morning pick-me-up. Cool down mid-afternoon with a Fro-Yo Cooler, followed by some Lean Machine Chicken and Super Light Raspberry Macaroons. Impress all your friends with a Green Goodness Picnic or throw a fun-filled Ramsay-style Feast of Pulled Pork and Smokey American Beans, with Surprise Rainbow Cake and Hollywood Raspberry Fizz for dessert!The book will encourage Tilly's fans, tweens & teens to start cooking and have some fun with easy-to-follow recipes, that can be enjoyed by all.Chapters will include: Brunch; Sleep-over Feasts; Cook Your Own Dinner; Health Kick; Big Bakes.

Hodder & Stoughton

Gordon Ramsay Bread Street Kitchen

Gordon Ramsay
Authors:
Gordon Ramsay

'If you think you can't eat as well at home as you do in a restaurant - think again. I'm going to show you how to cook stunning recipes from Bread Street Kitchen at home.' GORDON RAMSAYFrom breakfast to dinner and everything in between, this is a collection of 100 fresh new recipes from Gordon Ramsay and the award-winning team at Bread Street Kitchen. Like the restaurant itself, the book is all about relaxed and sociable eating, using fresh ingredients, simple techniques all delivered with the signature Gordon Ramsay stamp so that you know it's going to be good.Recipes include Ricotta Hotcakes with Honeycomb Butter - perfect for a weekend brunch, Sea Trout with Clams or a Crispy Duck Salad for a weekday supper. For a weekend get together, get things off to a good start with a Bread Street Kitchen Rum Punch and Slow Roast Pork Belly with Apple & Cinnamon Sauce, followed by Pineapple Carpaccio with Coconut Sorbet or a super indulgent Coconut Strawberry Trifle.

Hodder & Stoughton

Terry & George - Feeding Friends

Terry Edwards, George Craig
Authors:
Terry Edwards, George Craig

'Terry's recipes are as fun to prepare as they are to eat and share, and Feeding Friends is the kind of book that will get grubby and well-used in the home and holiday kitchen. It's for anyone who loves entertaining friends. So happy friendly feeding.' Mark Hix, chef and restaurateur'Wonderful ideas beautifully crafted and filled with northern soul, just like George.' Christopher Bailey, Burberry Chief Creative and Chief Executive Officer'What a great book, a real fun read, some wicked recipes but always approachable. I can see myself using it a lot.' David Moore, two Michelin-starred restaurateurTerry & George's legendary pop-up events are all about bringing people together to enjoy good friends and make happy memories. They have been described as 'Britain's most fashionable foodies' (The Times). Inspired by British ingredients and culture, their pop-up restaurant company Check On (www.checkonpresents.co.uk) has created spectacular sell-out events in venues across London, Manchester, New York and Hollywood. Their menus include 'Northern Invasion' where they serve their version of: the Lancashire HotpotToad-in-the-HoleBakewell TartAnd 'Hen Party' which features: Spineless ChickenTruffled Chips ...followed by a pudding of Eggs and Soldiers (eggshells filled with crème brulee, mango jelly and accompanied by shortbread soldiers for dipping). Terry and George's food is all about classic British dishes with a twist. This is their first book and it contains over 100 original recipes, including signature dishes such as George's Marvellous Medicine and Shell Fish & Chips. This is food made for sharing and enjoying at home. Good times guaranteed.'Event dining you can do at home' YOU Magazine

Hodder & Stoughton

Crème de la Crème

Martin Chiffers, Emma Marsden
Authors:
Martin Chiffers, Emma Marsden

Make your cooking the crème de la crème - learn the tips and tricks of Britain's greatest pastry chefs with the book of the spectacular BBC series, from the team behind Great British Bake Off.With patisserie skills broken down to their simplest elements, you will soon be familiar with the ingredients, equipment and chemistry behind the showstopping creations you see on-screen and in the best restaurants, and be inspired to make your own irresistibly indulgent treats.From croissants to intricately layered slices and eye-catching petit gateaux, each mouth-watering recipe is illustrated with stunning photographs and accompanied by expert advice on equipment and how to achieve a truly professional finish.The recipes covered include:Baking and ViennoiserieLayered slicesPatisseriePetit gateauxTartsClassic puddings and dessertsPetit Fours and biscuitsThe perfect book for Great British Bake Off fans wanting to take their bakes to the next level, or anyone inspired by the BBC series to find out more about the secrets of great patisserie.

Two Roads

Trumbo

Bruce Cook
Authors:
Bruce Cook

NOMINATED FOR OSCAR, BAFTA AND GOLDEN GLOBE AWARDS (BRYAN CRANSTON, BEST ACTOR)Dalton Trumbo was the central figure of the infamous 'Hollywood Ten,' the screenwriters who, during the McCarthy era, were charged by the House Committee on Un-American Acitivities for their associations with the Communist Party. Due to their refusal to cooperate during the investigation, Trumbo and his fellow screenwriters were declared in contempt of Congress and were ultimately blacklisted from Hollywood and some were even jailed. Although Trumbo was one of several hundred writers, directors, producers, and actors who were deprived of the opportunity to work in the motion picture industry from 1947 to 1960, he won an Oscar under the pseudonym Robert Rich for The Brave One in 1956, and he was the first to see his name on the big screen again in 1960 with Exodus, one of the year's biggest movies.All his life Trumbo was a radical of the homegrown, independent variety. From his early days in Colorado, where his grandfather was a county sheriff, to his time in Los Angeles, where he organized a bakery strike and was even a bootlegger, to his time as an author when he wrote the powerful pacifist novel Johnny Got His Gun, to his heyday as a top-paid (and frequently broke) Hollywood screenwriter-where his credits include Roman Holiday, Spartacus, Papillon, Lonely Are the Brave, Thirty Seconds Over Tokyo, The Brave One, and Kitty Foyle-his life rivaled anything he had created.Written with Dalton Trumbo's full cooperation, at a moment when he himself did not know how much time he had left, Trumbo is a candid tale of a colorful figure who was at the epicenter of a tumultuous period in recent American history.

Saltyard Books

Prashad At Home

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

Since winning everyone over on Ramsay's Best Restaurant, Prashad has grown in size and reputation, and so too has the Patel family. In this, their second book, Kaushy returns the focus to the heart of Indian home cooking. Traditional recipes have been simplified using readily available ingredients. These are the quick dishes that can be prepared in the evenings when you're tired after work, meals to leave bubbling away while you relax at the weekend and feasts for special occasions - as well as everything you need to serve alongside: the breads, the rice and the chutneys. You'll also find many recipes drawing influence from British, Chinese and Italian cuisines - a perfect combining of cultures in the kitchen. And, because Gujaratis are well known for their sweet teeth, there are plenty of snacks and treats too. Life is all about balance after all. Times have changed and what we eat should suit our lifestyle, but whether you have 20 minutes or two hours, cooking should be enjoyed, bringing both you and those you are cooking for pleasure.From bhajis to feast biryanis to beans on toast, Gujarati-style, here are more than 100 recipes to bring warmth, taste and texture into your home, all made with the Patel's characteristic love and passion for vegetarian food.

Saltyard Books

Honey & Co: The Baking Book

Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer
Authors:
Itamar Srulovich, Sarit Packer

Our day is marked by what comes out of the pastry section, and there's always something good on the way: sticky buns full of cherries and pistachios in the morning; a loaf of rich dough rolled with chocolate, hazelnuts and cinnamon that has been proving since dawn and comes out of the oven fresh for elevenses. Lunch is a crisp, crumbly shell of pastry filled with spiced lamb or burnt aubergine, and at teatime there are cheesecakes and fruit cakes, small cakes and massive cookies - so many cakes that it's hard to choose one. (There's no need to worry, whatever you choose will be great!) After dinner there might be poached peaches with roses or something more traditional, sweet and salty Knafe drenched in orange blossom syrup, or maybe just a small piece of fresh marzipan. There's something sweet, something in the oven for everyone, all day long - welcome to Honey & Co.

Hodder & Stoughton

Gordon Ramsay's Ultimate Home Cooking

Gordon Ramsay
Authors:
Gordon Ramsay
Saltyard Books

Prashad Cookbook

Kaushy Patel
Authors:
Kaushy Patel

100 delicious vegetarian Indian recipes from Gordon Ramsay's Best Restaurant runner-up Prashad. The Patels and Prashad, their small Indian restaurant in Bradford, were the surprise stars of Ramsay's Best Restaurant TV show in autumn 2010. Everyone who saw them fell in love with this inspirational family dedicated to serving delicious, original vegetarian food.At the heart of the family is Kaushy, who learned to cook as a child growing up on her grandmother's farm in northern India. On moving to northern England in the 1960s, she brought her passion for fabulous flavours with her and has been perfecting and creating dishes ever since. Never happier than when feeding people, Kaushy took her son Bobby at his word when he suggested that she should share her cooking with the world - a launderette was converted first in to a deli and then a restaurant, and Prashad was born.Now Kaushy shares her cooking secrets - you'll find more than 100 recipes, from simple snacks to sumptuous family dinners, to help you recreate the authentic Prashad experience at home. Whether it's cinnamon-spice chickpea curry, green banana satay, spicy sweetcorn or chaat - the king of street-side India - there's plenty here for everyone to savour and share.

Hodder & Stoughton

Gordon Ramsay's Ultimate Cookery Course

Gordon Ramsay
Authors:
Gordon Ramsay

"I want to teach you how to cook good food at home. By stripping away all the hard graft and complexity, anyone can produce mouth-watering recipes. Put simply, I'm going to show you how to cook yourself into a better cook."GORDON RAMSAYGordon Ramsay's Ultimate Cookery Course is about giving home cooks the desire, confidence and inspiration to hit the stoves and get cooking, with over 120 modern, simple and accessible recipes. The ultimate reference bible, it's a lifetime's worth of expertise from one of the world's finest chefs distilled into a beautiful book.

Hodder & Stoughton

How to Eat Out

Giles Coren
Authors:
Giles Coren

It has taken Giles Coren a lifetime to master the art of eating out.From a lonely childhood spent in restaurant car parks, peering in at a magical world of chickens in baskets and butter in little foil squares, to belching his way through fifty pointless manifestations of nitrogen-chilled excreta at 'the best restaurant in the world', to the sticky corner of Bangkok's Chinatown where he sat his own baby daughter down in front of her first jellied iguana foot and was genuinely surprised when she didn't like it, Coren has experienced pretty much everything a restaurant can throw at you, and thrown it right back. Or at least caught it, sniffed it, and bagged it up for later.Bad waiters, bum tables, little rip-offs, big cons, old fish, cheap meat, yesterday's soup and tomorrow's gastroenteritis... Coren tells you how to avoid the lot, and even come out of it with free champagne and a dish named after you by way of apology.It doesn't matter if it's fish and chips, takeaway pizza, a medieval banquet with Sue Perkins or a slap-up nosh at the Hotel de Posh, there is always a right way and wrong way to do it. How to Eat Out is a bit of both.

John Murray

Landfalls

Tim Mackintosh-Smith, Martin Yeoman
Contributors:
Tim Mackintosh-Smith, Martin Yeoman

For Ibn Batuttah of Tangier, being medieval didn't mean sitting at home waiting for renaissances, enlightenments and easyJet. It meant travelling the known world to its limits. Seven centuries on, Tim Mackintosh-Smith's passionate pursuit of the fourteenth-century traveller takes him to landfalls in remote tropical islands, torrid Indian Ocean ports and dusty towns on the shores of the Saharan sand-sea. His zigzag itinerary across time and space leads from Zanzibar to the Alhambra (via the Maldives, Sri Lanka, China, Mauritania and Guinea) and to a climactic conclusion to his quest for the man he calls 'IB' - a man who out-travelled Marco Polo by a factor of three, who spent his days with saints and sultans and his nights with an intercontinental string of slave-concubines.Tim's journey is a search for survivals from IB's world - material, human, spiritual, edible - however, when your fellow traveller has a 700-year head start, familiar notions don't always work.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Acorn House Cookbook

Arthur Potts Dawson
Authors:
Arthur Potts Dawson

Combining great food with environmental principles, growing and shopping tips with a taste of the good life, THE ACORN HOUSE COOKBOOK is a must for those who love cooking and care about the planet. British households dump just under a third of all the food they buy - more than 15p of each £1 spent on food is wasted. Furthermore, about one-fifth of our carbon emissions are related to the production, processing, transport and storage of food.Arthur Potts Dawson is on a mission to change our throwaway habits. With his personal guide to seasonal food and how to cook it, award-winning recipes, and chapters on every aspect of simple, sustainable cooking - from how to source locally-grown to kitting out an eco-kitchen (complete with wormery) - the culinary revolution starts here!

John Goldsmith on The Saint

In 1953, the journalist and author Richard Usborne published a seminal book called Clubland Heroes. It was an affectionate, nostalgia-tinged analysis and celebration of the fictional gentleman-adventurers whose exploits had thrilled him when he was a boy, the protagonists of three immensely popular novelists of the inter-war period: John Buchan’s Richard Hannay, ‘Sapper’s Bulldog Drummond and Dornford Yates’s Jonathan Mansel. These characters had a great deal in common. They all enjoyed substantial private means and were rich enough not to let anything as vulgar as earning a living interfere with their adventuring. They were proudly upper-class and, except in Hannay’s case, Public School and Oxbridge. They had all had damned good wars. They drove Rolls-Royces. They were viscerally racist and anti-Semitic. They believed in rough justice, an eye for a tooth, in stepping in where plodding policemen feared to tread, or were unable to tread because of inferior birth and breeding. They regularly bumped off the villains on the grounds – if they thought about it at all – that they were simply saving the hangman the bother. Crucially, they were all members of London Clubs, those exclusive enclaves in the St. James’s area, where the elite lunched and dined in splendour, wreathed in cigar smoke, waited on by silent, obsequious servants. But there was another writer, competing in the same market, equally successful, equally adored by generations of school-boys. His name was Leslie Charteris and his hero was Simon Templar, the Saint. Usborne does not ignore Charteris and the Saint entirely. He does something rather more disagreeable: he dismisses them both in a few disparaging lines. The Saint, he feels, is a lesser character than Hannay, Drummond and Mansel; Charteris is a lesser writer than Buchan, ‘Sapper’ and Yates. In the strict technical sense, Usborne is right not to include the Saint in his pantheon because Simon Templar would not have been seen dead in one of those stuffy St. James’s clubs. Indeed, throughout the Charteris oeuvre the Saint is devastatingly satirical about the denizens of such places, with their snobbery, prejudices, prudery and superannuated political opinions. (Hannay, Drummond and Mansel were all firmly of the Conservative Right.) But in writing off the Saint as a character and Charteris as a prose stylist, Usborne was wrong. I first encountered the Saint, as I did the other three, in the 1950s when I was banged up in a prep school in Hertfordshire. Even for that dismal era, the school was a time warp, a little world of its own that would still have been comfortably familiar to Hannay, Drummond and Mansel but which would have excited the Saint’s mockery – and pity for its young inmates. We were taught to worship Games and (a grimly Protestant) God. In the Cadet Corps we were trained to bayonet the Hun – as per the First World War – rather than the Boche of the Second World War. For competitive events – almost all sporting – the school was divided into sets named after military heroes: Roberts, Kitchener, Haig and Beatty. Our physical horizons were bounded by the red-brick turrets and walls of the school buildings, reminiscent of a Victorian prison, and fenced, gated playing fields and parkland. Beyond lay forbidden territory, strictly out of bounds, inhabited mainly by dangerous ruffians called oiks. Our intellectual horizons were limited to a curriculum designed for a sole purpose: to get one into a decent public school. The food was abominable, the school rules numberless and enforced by the frequent swishing of cane and slipper. Into this narrow, isolated realm stepped the Saint. He was dashing, debonair, didn’t give a damn about rules and regulations, lived by his own code, went where he wanted to go, did what he wanted to do, leaving policeman and criminal alike gasping in his wake. He didn’t drive a boring, boxy Rolls-Royce; he drove a sleek, superfast Hirondel. He was a citizen of the world, perfectly at home in any great city where, of course, he would know which was the best hotel and the finest restaurant, and where there was always an old friend to lend a hand in his latest endeavour. He was rich, yes, but the money didn’t come from a country estate or a share portfolio: he earned it by creaming off his usual ten per cent of the booty or scooping a reward. He was a free spirit, openminded, without a racist or anti-Semitic bone in his immaculately clothed body. His adventures sprang naturally out of his globe-trotting life, his insatiable curiosity about everything and everybody, his infallible nose for a mystery, his quixotic sense of justice. He was witty. He was clever. He had style, panache. He killed, certainly, but mostly in self-defence, and his preferred modus operandi was to step deftly aside and let dog eat dog. He never displayed the sadistic relish of Bulldog Drummond, the patriotic fervour of Richard Hannay, or the Old Testament righteousness of Jonathan Mansel. Most thrilling of all, perhaps, he lived openly with a woman, Patricia Holm, who was not his wife and whose charms could be only furtively and feverishly imagined. Although I loved reading about Hannay, Drummond and Mansel, they were, in a sense, only Senior Prefects writ large. They conformed to the rules – indeed, they strictly imposed them on others. They would triumph on the cricket field, the football pitch and in the boxing ring and eventually rise to be Head Boy. The Saint, by contrast, might perhaps win the Poetry Prize but would undoubtedly be expelled. He was completely different. He was a liberator. He pointed a finger, or rather two fingers, with a cigarette held nonchalantly between them, towards a wider, more sophisticated world. He showed that silly or irksome rules could and should be circumvented, pomposity laughed at, an individual path pursued. So much for the character. What of the literary skills of his creator? It was only years later, when I had the job of adapting some of the stories for the screen, that I came fully to appreciate what a superb writer Leslie Charteris was. The first task of the adaptor is to analyse the plot. I quickly discovered that in terms of the overall impact of a given story, the plot plays a relatively minor role. Certainly, the plots are well, often brilliantly, constructed, with all the requisite twists and turns and surprises and – most important – a rigorous logic. But the real fascination lies elsewhere: in description, in the development of a particular situation or scene, above all, in dialogue. The prose is spare and sinewy where the pace of the narrative demands it, but where there is space for a pause, Charteris fills it with paragraph after paragraph, sometimes page after page, of highly entertaining, perfectly honed writing, with a lightness of touch and a refined humour worthy of P.G. Wodehouse. (‘By the tum-tum of Tutankhaman!’ the Saint exclaims to Mr Teal in the first story in the present collection. Bertie Wooster himself couldn’t have put it better.) The dyspeptic critic might dismiss all this as mere padding: Charteris either lacked the powers of invention or was simply too idle to construct an elaborate plot and made up for it by shoving in a lot of extraneous guff. This would be to miss the point completely. The minimisation of plot and maximisation of other elements is the warp and woof of the Charteris style. What other thriller writer would think of (or dare to proceed with) spicing up a murder mystery with satirical verse? And the verse itself is worthy of Ogden Nash: Trained from an early age to rule (At that immortal Public School Whose playing fields have helped to lose Innumerable Waterloos), His brains, his wit, his chin, were all Infinitesimal . . . So how does Charteris, the prose stylist, measure up to the writers Usborne set above him? Take ‘Sapper’, the nom-deplume of an offi cer-turned-prison governor called H.C. McNeile. His literary skills can most charitably be described as workmanlike. There is none of the verve, vivacity and pure relish for words that you find in Charteris. And the character of Drummond himself verges on the Fascistic. John Buchan is a much better writer, a fine writer in fact, but his plots rely unnervingly on coincidence and his attempts to reproduce the slang of the criminal classes, or even worse of Americans, are embarrassing. Dornford Yates is in a category of his own. He developed a unique style, full of archaisms and purple passages that some admire (I am one of them) and others find ludicrous. His plotting is superb, perhaps because his method was never to know himself, at the end of a day’s writing, what was going to happen next. But he is most definitely an acquired taste. By any standard, Leslie Charteris is worthy to stand beside Buchan and Yates – and well above ‘Sapper’. And in The Saint and Mr Teal he is on top form. He was twenty-six when he wrote it and it has all the freshness and vigour of an early work. The three stories are exciting, surprising, funny – and great, great fun. The character of the Saint is fully formed, with all the swashbuckling sparkle that kept him alive through the following decades and saw him emerge, in the form of the incomparable Roger Moore, as a globally recognised figure. In the late 1970s I found myself one day in a remote fishing village on the coast of Brazil. When I told the locals that I was a writer they naturally asked me what I had written. I mentioned various novels and television shows, all of which were met with blank stares. But when I mentioned the Saint faces lit up, recognition was instant. It was smiles and ecstatic cries of ‘El Santo! El Santo!’ all round. The Saint had travelled a long, long way. He is still travelling. - John Goldsmith

Chapter One

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, by John le Carré

Read the first chapter of John le Carré's acclaimed TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, now a major film.

Chapter One: A Morning in Vermillion

SHADES OF GREY, by Jasper Fforde

Read the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's brilliant SHADES OF GREY.

Kaushy Patel

Kaushy learned to cook as a child on her grandmother's farm in northern India, coming to live in the UK in the 1960s. The success of the deli in Bradford she ran for 22 years with her husband led to the opening of Prashad, the restaurant, serving authentic Gujarati cuisine. Award-winning Prashad has now become a destination for food-lovers and fans of vegetarian cooking. Last year saw the launch of a new venture: Bundobust, in Leeds, championing traditional Indian streetfood dishes with craft beers.Kaushy's skills both as a professional chef and as a home cook, and her wide knowledge and enthusiasm will inspire you to get into the kitchen and get out your spice jars. www.prashad.co.ukFollow Prashad on Twitter: @Prashad_veggie