Related to: 'Matt Hilton'

Hodder & Stoughton

Shell Game

Sara Paretsky
Authors:
Sara Paretsky

A SUNDAY TIMES CRIME BOOK OF THE MONTH PICKThe new V.I. Warshawski novel from the New York Times bestselling author pits acclaimed detective V.I. Warshawski against some of today's most powerful figures.'The 19th Warshawski novel is also a panoramic vision of Chicago at a time when the city is so polarised that decent people don't know who to trust' The Sunday Times'Paretsky is a genius' Lee ChildLegendary sleuth V.I. Warshawski returns to the Windy City to save an old friend's nephew from a murder arrest. The case involves a stolen artifact that could implicate a shadowy network of international criminals. As V.I. investigates, the detective soon finds herself tangling with the Russian mob, ISIS backers, and a shady network of stock scams and stolen art that stretches from Chicago to the East Indies and the Middle East. In Shell Game, nothing and no one are what they seem, except for the detective herself, who loses sleep, money, and blood, but remains indomitable in her quest for justice.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

TED Talks

Chris Anderson
Authors:
Chris Anderson
Hodder Paperbacks

The Devil's Anvil

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

First Response

Stephen Leather
Authors:
Stephen Leather

From the bestselling author of the Spider Shepherd and Jack Nightingale series comes First Response, the utterly addictive new thriller by Stephen Leather. London is under siege. Nine men in suicide vests primed to explode hold hostages in nine different locations around the city, and are ready to die for their cause.Their mission: to force the government to release jihadist prisoners from Belmarsh Prison.Their deadline: 6 p.m. Today. But the bombers are cleanskins, terrorists with no obvious link to any group, and who do not appear on any anti-terror watch list. What has brought them together on this one day to act in this way? Mo Kamran is the Superintendent in charge of the Special Crime and Operations branch of the Met. As the disaster unfolds and the SAS, armed police, and other emergency services rush to the scenes, he is tasked with preventing the biggest terrorist outrage the capital has ever known.But nothing is what it seems. And only Kamran has the big picture. Will anyone believe him?A chillingly plausible and pulse-pounding depiction of how London might be held to ransom in a concerted terrorist attack: this is thriller writing at its very best.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Lawless Kind

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

Red Stripes - A Joe Hunter Short Story

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

Stephan, a young man from a rich family in Miami, and his girlfriend Wendy are kidnapped and held in Jamaica. After liberating them with his partner Rink, Joe realises on his return to Tampa, that someone from the kidnapping gang is after him. His investigations lead him to the man responsible for masterminding the kidnap and extortion.

Hodder & Stoughton

Rules of Honour

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

The Prophet

Michael Koryta
Authors:
Michael Koryta
Hodder & Stoughton

Dead Fall - A Joe Hunter Short Story

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

7 Days

Deon Meyer
Authors:
Deon Meyer
Hodder & Stoughton

No Going Back

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

Joe Hunter: Six of the Best - Ebook

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

Six of the Best: Joe Hunter has always hated bullies. And Tony Largo is a bully who has picked the wrong target when he assaults a war veteran.Homecoming: Joe promises a grieving mother he'll bring her son home, whatever it takes.Sand Dance: When a hot-dog seller gets mugged, Joe finds a sneaky way of getting revenge.UV Ray: Joe and his best buddy Rink don't play by the rules when they take on a child abuser at a bowling alley.Instant Justice: Carl Riley didn't sound like the name of a beast. But he was a man who preyed on the faceless young who worked the neon strip. Until he came face to face with Joe.The Other Side of the Street: Joe plays the Good Samaritan.

Hodder & Stoughton

Dead Men's Harvest

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

Blood and Ashes

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

Brooke Reynolds died in a car crash. Tragic accident, the police say. But her father Don Hoffman knows otherwise. And he wants Joe Hunter to find the men responsible. Joe is not convinced - until he is attacked by two troublemakers, and Don's other daughter is also threatened. Looks like more than coincidence. And sure enough, the entire family is soon under siege with only Joe to protect them. The ensuing blood bath is the beginning of a trail of death that leads right to the heart of a racist conspiracy. White supremacists want to hold the government to ransom; and they have got hold of a dirty bomb to add weight to their case. Joe is on countdown: can he stop the plotters before they reduce the free world to ashes?

Hodder Paperbacks

Cut and Run

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

Joe Hunter vs Luke Rickard, a killer who has stolen his identity and committed a vicious double murder. His motive? Revenge. His method? A blade. His mission? Kill anyone Hunter holds dear.It is a deadly duel of wits that takes Hunter from the streets of Miami to the squalid barrios of Colombia to the jungle hideaway of a drug baron. And brings him face to face with his past. Revenge is a dish best served cold and Joe needs a cool head if Rickard is not to cut and run.CUT AND RUN - the fourth high-octane adventure for Joe Hunter, the man whose mission is to rid the world of bad guys.

Hodder & Stoughton

Slash and Burn

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

Joe Hunter is enjoying some much needed r&r when a young woman approaches him to help find her missing sister Imogen. Kate Piers knows about Joe from her dead brother Jake, Hunter's former comrade in arms, and for that reason alone he feels obliged to help. The fact that Kate is very attractive doesn't hurt.Together they go to Imogen's Kentucky home where they are immediately attacked by a bunch of thugs, acting on behalf of local businessman Robert Huffman. Huffman outwardly respectable but the psychotic twins he uses as his enforcers give the game away: he has links to organised crime and a deadly reputation with a blade. Huffman is also looking for Imogen, and kidnaps Kate to act as bait. Looks like Joe is in trouble again . . .

Hodder & Stoughton

Judgement and Wrath

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton
Hodder & Stoughton

Dead Men's Dust

Matt Hilton
Authors:
Matt Hilton

'Some may call me a vigilante. I think I've just got problems to fix.'Right now, Joe Hunter's big problem is a missing little brother, last seen fleeing the site of a gruesome killing. Hunter needs the help of an old army buddy, a whole lot of hardware and a trip to Little Rock, Arkansas, to fix this particular problem.A brutal encounter with some very nasty criminals leaves Hunter fighting for his life. And that's before he comes up against America's most feared serial killer, 'The Harvestman', and his grisly souvenirs of death.But blood is thicker than water. And a lot of blood will be spilt . . .DEAD MEN'S DUST introduces Joe Hunter, an all action hero with a strong moral code. Like the gunslingers of the Wild West, Hunter is not afraid to use his weapons and his fists - but only to save the victims from the bad guys.

Stephen Leather

Stephen Leather is one of the UK's most successful thriller writers, an ebook and Sunday Times bestseller and author of the critically acclaimed Dan 'Spider' Shepherd series and the Jack Nightingale supernatural detective novels. Before becoming a novelist he was a journalist for more than ten years on newspapers such as The Times, the Daily Mirror, the Glasgow Herald, the Daily Mail and the South China Morning Post in Hong Kong. He is one of the country's most successful ebook authors and his titles have topped the Amazon Kindle charts in the UK and the US. His bestsellers have been translated into fifteen languages and he has also written for television.You can learn more from Stephen's website, www.stephenleather.com, find him on Facebook, and follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/stephenleather.Stephen also has a website for his Spider Shepherd series, www.danspidershepherd.com, and for his Jack Nightingale series, www.jacknightingale.com.

Author Stephen Leather discusses the importance of character names.

What's In A Name?

What’s in a name? Well, when it comes to a character in a novel, pretty much everything.Choosing the right name can mean that a reader instantly identifies with a character and cares about what happens to them. Choosing the wrong name can put a reader off before you’ve even got started on the story. So making the right choice is crucial.I have created two long-running characters: undercover cop Dan “Spider” Shepherd and supernatural detective Jack Nightingale. And I went to a lot of trouble choosing both of those names.With action heroes, a single syllable first name followed by a double syllable family name seems to work best – think Jack Reacher (created by Lee Child) or Joe Hunter (created by Matt Hilton). Both Reacher and Hunter are great surnames for loners who are happy to kill at will, but I chose Shepherd because the name evokes a feeling of security and safety – a shepherd takes care of his flock, after all. Dan is simple and uncomplicated and goes well with Shepherd. Dan Shepherd has the sound of a hero, whereas Reginald Shepherd doesn’t. With Jack Nightingale, I again wanted a simple and direct first name. Jack works as a heroic name. As does Mick. Bob does as well, but Robert not so much. Then for the family name I wanted something with several syllables, but a name that was very distinctive. I also wanted the name to be soft, because Jack Nightingale often finds himself in danger and out of his depth. Nightingales are sweet and innocent, and although my character has his dark side, the name does emphasise his vulnerability.Every name in a book matters and has to be right. So how do I come up with names for the dozens of minor characters that populate a novel? One thing I do is to collect names. If a fan goes to the trouble of writing to me, I’ll often jot the name down in my Filofax. I do the same for readers who have gone to the trouble of writing a flattering review of one of my books. Then when I find myself short of a name I can open the Filofax and pick a suitable one from the list.I tend to write with the television on – for some reason I find it impossible to be creative in silence – and if I still need a name I will often look at the credits of a TV show or movie as they scroll by. I can take the first name of an actor and the family name of a producer and I have a new character!And I can let you into a writer’s trick – you never want to have two characters whose surnames are about the same length and start with the same letter. When you’re reading, your brain take short cuts and often recognises a name by its length and starting letter. So as you scan a page, Mackenzie can look like Mitchell which can look like Macdonald. Ditto John, Jack, Jake and Jane. That can cause all sorts of confusion, so before I send my finished novel to my publishers I always make a list of the characters in it and make sure that no two names have the same first letter! What’s in a name? Well, when it comes to a character in a novel, pretty much everything. Choosing the right name can mean that a reader instantly identifies with a character and cares about what happens to them. Choosing the wrong name can put a reader off before you’ve even got started on the story. So making the right choice is crucial. I have created two long-running characters: undercover cop Dan “Spider” Shepherd and supernatural detective Jack Nightingale. And I went to a lot of trouble choosing both of those names. With action heroes, a single syllable first name followed by a double syllable family name seems to work best – think Jack Reacher (created by Lee Child) or Joe Hunter (created by Matt Hilton). Both Reacher and Hunter are great surnames for loners who are happy to kill at will, but I chose Shepherd because the name evokes a feeling of security and safety – a shepherd takes care of his flock, after all. Dan is simple and uncomplicated and goes well with Shepherd. Dan Shepherd has the sound of a hero, whereas Reginald Shepherd doesn’t. With Jack Nightingale, I again wanted a simple and direct first name. Jack works as a heroic name. As does Mick. Bob does as well, but Robert not so much. Then for the family name I wanted something with several syllables, but a name that was very distinctive. I also wanted the name to be soft, because Jack Nightingale often finds himself in danger and out of his depth. Nightingales are sweet and innocent, and although my character has his dark side, the name does emphasise his vulnerability. Every name in a book matters and has to be right. So how do I come up with names for the dozens of minor characters that populate a novel? One thing I do is to collect names. If a fan goes to the trouble of writing to me, I’ll often jot the name down in my Filofax. I do the same for readers who have gone to the trouble of writing a flattering review of one of my books. Then when I find myself short of a name I can open the Filofax and pick a suitable one from the list. I tend to write with the television on – for some reason I find it impossible to be creative in silence – and if I still need a name I will often look at the credits of a TV show or movie as they scroll by. I can take the first name of an actor and the family name of a producer and I have a new character! And I can let you into a writer’s trick – you never want to have two characters whose surnames are about the same length and start with the same letter. When you’re reading, your brain take short cuts and often recognises a name by its length and starting letter. So as you scan a page, Mackenzie can look like Mitchell which can look like Macdonald. Ditto John, Jack, Jake and Jane. That can cause all sorts of confusion, so before I send my finished novel to my publishers I always make a list of the characters in it and make sure that no two names have the same first letter!