Related to: 'Constance Briscoe'

John Murray

Shortest Way Home

Peter Buttigieg
Authors:
Peter Buttigieg

Once described by the Washington Post as "the most interesting mayor you've never heard of," Pete Buttigieg, the thirty-seven-year-old mayor of South Bend, Indiana, has now emerged as one of America's most visionary politicians. With soaring prose that celebrates a resurgent American Midwest, Shortest Way Home narrates the heroic transformation of a "dying city" (Newsweek) into nothing less than a shining model of urban reinvention.Elected at twenty-nine as the nation's youngest mayor, Pete Buttigieg immediately recognized that "great cities, and even great nations, are built through attention to the everyday." As Shortest Way Home recalls, the challenges were daunting?whether confronting gun violence, renaming a street in honor of Martin Luther King Jr., or attracting tech companies to a city that had appealed more to junk bond scavengers than serious investors. None of this is underscored more than Buttigieg's audacious campaign to reclaim 1,000 houses, many of them abandoned, in 1,000 days and then, even as a sitting mayor, deploying to serve in Afghanistan as a Navy officer. Yet the most personal challenge still awaited Buttigieg, who came out in a South Bend Tribune editorial, just before being reelected with 78 percent of the vote, and then finding Chasten Glezman, a middle-school teacher, who would become his partner for life.While Washington reels with scandal, Shortest Way Home, with its graceful, often humorous, language, challenges our perception of the typical American politician. In chronicling two once-unthinkable stories?that of an Afghanistan veteran who came out and found love and acceptance, all while in office, and that of a revitalized Rust Belt city no longer regarded as "flyover country" Buttigieg provides a new vision for America's shortest way home.

John Murray

Court Number One

Thomas Grant
Authors:
Thomas Grant

Court Number One of the Old Bailey is the most famous court room in the world, and the venue of some of the most sensational human dramas ever to be played out in a criminal trial.The principal criminal court of England, historically reserved for the more serious and high-profile trials, Court Number One opened its doors in 1907 after the building of the 'new' Old Bailey. In the decades that followed it witnessed the trials of the most famous and infamous defendants of the twentieth century. It was here that the likes of Madame Fahmy, Lord Haw Haw, John Christie, Ruth Ellis, George Blake (and his unlikely jailbreakers, Michael Randle and Pat Pottle), Jeremy Thorpe and Ian Huntley were defined in history, alongside a wide assortment of other traitors, lovers, politicians, psychopaths, spies, con men and - of course - the innocent. Not only notorious for its murder trials, Court Number One recorded the changing face of modern British society, bearing witness to alternate attitudes to homosexuality, the death penalty, freedom of expression, insanity and the psychology of violence. Telling the stories of twelve of the most scandalous and celebrated cases across a radically shifting century, this book traces the evolving attitudes of Britain, the decline of a society built on deference and discretion, the tensions brought by a more permissive society and the rise of trial by mass media.From the Sunday Times bestselling author of Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories, Court Number One is a mesmerising window onto the thrills, fears and foibles of the modern age.(P) Hodder & Stoughton Ltd

Hodder & Stoughton

Martin Chuzzlewit

Charles Dickens
Authors:
Charles Dickens
Hodder & Stoughton

The Lost Lamb on Honeysuckle Lane

Lucy Daniels
Authors:
Lucy Daniels

**Summer Days at Sunrise Farm, the new book in the Animal Ark revisited series, is currently available for pre-order!**It's summertime in the little village of Welford. The sun beams down on the rolling green Yorkshire hills, and the scent of freshly cut grass is in the air. Local vet Mandy Hope and her boyfriend Jimmy Marsh are happily setting up their new home, and life at animal rescue centre Hope Meadows is as busy as ever. When the Welford Garden Committee announces a Midsummer Fair, Mandy is thrilled to be invited to judge the animal-themed fancy dress competition. The whole of Welford turns out for the fair, and the fancy dress competition is a roaring success. Three-year-old Herbie and eighteen-month-old Kiran come as Bo Beep and her lost sheep and Mandy can't help but melt. Maybe having children of her own isn't such a ridiculous idea after all? But in the euphoric mayhem of the day, little Kiran goes missing and a frantic search ensures. When the lost lamb is rumoured to have been seen on nearby Honeysuckle Lane, it's all hands on deck to solve the mystery and restore him to his rightful home. Based on the bestselling Animal Ark series, this is the perfect read for fans of Lily Graham, Heidi Swain and Holly Martin. Why readers are falling in love with the Animal Ark Revisited series:'A stunning, emotional, beautiful tale of friendship, love, and the importance of being who you need to be' Books of All Kinds 'A wonderful, heart-warming story... I couldn't turn the pages quickly enough!' With Love For Books'Such a wonderfully warm and cosy read - you can curl up and lose yourself in a gorgeous story full of animals in a lovely village.' Bookworms and Shutterbugs'I was enchanted... a wonderful story; one that I completely loved' Rachel's Random Reads'A gorgeous book to curl up with' Shaz's Book Blog'I LOVED this book! I couldn't give it anything less than a 5-star review' Netgalley, 5 stars

Hodder & Stoughton

Black Sheep and Prodigals

Dave Tomlinson
Authors:
Dave Tomlinson

'Very interesting, it's all about not alienating people before they even think about crossing the threshold of where you worship.' Chris Evans, BBC Radio 2Do you feel more at home on the edges of faith than at the centre? Would you call yourself a bit of a black sheep? Too often Christian spirituality has been associated with conformity, or a subculture where people don't feel able to ask questions. But Dave Tomlinson, author of How to be a bad Christian, doesn't think it has to be like this; instead, our spiritual communities can be 'laboratories of the Spirit' - places where we can explore issues of faith and spirit with openness, imagination and creativity. Welcome to black sheep spirituality - where doubts and questions are an essential part of faith; where difference of opinion is a sign of a secure community; where divine revelation is embraced wherever it is found - in the arts, science and the natural world as well as religious tradition; and where faith is something that is lived and practised rather than embalmed in beliefs or ritual.'Theology for anyone and everyone' BBC Radio 2

Nicholas Brealey International

Breaking Free of Bonkers

George Binney, Philip Glanfield, Gerhard Wilke
Authors:
George Binney, Philip Glanfield, Gerhard Wilke

IS IT JUST ME OR IS EVERYTHING AROUND HERE BONKERS?Do you ever feel bewildered or even oppressed by what goes on in your organization? Does anything ever strike you as odd, ridiculous, inefficient or just plain bonkers? Chances are you are not alone. No matter what industry, sector or institution, the world of work can often seem bonkers. We can spend so much time ticking boxes, preparing plans and reports, sitting in unproductive meetings, replying to unhelpful emails and trying to deliver on misconceived, top-down initiatives that the time to do real work is squeezed out. Breaking Free of Bonkers shows you how it is possible to make progress despite the mad and messy world of today's organisations. Against the odds, it is possible to lead effectively.George Binney, Phil Glanfield and Gerhard Wilke are three organisation consultants from Ashridge Business School. They have an unusual vantage point. Drawing on their long experience of working with people at levels - from chief executives to front line workers - they offer hope. They use a wealth of lively examples and illustrations to show you how to get connected with colleagues, get real about what you offer and get going on the things that matter.

Hodder & Stoughton

Martin Luther

Peter Stanford
Authors:
Peter Stanford

'A compelling biography of one of the greatest men of the modern age. Stanford is particularly brilliant on the tensions inside Luther's private and spiritual life. This is a very fine book, written with a flourish.' Melvyn BraggThe 31st of October 2017 marks the 500th anniversary of Martin Luther pinning his 95 'Theses' - or reform proposals - to the door of his local university church in Wittenberg. Most scholars now agree that the details of this eye-catching gesture are more legend than hammer and nails, but what is certainly true is that on this day (probably in a letter to his local Archbishop in Mainz), the Augustinian Friar and theologian issued an outspokenly blunt challenge to his own Catholic Church to reform itself from within - especially over the sale of 'indulgences' - which ultimately precipitated a huge religious and political upheaval right across Europe and divided mainstream Christianity ever after.A new, popular biography from journalist Peter Stanford, looking at Martin Luther from within his Catholic context, examining his actual aims for Catholicism as well as his enduring legacy - and where he might fit within the church today. 'Peter Stanford makes the life of Luther into a thrilling narrative, told from a modern Catholic perspective' Antonia Fraser

John Murray

Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories

Thomas Grant
Authors:
Thomas Grant

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLERSHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA NON-FICTION DAGGER'Thomas Grant has brought together Hutchinson's greatest legal hits, producing a fascinating episodic cultural history of post-war Britain that chronicles the end of deference and secrecy, and the advent of a more permissive society . . . Grant brings out the essence of each case, and Hutchinson's role, with clarity and wit' Ben Macintyre, The Times'An excellent book . . . Grant recounts these trials in limpid prose which clarifies obscurities. A delicious flavouring of cool irony, which is so much more effective than hot indignation, covers his treatment of the small-mindedness and cheapness behind some prosecutions' Richard Davenport-Hines, GuardianBorn in 1915 into the fringes of the Bloomsbury Group, Jeremy Hutchinson went on to become the greatest criminal barrister of the 1960s, '70s and '80s. The cases of that period changed society for ever and Hutchinson's role in them was second to none. In Case Histories, Jeremy Hutchinson's most remarkable trials are examined, each one providing a fascinating look into Britain's post-war social, political and cultural history.Accessibly and entertainingly written, Case Histories provides a definitive account of Jeremy Hutchinson's life and work. From the sex and spying scandals which contributed to Harold Macmillan's resignation in 1963 and the subsequent fall of the Conservative government, to the fight against literary censorship through his defence of Lady Chatterley's Lover and Fanny Hill, Hutchinson was involved in many of the great trials of the period. He defended George Blake, Christine Keeler, Great Train robber Charlie Wilson, Kempton Bunton (the only man successfully to 'steal' a picture from the National Gallery), art 'faker' Tom Keating, and Howard Marks who, in a sensational defence, was acquitted of charges relating to the largest importation of cannabis in British history. He also prevented the suppression of Bernardo Bertolucci's notorious film Last Tango in Paris and did battle with Mary Whitehouse when she prosecuted the director of the play Romans in Britain.Above all else, Jeremy Hutchinson's career, both at the bar and later as a member of the House of Lords, has been one devoted to the preservation of individual liberty and to resisting the incursions of an overbearing state. Case Histories provides entertaining, vivid and revealing insights into what was really going on in those celebrated courtroom dramas that defined an age, as well as painting a picture of a remarkable life.To listen to Jeremy Hutchinson being interviewed by Helena Kennedy on BBC Radio 4's A Law Unto Themselves, please follow the link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04d4cpvYou can also listen to him on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs with Kirsty Young: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03ddz8m

Hodder & Stoughton

Vendetta

John Follain, John Follain
Authors:
John Follain, John Follain

On 23 May 1992 the Mafia assassinated its 'Number One Enemy', the legendary prosecutor Judge Falcone, with a motorway bomb that also killed his wife Francesca and three bodyguards. Fifty-seven days later, the Mafia killed Falcone's friend and colleague, Judge Paolo Borsellino, with a car bomb outside his mother's home that also killed five bodyguards. These two murders changed forever how Italy viewed the Mafia. VENDETTA tells the inside story of the assassination plots and the investigation that followed. Follain reveals Borsellino's desperate race against time to find out who killed his friend while knowing he was next on the list and reveals the daring undercover police mission which unmasked the killers. Based on new and exclusive interviews and the testimony of investigators, Mafia supergrasses, survivors, relatives and friends, VENDETTA recounts the events hour-by-hour, minute-by-minute as the Mafiosi plan and carry out the murders, and as the police hunt them down.

Hodder & Stoughton

Wired For God?

Charles Foster
Authors:
Charles Foster

Human religious experiences are remarkably uniform; many can be pharmacologically induced. Recent research into the neurology of religious experience has shown that, when worshipping or praying, a certain part of the brain, apparently dormant during other activities, becomes active. What does all this mean for those of faith and those with none? In this fascinating book barrister Charles Foster takes a survey of the evidence - from shamans to medieval mystics, to out-of-body experiences and epilepsy, via Jerusalem and middle-class Christianity - and assesses its significance. Written in short, accessible chapters, this is a fascinating tour of religious and mystical experiences and their relation to human physiology.

Hodder Paperbacks

Gypsy Boy on the Run

Mikey Walsh
Authors:
Mikey Walsh
Hodder Paperbacks

Ugly

Constance Briscoe
Authors:
Constance Briscoe

Constance's mother systematically abused her daughter, both physically and emotionally, throughout her childhood. Regularly beaten and starved, the girl was so desperate she took herself off to Social Services and tried to get taken into care. When that failed, she swallowed bleach 'because it kills all known germs and my mother always told me I was a germ'. When Constance was thirteen, her mother simply moved out, leaving her daughter to fend for herself: there was no gas, no electricity and no food. But somehow Constance found the courage to survive her terrible start in life. This is her heartrending - and ultimately triumphant - story, now with fourteen extra chapters detailing the trial.

Hodder & Stoughton

Nowhere to Belong

Harmony Brookes
Authors:
Harmony Brookes
Hodder & Stoughton

Beyond Ugly

Constance Briscoe
Authors:
Constance Briscoe

Chapter One

COLD GRAVE by Kathryn Fox

Read the first chapter of Kathryn Fox's latest thriller, COLD GRAVE.

Thomas Grant

Thomas Grant QC is a practising barrister and author. He lives in Sussex and London.

Things you overhear as a thriller writer. . .

Overheard conversations

IF YOU are interested in the ins and outs of human behaviour, few things are more fascinating than the conversations of people sitting next to you in a cafe. It is part crossword puzzle - the deciphering of this particular relationship - and part psychoanalysis. Why did she say that? What is he really getting at? The way we can say one thing and mean another: this truism is so much more obvious when you are not actually engaged in the conversation yourself. Or to me it is. Weirdly, as we are leaving, I often discover my partner doesn’t share my opinion about the marriage of the couple at the next table. Sometimes he hasn’t even noticed there [start itals]was[end itals] a couple at the next table. I have spent a lot more time than usual in cafes over the last few weeks. I have a novel to finish, a thriller, and we have the builders in. The house is noisy and a man is liable to appear at a window at any moment. Normally I wouldn’t mind a man appearing at the window, but it can be disarming when you are in the middle of a creepy passage. My new book is about an abusive relationship, the possibility of pseudosuicide (pretending you are dead when you are not), the dark side of human nature, but I have been writing it in cosy nooks in south London, helped on my way by a nice cup of coffee and the smell of baking. And the thing is - and I know it might be because, as I am supposed to be working, I am, unusually, trying [start itals]not[end itals] to listen - but I have noticed this odd thing. The conversations around me have started to take a rather sinister turn.  The other day, I was in Lavish Habit in Balham where they sell jewellery and bits of vintage furniture (as well as delicious coconut toast). A young couple eating lunch were idly discussing their future (“I think I could live in Bath”; “Yeah. I could live in Bath. But not ‘til I’m much older, like 30”) when the woman, a petite brunette in clumpy wedge shoes, mentioned she had just declined a party invitation. The man put down his knife and fork and adjusted the neck of his close-fitting polo-shirt. “Did you even mention me?”  “Why? You’ve got to come up with your own excuse.” “We’re a couple aren’t we? We either go together or not at all. Not to is ... it’s not... coupling.” “I’d still go if you were busy.” “Would you?” “Yes.” “You wouldn’t.”
“I would.”
“You wouldn’t.” I felt uncomfortable. Was I just imagining the threat implicit in the repetition of “wouldn’t”? He was just staring at her. She just carried on eating her quiche and salad, but in my own head I fast-forwarded to their life in Bath, aged 30, her isolated from her friends, her family, his increasing demands... Later, three women with babies bustled through the door - a lot of pram negotiation, and chair-scraping. They sat right close to my desk (I mean table), which seemed slightly aggressive in itself, though I was probably being paranoid. I think they had just had been into the nail bar next door, because one of them had the leaflet, and they were looking at it while they talked. Their main topic was another woman they all knew.  “Hannah was quiet for Hannah.” “She’s usually... such a character.” (Small laugh.) “Her heart’s in the right place.” “How is her mother?” “Not long left.” “N’ah. Shame. Particularly as she’s lost just her father as well.” “God, pedicures are expensive.” How extraordinary, I thought, that they could be so callous, move so effortlessly from the death of a friend’s two parents to the price of a gel nail. And not just that. On the surface, they had appeared to be complimentary about poor Hannah - ‘“such a character”,  “her heart’s in the right place” - and yet both comments were actually barbed and not really very kind at all. And if I was Hannah, deranged by grief, and I knew that these smug women with their leisurely lives and their pedicure leaflets were talking about me in that way, well, I wouldn’t like to predict the consequences. I left that cafe, and I went somewhere else the next day - Deli Boutique in Clapham, a new French-run establishment that serves crepes to school children after 3.30pm. It was quiet enough in the morning, though a woman next to me did keep talking about how “disgusting”  it was that her daughter’s teacher didn’t return her emails. (The teeth-clenched force behind that most visceral of adjectives suggested a more generalised anger that could do with specialist help). Lunchtime, though, I became aware of latent violence in many of the throwaway remarks wafting over the aroma of  hot cheese and ham croissant. “I’m going to have to say something. I can’t live like this.” And “It’s the groaning I can’t bear.” And: “If this job doesn’t come up trumps I’m going to slit my wrists.”  Two men in jeans were standing at the counter, waiting for a takeaway chicken pie.  “Who’s left of your team now Andy’s ...gone?” one of them said casually to the other. “Just me and Layla,” the second man said. The first man's mouth dropped open.  “You’re all that’s left?” Left where? I mean, probably they were just talking about work, redundancies, but I didn’t like the rigid fix of the second man’s jaw. Who was Layla? Did she mind being on her own with him? What had happened to all the others? I walked home a little after that - a nice walk across the common. A man with a beard in a heavy camouflage jacket was talking loudly just ahead of me his mobile phone. “Are you still going on about the kitchen?” he was saying. He had a forthright posh accent. “Are you still complaining? What do you want now? I trust them OK?” He listened for a bit and then started really shouting. “I cannot listen to this any more. I have a troop to organise to Afghanistan. Do you really think I care about the kitchen? Just shut up. OK. SHUT UP. If you don’t shut up I’m going to come home and blow your head off. Do you hear me? Blow your head off.” Well. I scurried across the grass pretty quickly after that. I actually think he was  following me because he left the path too, and I don’t know why he would have done that otherwise. I was out of breath when I reached the safety of the main road. A friend was waiting with her dog to cross at the lights. I told her what I had just overheard. I didn’t think he was a real soldier, I said. He was clearly mad. Dangerous. She looked at me and then she looked back over the common. The sun had come out, dappling through the leaves. A few ducks idly floated on the pond. “How’s the book?” she said.

Things you overhear as a thriller writer. . .

Sabine Durrant - Overheard conversations

IF YOU are interested in the ins and outs of human behaviour, few things are more fascinating than the conversations of people sitting next to you in a cafe. It is part crossword puzzle - the deciphering of this particular relationship - and part psychoanalysis. Why did she say that? What is he really getting at? The way we can say one thing and mean another: this truism is so much more obvious when you are not actually engaged in the conversation yourself. Or to me it is. Weirdly, as we are leaving, I often discover my partner doesn’t share my opinion about the marriage of the couple at the next table. Sometimes he hasn’t even noticed there was a couple at the next table. I have spent a lot more time than usual in cafes over the last few weeks. I have a novel to finish, a thriller, and we have the builders in. The house is noisy and a man is liable to appear at a window at any moment. Normally I wouldn’t mind a man appearing at the window, but it can be disarming when you are in the middle of a creepy passage. My new book is about an abusive relationship, the possibility of pseudosuicide (pretending you are dead when you are not), the dark side of human nature, but I have been writing it in cosy nooks in south London, helped on my way by a nice cup of coffee and the smell of baking. And the thing is - and I know it might be because, as I am supposed to be working, I am, unusually, trying [start itals]not[end itals] to listen - but I have noticed this odd thing. The conversations around me have started to take a rather sinister turn. The other day, I was in Lavish Habit in Balham where they sell jewellery and bits of vintage furniture (as well as delicious coconut toast). A young couple eating lunch were idly discussing their future (“I think I could live in Bath”; “Yeah. I could live in Bath. But not ‘til I’m much older, like 30”) when the woman, a petite brunette in clumpy wedge shoes, mentioned she had just declined a party invitation. The man put down his knife and fork and adjusted the neck of his close-fitting polo-shirt. “Did you even mention me?” “Why? You’ve got to come up with your own excuse.” “We’re a couple aren’t we? We either go together or not at all. Not to is ... it’s not... coupling.” “I’d still go if you were busy.” “Would you?” “Yes.” “You wouldn’t.”
“I would.”
“You wouldn’t.” I felt uncomfortable. Was I just imagining the threat implicit in the repetition of “wouldn’t”? He was just staring at her. She just carried on eating her quiche and salad, but in my own head I fast-forwarded to their life in Bath, aged 30, her isolated from her friends, her family, his increasing demands... Later, three women with babies bustled through the door - a lot of pram negotiation, and chair-scraping. They sat right close to my desk (I mean table), which seemed slightly aggressive in itself, though I was probably being paranoid. I think they had just had been into the nail bar next door, because one of them had the leaflet, and they were looking at it while they talked. Their main topic was another woman they all knew. “Hannah was quiet for Hannah.” “She’s usually... such a character.” (Small laugh.) “Her heart’s in the right place.” “How is her mother?” “Not long left.” “N’ah. Shame. Particularly as she’s lost just her father as well.” “God, pedicures are expensive.” How extraordinary, I thought, that they could be so callous, move so effortlessly from the death of a friend’s two parents to the price of a gel nail. And not just that. On the surface, they had appeared to be complimentary about poor Hannah - ‘“such a character”, “her heart’s in the right place” - and yet both comments were actually barbed and not really very kind at all. And if I was Hannah, deranged by grief, and I knew that these smug women with their leisurely lives and their pedicure leaflets were talking about me in that way, well, I wouldn’t like to predict the consequences. I left that cafe, and I went somewhere else the next day - Deli Boutique in Clapham, a new French-run establishment that serves crepes to school children after 3.30pm. It was quiet enough in the morning, though a woman next to me did keep talking about how “disgusting” it was that her daughter’s teacher didn’t return her emails. (The teeth-clenched force behind that most visceral of adjectives suggested a more generalised anger that could do with specialist help). Lunchtime, though, I became aware of latent violence in many of the throwaway remarks wafting over the aroma of hot cheese and ham croissant. “I’m going to have to say something. I can’t live like this.” And “It’s the groaning I can’t bear.” And: “If this job doesn’t come up trumps I’m going to slit my wrists.” Two men in jeans were standing at the counter, waiting for a takeaway chicken pie. “Who’s left of your team now Andy’s ...gone?” one of them said casually to the other. “Just me and Layla,” the second man said. The first man's mouth dropped open. “You’re all that’s left?” Left where? I mean, probably they were just talking about work, redundancies, but I didn’t like the rigid fix of the second man’s jaw. Who was Layla? Did she mind being on her own with him? What had happened to all the others? I walked home a little after that - a nice walk across the common. A man with a beard in a heavy camouflage jacket was talking loudly just ahead of me his mobile phone. “Are you still going on about the kitchen?” he was saying. He had a forthright posh accent. “Are you still complaining? What do you want now? I trust them OK?” He listened for a bit and then started really shouting. “I cannot listen to this any more. I have a troop to organise to Afghanistan. Do you really think I care about the kitchen? Just shut up. OK. SHUT UP. If you don’t shut up I’m going to come home and blow your head off. Do you hear me? Blow your head off.” Well. I scurried across the grass pretty quickly after that. I actually think he was following me because he left the path too, and I don’t know why he would have done that otherwise. I was out of breath when I reached the safety of the main road. A friend was waiting with her dog to cross at the lights. I told her what I had just overheard. I didn’t think he was a real soldier, I said. He was clearly mad. Dangerous. She looked at me and then she looked back over the common. The sun had come out, dappling through the leaves. A few ducks idly floated on the pond. “How’s the book?” she said.

Chapter One: The Old Long Since

RULES OF CIVILITY, by Amor Towles

Read the first chapter of Amor Towles' RULES OF CIVILITY.

Charles Foster

Charles Foster is a writer, barrister and tutor in Medical Law and Ethics at the University of Oxford and sits as a part-time judge in the criminal and civil courts. He read veterinary medicine and law at the University of Cambridge and has written, edited or contributed to thirty books. His three most recently published books are The Jesus Inquest (an inquiry into the historicity of the resurrection), Tracking The Ark Of The Covenant and The Selfless Gene. He writes regularly for many publications.