Related to: 'Alex Loyd'

Yellow Kite

The Memory Code

Alex Loyd
Authors:
Alex Loyd

Every one of us is the product of our past experiences. Good or bad, everything we do is informed by our memories - or more accurately, what we take away from those memories. But what if you could go back and rewrite the lessons of the past? What if you could turn a road block into a springboard? What if you could change your behaviour by changing your memories?Maybe it sounds too futuristic to be real, but it's both real and possible. Our past doesn't have to dictate our future. Losing weight, ending addiction, improving relationships, improving careers - you can really change these behaviours by altering your memories. In his groundbreaking new book The Memory Code, bestselling author Dr. Alexander Loyd teaches you how, revealing techniques he's been developing for more than 16 years.When we have a negative experience, we develop coping mechanisms to avoid that experience in the future. That can lead to behaviours like overeating, substance abuse, or poor lifestyle choices. By turning negative memories into positive ones, we can change the behaviours at the root of our problems. This process, called memory re-engineering, involves teaching our brains to re-imagine and re-code certain memories that trigger negative associations and the avoidance and coping mechanisms we've developed to deal with them. It means teaching ourselves to rethink those internal images so that instead of producing fear, anxiety and other negative emotions, they produce love, peace and positive associations.

Yellow Kite

Short Cuts To Happiness

Tal Ben-Shahar
Authors:
Tal Ben-Shahar

Even a New York Times-bestselling happiness expert can need advice!In his trailblazing Harvard courses, internationally bestselling books, and lectures and videos, positive psychologist Tal Ben-Shahar has shared his essential, scientifically backed tools for finding fulfillment the world over. But even the happiness expert needs a boost from time to time! Tal found his not in a guru or fellow psychologist, but rather in his longtime neighborhood barber, Avi-a man with a gift for making his clients look and feel great with wisdom beyond his years.Tal's visits to Avi soon grew into a friendship deeper than most. Between snips, the two men talked about everything from family and starting a business to the meaning of life and the power of music. Two years of their revelatory barbershop talk have been distilled into these gems of inspiration-perfect to give, receive, and share, even between haircuts.'A charming read to remind you that wisdom about happiness is often right around the corner.' - Adam Grant, New York Times bestselling author of Give and Take and Originals, and co-author of Option B with Sheryl Sandberg'When a happiness expert like Ben-Shahar turns to someone else for advice, you know the advice has got to be good. Short Cuts to Happiness offers accessible, universal wisdom that puts a life of meaning and fulfilment within reach and sets a very high bar for my next trip to the barber!' - Colin Beavan, author of No Impact Man and How to Be Alive'Who knew that a trip to the barber could offer the secret to a happy life? In Short Cuts to Happiness, Tal Ben-Shahar shows how powerful insights grow from simple words of wisdom and how happiness can be found in surprising places - the smell of lilies, a good laugh, or a casual chat with a barber. In these pages, the pioneer of positive psychology finds a whole new way to help readers understand what it means to live life to its fullest. Like a great haircut, this book will leave you feeling sharper, more energized, and eager to take on the world.' - Alex Palmer, New York Times-bestselling author

Hodder Paperbacks

The Healing Code

Alex Loyd, Ben Johnson
Authors:
Alex Loyd, Ben Johnson

The Healing Code is your healing kit for life - to heal the issues you know about, and the ones you don't. In 2001, while trying to cure his wife of her long term depression, Dr. Alex Loyd discovered how to activate a physical function built into the body that consistently and predictably removes the source of 95% of all illness and disease, so that the neuro-immune system takes over its job of healing whatever is wrong with the body. He also discovered that there is a Universal Healing Code that will heal most issues for most people - physical, emotional and relational, as well as enabling breakthroughs in success and well being.The Healing Code has been subjected to numerous tests which have validated its success, as do the testimonies of the thousands of people for whom it has worked. In this book you will discover for yourself The Healing Code process. It's easy to learn, can be used just about anywhere and takes only six minutes to complete. This life changing book also includes the Seven Secrets of life, health and prosperity, the 10-second Instant Impact technique for defusing everyday stress and the Heart Issues Finder - a simple test that identifies quickly your own personal source issues and imbalances.In just six minutes, lower stress, turn the immune and healing systems back on and discover the life changing effects of The Healing Code.

John Murray Learning

The Verbal Behavior Approach

Mary Lynch Barbera
Authors:
Mary Lynch Barbera

A step-by-step guide on how to help children develop language and speaking skills.The Verbal Behavior (VB) approach is a form of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA), that is based on B.F. Skinner's analysis of verbal behavior and works particularly well with children with minimal or no speech abilities. In this book Dr. Mary Lynch Barbera draws on her own experiences as a Board Certified Behavior Analyst and also as a parent of a child with autism to explain VB and how to use it.This step-by-step guide provides an abundance of information about how to help children develop better language and speaking skills, and also explains how to teach non-vocal children to use sign language. An entire chapter focuses on ways to reduce problem behavior, and there is also useful information on teaching toileting and other important self-help skills, that would benefit any child.This book will enable parents and professionals unfamiliar with the principles of ABA and VB to get started immediately using the Verbal Behavior approach to teach children with autism and related disorders.(P)2017 Hodder & Stoughton Limited

Yellow Kite

Self-Reg

Stuart Shanker
Authors:
Stuart Shanker

We are seeing a generation of children and teens with excessively high levels of stress, and, as a result, an explosion of emotional, social, learning, behavioural and physical health problems in young people today. But few parents recognise the 'hidden stressors' that their children are struggling with. Help Your Child Deal With Stress - and Thrive is a ground-breaking parenting book, where Stuart Shanker argues that by teaching children the art of self-regulation, it can transform their behaviour and help them to identify, talk about and manage their emotions. This leads to a harmonious home and children who feel nurtured and supported.Mastering the art of self-regulation can help children learn to deal with experiences, overcome frustration, pay better attention, engage better with others and enhance their learning capabilities. In turn, children will develop the confidence, along with the skills and emotional strength needed, to navigate the pressures and stresses of the modern world.Underpinned by science, Dr Shanker's techniques have had a remarkable effect on children and parents alike, and hundreds of thousands of children who have gone through the programme in Canada have shown significant improvement in literacy, numeracy and behaviour. 'In this important and timely book, Stuart Shanker encourages us to see our children in a whole new light and gives us the tools we need to help nurture our young in order that they can better manage stress, build resiliency and improve their emotional health. Today's pupils are under serious pressure to perform; by helping children recognize, identify and talk about their emotions, we can help them find balance and ultimately realise their true potential.'Sir Anthony Seldon, Vice-Chancellor of the University of Buckingham, co-founder of Action for Happiness and best-selling author'Our digital age is stressful, frantic and over-stimulating. Raising a child today requires an understanding of self-regulation. Dr. Shanker helps parents not just to understand the meaning of their child's behavior with compassion, but, just as essentially, how to calm themselves in order to better guide their children toward more positively engaged living.' Catherine Steiner-Adair, Ed. D., author of The Big Disconnect: Protecting Childhood and Family Relationships in the Digital Age'Capping a lifetime of studying and thinking about children's emotions and behavior, the brilliant Stuart Shanker presents us with this stupendous gift, a true tour-de-force, in which he dismantles and elegantly reassembles, so that the layperson can understand, one of the most complicated mechanisms of the mind: self-regulation. Parents, rejoice! Read this book and you will be able to teach your children (and yourselves!) the practical, immensely valuable, and enormously satisfying skills of self-regulation.'Edward Hallowell, MD, author of Driven to Distraction: Recognizing and Coping with Attention Deficit Disorder'Brilliant. In this illuminating and accessible breakthrough book, Stuart Shanker makes a powerful case for understanding children's behavior and misbehavior using the lens of self-regulation. I will never see children in the same way. Michael Thompson, author of Raising Cain: Protecting the Emotional Life of Boys

Nicholas Brealey International

The Cult of the Luxury Brand

Paul Husband, Radha Chadha
Authors:
Paul Husband, Radha Chadha
Sceptre

The Art of Creative Thinking

Rod Judkins
Authors:
Rod Judkins

A scuba diving company faces bankruptcy because sharks have infested the area. Solution? Open the world's first extreme diving school.The Art of Creative Thinking reveals how we can transform ourselves, our businesses and our society through a deeper understanding of human creativity. Rod Judkins, of the world-famous St Martin's College of Art, has studied successful creative thinkers from every walk of life, throughout history. Drawing on an extraordinary range of reference points - from the Dada Manifesto to Nobel Prize Winning economists, from Andy Warhol's studio to Einstein's desk - he distils a lifetime's expertise into a succinct, surprising book that will inspire you to think more confidently and creatively.You'll realise why you should be happy when your train is cancelled; meet the most successful class in educational history (in which every single student won a Nobel prize); discover why graphic nudity during public speaking can be both a hindrance and surprisingly persuasive; and learn why, in the twenty-first century, it's technically illegal to be as good as Michelangelo.Be stubborn about compromise.Plan to have more accidents.Be mature enough to be childish.Contradict yourself more often.Discover the Art of Creative Thinking. *From the publishers of the international bestseller The Art of Thinking Clearly*

Yellow Kite

Beyond Willpower

Alex Loyd
Authors:
Alex Loyd
Two Roads

Until I Say Good-Bye

Bret Witter, Susan Spencer-Wendel
Authors:
Bret Witter, Susan Spencer-Wendel

THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLERAs inspirational as Tuesdays with Morrie and The Last Lecture ... What would you do with one year to live? Susan Spencer-Wendel was determined to laugh instead of cry.In 2011, she learned she had amyotrophic lateral sclerosis disease -(ALS) - Lou Gehrig's disease - an irreversible condition that systematically destroys the nerves that power the muscles. Susan was just 44-years-old, with three young children, and she had only one year of health remaining. She decided to live that year with joy.She left her job as a journalist and spent time with her family. She built a meeting place for friends in her backyard. And she took seven trips with the seven most important people in her life. As her health declined, Susan journeyed to the Yukon, Hungary, the Bahamas, and Cyprus. She went to the beach with her sons and to Kleinfeld's bridal shop in New York City with her teenage daughter, Marina, for a glimpse of the wedding she would never attend.She also wrote this book. No longer able to walk or even lift her arms, she tapped it out letter by letter on her iPhone using only her right thumb, the last finger still working.And yet Until I Say Good-Bye is not angry or bitter. It is sad in parts - how could it not be? - but it is filled with Susan's optimism, joie de vivre and sens of humour. It is a book that, like Susan, will make everyone smile. From a hilarious family Christmas disaster to the decrepit monastery in eastern Cyprus where she rediscovered her heritage, Until I Say Good-Bye is Susan Spencer-Wendel's unforgettable gift to her loved ones and to us: a record of their final experiences together and a reminder that every day is better when it is lived with joy. Susan died in 2014 with a life lived to the full.

Two Roads

The Still Point of the Turning World

Emily Rapp
Authors:
Emily Rapp
Hodder & Stoughton

The Blood Sugar Solution

Mark Hyman
Authors:
Mark Hyman
Hodder Paperbacks

Foreign Influence

Brad Thor
Authors:
Brad Thor
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Ascent of Media

Roger Parry
Authors:
Roger Parry
Hodder Paperbacks

The Immortality Code

Dermot O'connor
Authors:
Dermot O'connor
Hodder Paperbacks

The Mozart Effect

Don Campbell
Authors:
Don Campbell
Chapter One

XO by Jeffery Deaver

Read the first chapter of Jeffery Deaver's newest Kathryn Dance thriller, XO.

Extract

GOLD by Chris Cleave

Read an excerpt of Chris Cleave's GOLD.

An excerpt from the Pacific Journal of Adam Ewing

CLOUD ATLAS, by David Mitchell

Read an excerpt of David Mitchell's international bestseller, CLOUD ATLAS, now also releasing as a film.

Chapter One

THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED, by Clare Morrall

Read the first chapter of Sceptre author Clare Morrall's THE MAN WHO DISAPPEARED.

My South Africa

Deon Meyer on the new South Africa

If books are windows on the world,1 crime fiction mostly provides a view of the underbelly and back alleys of cities and countries. This is my only genuine regret writing as an author in this genre. Because the real South Africa, the one that I love so passionately, is very different from the narrow and dim view my books probably allow. It is also quite unlike the one you see in those pessimistic fifteen second television news reports in the UK, Europe or Australia. So let me try and set the record straight. My country is breathtakingly beautiful – from the lush, sub-tropical east coast of Kwazulu-Natal, to the serene semi-desert stretching along the Atlantic in the west (which blooms in inde- scribable colour and splendour in Spring). In between, there’s the magnificence of the Lowveld, the Bushveld, the Highveld, the towering Drakensberg mountains, the aching vastness of the Karoo and the dense silence of the Knysna forests . . . Diversity is everywhere. In the climate (mostly perfect sunshine and balmy weather, but we have extremes too, summer highs of more than 50°C in Upington, and winter lows of -15°C in Sutherland – both in the same Northern Cape province), and in the cities (Durban is an intoxicating fusion of Zulu, Indian and British colonial cultures, Cape Town is a heady mix of Malay, Dutch-Afrikaans and Xhosa, Johannesburg is . . . well, modern African-cosmopolitan, utterly unique, and always exciting). The biodiversity of South Africa is truly astonishing. “With a land surface area of 1.2 million square kilometres representing just 1% of the earth’s total land surface, South Africa boasts six biospheres, and contains almost 10% of the world’s total known bird, fish and plant species, and over 6% of the world’s mammal and reptile species.”2 Of course we are also world-famous for our huge collection of wildlife regions and game parks – both public and private – encompassing every possible landscape from deserts to forests, mountains to coast, teeming with wildlife species, including Africa’s Big Five: Leopard, Lion, Buffalo, Elephant and Rhinoceros.3 But most of all, the diversity is in the people who constitute the Rainbow Nation. Our black ethnic groups include the Zulu, Xhosa, Basotho, Bapedi, Venda, Tswana, Tsonga, Swazi and Ndebele.The so-called ‘coloured’ (no, it’s not a derogatory term over here) population is mainly concentrated in the Western Cape region, and come from a combination of ethnic backgrounds including Malay, White, Khoi, San, and Griqua. White South Africans are descendants of Dutch, German, French Huguenots, English and other European and Jewish settlers. And our Indian population came to South Africa as indentured labourers to work in the sugar plantations in the British colony of Natal in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The population of more than fifty million people is made up of African (40.2 million, or 79.5%),White (4.6 million, or 9.0%), Coloured (4.5 million, or 9.0%), and Indian/Asian (1.3 million, or 2.5%). And, having travelled most of the world, I can confidently say, you won’t find friendlier, more hospitable and accommodating people anywhere, irrespective of their race, culture, language or creed. We have nine provinces (Eastern Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu- Natal, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape, Limpopo, North West, Free State, and Western Cape) and eleven official languages: Afrikaans (13%), English (8%), isiNdebele (1.6%), isiXhosa (18%), isiZulu (24%), Sesotho sa Leboa (9%), Sesotho (8%), Setswana (8%), siSwati (3%),Tshivenda (2%), and Xitsonga (4%).4 Throw all of this together in a democracy not quite twenty years old (a tempestuous teenager, if ever there was one), and you get an effervescent, energetic, dynamic, and often a little chaotic, melting pot – of cultures, people, views, politics, opinions, and circumstance. After the tragedy and oppression of Apartheid, we are still very much coming to terms with – and are sometimes a little overwhelmed by – all the facets of the freedom-diamond. Which means that we argue incessantly, shout, point fingers, blame, accuse, denounce, complain, and criticize, mostly loudly and publicly, like all enthusiastic democrats should. But when our beloved Bafana-Bafana (the national football team), Springboks (our twice World Cup-winning rugby team) or Proteas (the cricket guys) walk onto the field, we stand united, shoulder to shoulder. And mostly, in our day-to-day-lives, we get along rather well. We increasingly study and work and live and love and socialise together, in great harmony. Of course, we have our problems. Poverty is the major one. “There is a consensus amongst most economic and political analysts that approximately 40% of South Africans are living in poverty – with the poorest 15% in a desperate struggle to survive.” However, we are making steady progress. The percentage of the South African population with access to clean drinking water has increased from 62% in 1994, to 93% in 2011. Access to electricity has increased from 34% in 1994, to 84% in 2011.5 In 2010, 13.5 million South Africans benefited from access to social grants, 8.5 million of whom were children, 3.5 million pensioners and 1.5 million people with disabilities. In 1994, only 2.5 million people had access to social grants, the majority of whom were pensioners. And since 1994, 435 houses have been built every day for the poor.6 And you might have heard about our other challenge – South Africa has a bit of a reputation when it comes to crime. I am most definitely going out on a limb here, but having studied the statistics, and looked at the (often unfair) comparisons over the past five years, I honestly believe we don’t quite deserve it. “. . . in relation to the overall risk of victimisation, South Africans are not much more likely to become victims of crime than people in other parts of the world,” Anthony Altbeker recently wrote in a carefully considered and exhaustively researched contribution to the marvellous Opinion Pieces by South African Thought Leaders.7 To put the matter into further perspective: In the two years leading up to the FIFA World Cup held in South Africa in 2010, almost every British, French and German journalist who interviewed me, asked the same question, more or less: “How big a slaughter is it going to be for fans attending the games?” Some were downright accusatory: “How dare you host this magnificent event in such a hazardous country?” A British tabloid even predicted a ‘machete race war’ waiting for visitors.8 And how many soccer fans died during the tournament? None.9 Furthermore, the attendees who were affected by crime-related incidents represented a very meagre 0.009% of the fans. That is far, far less than, for instance, the crime rate in Wales. When World Cup tourists were asked if they would consider visiting South Africa again, 96% said ‘yes’. As a matter of fact, if you are a tourist from the Northern Hemisphere visiting my beautiful country, your chances of becoming a victim of violent crime is less than 0.67%.10 (Compare this to the fact that “the 2011 British Behaviour Abroad Report published by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) noted that the death rate (including murder and natural causes) of Britons in Thailand was forty-one per 100,000 tourists and for those visiting Germany was twenty-four. Tourists from the UK are far safer visiting South Africa”11 – with just 14.6 per 100,000.12) South Africa’s murder rate dropped by 6.5% in 2010-2011, attempted murder by 12.2%, robbery with aggravating circumstances was down by 12%, and house robberies by 10%.13 Our police services are slowly but surely turning the tide. We struggle with inadequate service delivery, our politicians don’t always live up to our expectations, and our unemployment rate is too high. But our economy is robust, and easily out-performs first-world countries like Greece (no surprise there), Italy, and Spain. South African Tax Revenue has increased from R100 billion in 1994 to R640 billion in 2010. Our debt to GDP ratio is 32% (USA 100%, Japan 200%, UK 90%). (The World Bank recommends a ratio of 60%.) And we are ranked first out of 142 countries in respect of regulation of security exchanges by the World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report 2011/12.14 According to the Open Budget Index, South Africa has the most transparent budget in the world. We are the only African country that is a member of the G20. In the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Survey of Democratic Freedom, South Africa ranks 31st out of 184 countries. And according to the Global Competitiveness Report 2010/11, South Africa has the 34th most efficient government out of the 139 countries ranked.15 The number of tourists visiting South Africa has grown from 3.9 million in 1994 to 11.3 million in 2010. South Africa is ranked among the top five countries in the world in respect of tourism growth (growing at three times the global average).16 I could go on. South Africa’s learner-to-teacher ratio improved from 1:50 in 1994 to 1:31 in 2010. According to the Global Competitiveness Report 2011/12, South Africa is ranked 13th out of 142 countries for its quality of management schools. 61% of South African primary school children and 30% of high school children receive free meals as part of the school feeding scheme.17 But none of these facts and figures, as inspiring as they are, will reveal the real reason why I am so unwaveringly optimistic about my country’s future. It is one of the major reasons for the peaceful transition miracle of 1994, it is something woven into the texture of everyday South African life, hidden from the fleeting eyes of foreign journalists on a flying visit, mostly talking only to important folks: The goodwill of ordinary people. Every day, in cities, towns, and tiny villages, small acts of kindness happen between human beings. Individuals who extend a helping hand across racial, cultural, political and linguistic divides, who extend friendship and kindness and empathy. I have been witnessing this for more than forty years, and I absolutely believe it is this goodwill that will carry us through, no matter how challenging the future may be. 1 “Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. They are engines of change, windows on the world, lighthouses erected in the sea of time.” - Barbara W. Tuchman, American popular historian and author, 1912-1989. 2 http://www.bcb.uwc.ac.za/envfacts/facts/biosa.htm 3 http://www.sa-venues.com/game_lodges_nationwide_south_afr.htm
 4 http://www.safrica.info/about/facts.htm (percentages rounded off)
 5 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/fast_facts_and_quick_stats/index.html
 6 Ibid. 7 Penguin, 2011. p. 47.
 8 http://www.dailystar.co.uk/posts/view/129402/WORLD-CUP-MACHETE- THREAT/
 9 http://www.truecrimexpo.co.za/
 10 http://www.info.gov.za/issues/crime/crime_aprsept_ppt.pdf
 11 http://www.issafrica.org/iss_today.php?ID=1394
 12 Ibid.
 13 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/crime/crime_statistics_show_drop_in_ murder_rate.html
 14 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/fast_facts_and_quick_stats/index.html 15 Ibid.
 16 Ibid. 17 Ibid.