Related to: 'Eric Schmidt'

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Counter Mentor Leadership

Kelly Riggs, Robby Riggs
Authors:
Kelly Riggs, Robby Riggs

For the first time in history, the younger generation has something more to offer an employer than enthusiasm. In the past, a new employee was dependent upon years of service, but now digital technology and social media have exploded into the workplace. The younger generation possess the knowledge and the practical experience to navigate the rapidly evolving landscape of social media and digital tools.Unfortunately, most companies, led primarily by old-school Baby Boomers, have tenaciously clung to the old-world order. The reasons are as varied as the companies, but they are all, sadly, proving to be lethal. The technology revolution has impacted more than the new generation of employees. It has created a completely new set of leadership challenges - time compression, complexity, pace of change, and increasing levels of distraction - all created by the tether of technology. The CounterMentor is the new leader who taps into the wealth of knowledge available from the younger generations and lets their company "grow from below." Counter Mentor Leadership will:- Show you how to discuss new workplace dynamics - Explain how to attract and retain the Millennial workforce- Explore the new challenges of leadership inherent with the explosion of technology - time compression, distractions, complexity, pace of change- Detail the CounterMentor leadership model and prescribe specific tactics and techniques for addressing both the old and new leadership issues

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Coaching for Performance

John Whitmore
Authors:
John Whitmore
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Suddenly in Charge

Roberta Chinsky Matuson
Authors:
Roberta Chinsky Matuson

As companies reorganize and reengineer, people are finding themselves tossed into management every day with little to no training or preparation. Literally two books in one, Suddenly in Charge provides all of the tools necessary to be successful at managing up and down the line of any organization. In addition to updates to all chapters, this revised and updated edition features 7 new chapters (3 chapters will be deleted) aligned to modern approaches to management. New topics include: executive presence, working with a coach or mentor, employee retention, creating purpose, the multi-generational workforce and more.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing US

SuperHubs

Sandra Navidi
Authors:
Sandra Navidi
Hodder & Stoughton

Leading

Alex Ferguson
Authors:
Alex Ferguson

'One of the World's all-time great leaders'Professor Anita Elberse, Harvard Business SchoolWhat does it take to lead a team to world-class success over a sustained period of time?Sir Alex Ferguson is one of the few leaders who truly knows. In his 38 years in management, Sir Alex won an astonishing 49 trophies and helped grow Manchester United into one of the biggest commercial brands in the world. In this inspirational and straight-talking book, Sir Alex reveals the secrets behind his record-breaking career.LEADING is structured around the key skills that Sir Alex values most highly. It includes subjects we immediately associate with his managerial style: Discipline, Control, Teamwork and Motivation. But it also addresses subjects that are less obvious but no less important when seeking success: Delegation, Data Analysis and Dealing with Failure.Written with the investor Sir Michael Moritz, a longstanding friend of Sir Alex, LEADING is packed with insight, wisdom, humour and honesty. The individual stories inevitably concern themselves with football, and the phenomenal success that came along the way, but the lessons can be applied by anyone. Whether you run a business, teach in a classroom, or work in a small team, LEADING will help you become a better leader.

John Murray

Work Rules!

Laszlo Bock
Authors:
Laszlo Bock
Sceptre

Becoming Steve Jobs

Brent Schlender, Rick Tetzeli
Authors:
Brent Schlender, Rick Tetzeli

THE SUNDAY TIMES AND #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER - with a new foreword by Silicon Valley legend Marc Andreessen.'For my money, a better book about Jobs than Walter Isaacson's biography' New Yorker'A fascinating reinterpretation of the Steve Jobs story' Sunday TimesWe all think we know who Steve Jobs was, what made him tick, and what made him succeed. Yet the single most important question about him has never been answered. The young, impulsive, egotistical genius was ousted in the mid-80s from the company he founded, exiled from his own kingdom and cast into the wilderness. Yet he returned a decade later to transform the ailing Apple into the most successful company the world had ever seen. How did this reckless upstart transform himself into a visionary business leader? The first comprehensive study of Jobs' career following his dismissal from Apple, written with unparalleled access and insight, BECOMING STEVE JOBS offers a startling new portrait of the most important business figure in modern history. The most intimate biography yet of Jobs, written by the journalist who knew him better than any other, BECOMING STEVE JOBS draws on recently discovered interviews that have never before seen the light of day, and answers for the first time the most pressing questions about what made this legendary business leader such a success.'Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli render a spectacular service with this book, giving fresh perspective onSteve Jobs' journey from inspiring but immature entrepreneur into an inspired and mature company-builder. Most important, they capture Jobs' resilience, his refusal to capitulate, his restless drive to stay in the game, his voracious appetite to learn-this, far more than genius, is what made him great.Becoming Steve Jobs gets the focus precisely right: not as a success story, but as a growth story. Riveting, insightful, uplifting-read it and learn!' Jim Collins, author of Good to Great'BECOMING STEVE JOBS is fantastic. After working with Steve for over 25 years, I feel this book captures with great insight the growth and complexity of a truly extraordinary person. I hope that it will be recognized as the definitive history.' Ed Catmull, President, Pixar and Disney Animation

Sceptre

Wealth Secrets of the 1%

Sam Wilkin
Authors:
Sam Wilkin
John Murray

Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo!

Nicholas Carlson
Authors:
Nicholas Carlson

From her controversial rise and fall from power at Google, to her dramatic reshaping of Yahoo's work culture, people are obsessed with, and polarised by, Marissa Mayer's every move. She is full of fascinating contradictions: a feminist who rejects feminism, a charmer in front of a crowd who can't hold eye contact in one-on-ones and a geek who is Oscar de la Renta's best customer. Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo! tells her story. Back in the 1990s, Yahoo was the internet. It was also a $120 billion company. But just as quickly as it became the world's most famous internet company, it crashed to earth during the dotcom bust. And yet, Yahoo is still here, with nearly a billion people visiting it each month. Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo! tells the fly-on-the-wall story of Yahoo's history for the first time, getting inside the board room as executives make genius calls and massive blunders.Dan Loeb, a tough-talking hedge fund manager, set his sights on Yahoo in 2011. He grew up idolising the corporate raiders of the 1980s, building a career being more vicious than any of them. Without Loeb's initiative, Marissa Mayer would never have been given her chance to save the company. This book tells the tale of how Dan Loeb spotted the real problem inside Yahoo - its awful board - and tore it apart, getting two CEOs fired in the process.When Marissa Mayer first started at Yahoo in 2012, the car parks would empty every week by 4.00 p.m. on Thursday. Over the next two years she made plenty of mistakes, but she learned from them. Now Yahoo's culture is vibrant and users are coming back. In Marissa Mayer and the Fight to Save Yahoo! Nicholas Carlson also explores what may be the internet's first real turnaround.

John Murray

How Google Works

Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg
Authors:
Eric Schmidt, Jonathan Rosenberg
John Murray

The New Digital Age

Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen
Authors:
Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen

'This is the most important - and fascinating - book yet written about how the digital age will affect our world' Walter Isaacson, author of Steve JobsFrom two leading thinkers, the widely anticipated book that describes a new, hugely connected world of the future, full of challenges and benefits which are ours to meet and harness. The New Digital Age is the product of an unparalleled collaboration: full of the brilliant insights of one of Silicon Valley's great innovators - what Bill Gates was to Microsoft and Steve Jobs was to Apple, Schmidt (along with Larry Page and Sergey Brin) was to Google - and the Director of Google Ideas, Jared Cohen, formerly an advisor to both Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. Never before has the future been so vividly and transparently imagined. From technologies that will change lives (information systems that greatly increase productivity, safety and our quality of life, thought-controlled motion technology that can revolutionise medical procedures, and near-perfect translation technology that allows us to have more diversified interactions) to our most important future considerations (curating our online identity and fighting those who would do harm with it) to the widespread political change that will transform the globe (through transformations in conflict, increasingly active and global citizenries, a new wave of cyber-terrorism and states operating simultaneously in the physical and virtual realms) to the ever present threats to our privacy and security, Schmidt and Cohen outline in great detail and scope all the promise and peril awaiting us in the coming decades. A breakthrough book - pragmatic, inspirational and totally fascinating. Whether a government, a business or an individual, we must understand technology if we want to understand the future.'A brilliant guidebook for the next century . . . Schmidt and Cohen offer a dazzling glimpse into how the new digital revolution is changing our lives' Richard Branson

Sceptre

Hatching Twitter

Nick Bilton
Authors:
Nick Bilton

New York Times BestsellerWall Street Journal Business BestsellerEvening Standard pick Favourite Books of 2013, Sunday Business PostTHE ULTIMATE 21ST CENTURY BUSINESS STORYEv told Jack he had to 'chill out' with the deluge of media he was doing. 'It's bad for the company,' Ev said. 'It's sending the wrong message.' Biz sat between them, watching like a spectator at a tennis match.'But I invented Twitter,' Jack said.'No, you didn't invent Twitter,' Ev replied. 'I didn't invent Twitter either. Neither did Biz. People don't invent things on the Internet. They simply expand on an idea that already exsists.'Since 2006, Twitter has grown from the accidental side project of a failing internet start-up, to a global icon that by 2013 had become an $11.5bn business. But the full story of Twitter's hatching has never been told before.In his revelatory new book, New York Times journalist Nick Bilton takes readers behind the scenes of Twitter as it grew at exponential speeds, and inside the heads of the four hackers who created it: ambitious millionaire Evan Williams; tattooed mastermind Jack Dorsey; joker and diplomat Biz Stone; and Noah Glass, the shy but energetic geek who invested his whole life in Twitter, only to be kicked out and expunged from the company's official history.Combining unprecedented access with exhaustive investigative reporting, and drawing on hundreds of sources, documents and internal e-mails, HATCHING TWITTER is a blistering drama of betrayed friendships and high-stakes power struggles. A business story like no other, it will shock, expose and inspire.

Teach Yourself

SEO And Search Marketing In A Week

Nick Smith
Authors:
Nick Smith
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Search

John Battelle
Authors:
John Battelle

This updated edition of the bestselling and critically acclaimed book on the rise of Google and the 'search industry" contains a major new Afterword from John Battelle. The rise of Google is one of the most amazing stories of our time. Google's enormous impact straddles the worlds of technology, marketing, finance, media, culture, dating, job hunting, and just about every other sphere of human interest. And no one is better qualified to explain this entire phenomenon than John Battelle, the acclaimed Silicon Valley journalist who co-founded "Wired" and founded "The Industry Standard". Much more than just a business book, this explains how the search industry is changing the way we live in profound and unpredictable ways. "The Search" contains exclusive interviews with some of the biggest names at the top companies including Google founders Larry Page and Sergey Brin. Google is the No. 1 search engine and is now a recognised word in its own right - they receive over 200 million search requests every day and it is estimated that over 80 per cent of webusers turn to Google first.

JOHN MURRAY TO PUBLISH MUCH ANTICIPATED BIOGRAPHY OF YAHOO CEO MARISSA MEYER

Roland Philipps acquired the Commonwealth Rights working in conjunction with John Brodie of Grand Central Publishing, a division of Hachette Book Group USA, who acquired World rights. Carlson’s widely-read, much discussed profile of Marissa Mayer was published to an overwhelming response from the media and readers, with over one million page views. Carlson is now crafting an inside account of her transformation of Yahoo: just as Michael Lewis’s bestselling THE NEW, NEW THING captured what Silicon Valley was really like Web 1.0, Carlson’s book will depict what it takes for an established tech company to stay relevant and what it takes for someone like Mayer to reach the brass ring in today’s incredibly competitive business and tech community. Looking at Meyer’s rise to power, Carlson’s book will examine how to get ahead in an environment where the brightest and best become overnight billionaires. In addition to Yahoo’s 38-year-old CEO, hedge fund manager Daniel Loeb, Tumblr co-founder David Karp and Alibaba Group chairman Jack Ma will also appear in the book. Of the acquisition, Roland Philipps said, “Marissa Mayer is a fascinating figure – very early into Google, and designer of their homepage, then a surprise announcement to take over at Yahoo, where she has in her first year already started to turn the company back into the giant it once was. Nicholas Carlson is a fine researcher and writer and we will have here a biography that provides a fascinating insight into the whole world of tech companies.” Said Carlson, “I’ve wanted to write a book for a long time. But I only wanted to write a book that would allow me to tell a thrilling story. Also, it had to cover people, companies, and themes that lots of people care about. Obviously, a book about the dramatic events at Yahoo over the past two years meets those requirements exactly.” Acquisition of Carlson’s book adds to John Murray’s growing list of titles based around international business, and global issues and current affairs, following the success of bestseller THE NEW DIGITAL AGE by Google’s Eric Schmidt and Jared Cohen and BIG DATA by Viktor Mayer-Schönberger and Kenneth Cukier, currently shortlisted for the FT Goldman Sachs Business Book of the Year. For further information please contact Rosie Gailer: 020 7873 6452 or rosie.gailer@hodder.co.uk

Hodder & Stoughton to publish new book from Sir Alex Ferguson this autumn.

Leading by Alex Ferguson

Hodder & Stoughton have acquired an inspirational new book about leadership from the most successful British football manager of all time - Sir Alex Ferguson.

Wikipedia

Wikipedia

Eric Emerson Schmidt (born April 27, 1955) is an American software engineer, businessman and the executive chairman of Google. From 2001 to 2011, he served as the chief executive of Google. Additionally, Schmidt was a member on the board of directors for Apple Inc. and sat on the boards of trustees for both Carnegie Mellon University and Princeton University.

My South Africa

Deon Meyer on the new South Africa

If books are windows on the world,1 crime fiction mostly provides a view of the underbelly and back alleys of cities and countries. This is my only genuine regret writing as an author in this genre. Because the real South Africa, the one that I love so passionately, is very different from the narrow and dim view my books probably allow. It is also quite unlike the one you see in those pessimistic fifteen second television news reports in the UK, Europe or Australia. So let me try and set the record straight. My country is breathtakingly beautiful – from the lush, sub-tropical east coast of Kwazulu-Natal, to the serene semi-desert stretching along the Atlantic in the west (which blooms in inde- scribable colour and splendour in Spring). In between, there’s the magnificence of the Lowveld, the Bushveld, the Highveld, the towering Drakensberg mountains, the aching vastness of the Karoo and the dense silence of the Knysna forests . . . Diversity is everywhere. In the climate (mostly perfect sunshine and balmy weather, but we have extremes too, summer highs of more than 50°C in Upington, and winter lows of -15°C in Sutherland – both in the same Northern Cape province), and in the cities (Durban is an intoxicating fusion of Zulu, Indian and British colonial cultures, Cape Town is a heady mix of Malay, Dutch-Afrikaans and Xhosa, Johannesburg is . . . well, modern African-cosmopolitan, utterly unique, and always exciting). The biodiversity of South Africa is truly astonishing. “With a land surface area of 1.2 million square kilometres representing just 1% of the earth’s total land surface, South Africa boasts six biospheres, and contains almost 10% of the world’s total known bird, fish and plant species, and over 6% of the world’s mammal and reptile species.”2 Of course we are also world-famous for our huge collection of wildlife regions and game parks – both public and private – encompassing every possible landscape from deserts to forests, mountains to coast, teeming with wildlife species, including Africa’s Big Five: Leopard, Lion, Buffalo, Elephant and Rhinoceros.3 But most of all, the diversity is in the people who constitute the Rainbow Nation. Our black ethnic groups include the Zulu, Xhosa, Basotho, Bapedi, Venda, Tswana, Tsonga, Swazi and Ndebele.The so-called ‘coloured’ (no, it’s not a derogatory term over here) population is mainly concentrated in the Western Cape region, and come from a combination of ethnic backgrounds including Malay, White, Khoi, San, and Griqua. White South Africans are descendants of Dutch, German, French Huguenots, English and other European and Jewish settlers. And our Indian population came to South Africa as indentured labourers to work in the sugar plantations in the British colony of Natal in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. The population of more than fifty million people is made up of African (40.2 million, or 79.5%),White (4.6 million, or 9.0%), Coloured (4.5 million, or 9.0%), and Indian/Asian (1.3 million, or 2.5%). And, having travelled most of the world, I can confidently say, you won’t find friendlier, more hospitable and accommodating people anywhere, irrespective of their race, culture, language or creed. We have nine provinces (Eastern Cape, Gauteng, KwaZulu- Natal, Mpumalanga, Northern Cape, Limpopo, North West, Free State, and Western Cape) and eleven official languages: Afrikaans (13%), English (8%), isiNdebele (1.6%), isiXhosa (18%), isiZulu (24%), Sesotho sa Leboa (9%), Sesotho (8%), Setswana (8%), siSwati (3%),Tshivenda (2%), and Xitsonga (4%).4 Throw all of this together in a democracy not quite twenty years old (a tempestuous teenager, if ever there was one), and you get an effervescent, energetic, dynamic, and often a little chaotic, melting pot – of cultures, people, views, politics, opinions, and circumstance. After the tragedy and oppression of Apartheid, we are still very much coming to terms with – and are sometimes a little overwhelmed by – all the facets of the freedom-diamond. Which means that we argue incessantly, shout, point fingers, blame, accuse, denounce, complain, and criticize, mostly loudly and publicly, like all enthusiastic democrats should. But when our beloved Bafana-Bafana (the national football team), Springboks (our twice World Cup-winning rugby team) or Proteas (the cricket guys) walk onto the field, we stand united, shoulder to shoulder. And mostly, in our day-to-day-lives, we get along rather well. We increasingly study and work and live and love and socialise together, in great harmony. Of course, we have our problems. Poverty is the major one. “There is a consensus amongst most economic and political analysts that approximately 40% of South Africans are living in poverty – with the poorest 15% in a desperate struggle to survive.” However, we are making steady progress. The percentage of the South African population with access to clean drinking water has increased from 62% in 1994, to 93% in 2011. Access to electricity has increased from 34% in 1994, to 84% in 2011.5 In 2010, 13.5 million South Africans benefited from access to social grants, 8.5 million of whom were children, 3.5 million pensioners and 1.5 million people with disabilities. In 1994, only 2.5 million people had access to social grants, the majority of whom were pensioners. And since 1994, 435 houses have been built every day for the poor.6 And you might have heard about our other challenge – South Africa has a bit of a reputation when it comes to crime. I am most definitely going out on a limb here, but having studied the statistics, and looked at the (often unfair) comparisons over the past five years, I honestly believe we don’t quite deserve it. “. . . in relation to the overall risk of victimisation, South Africans are not much more likely to become victims of crime than people in other parts of the world,” Anthony Altbeker recently wrote in a carefully considered and exhaustively researched contribution to the marvellous Opinion Pieces by South African Thought Leaders.7 To put the matter into further perspective: In the two years leading up to the FIFA World Cup held in South Africa in 2010, almost every British, French and German journalist who interviewed me, asked the same question, more or less: “How big a slaughter is it going to be for fans attending the games?” Some were downright accusatory: “How dare you host this magnificent event in such a hazardous country?” A British tabloid even predicted a ‘machete race war’ waiting for visitors.8 And how many soccer fans died during the tournament? None.9 Furthermore, the attendees who were affected by crime-related incidents represented a very meagre 0.009% of the fans. That is far, far less than, for instance, the crime rate in Wales. When World Cup tourists were asked if they would consider visiting South Africa again, 96% said ‘yes’. As a matter of fact, if you are a tourist from the Northern Hemisphere visiting my beautiful country, your chances of becoming a victim of violent crime is less than 0.67%.10 (Compare this to the fact that “the 2011 British Behaviour Abroad Report published by the UK’s Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) noted that the death rate (including murder and natural causes) of Britons in Thailand was forty-one per 100,000 tourists and for those visiting Germany was twenty-four. Tourists from the UK are far safer visiting South Africa”11 – with just 14.6 per 100,000.12) South Africa’s murder rate dropped by 6.5% in 2010-2011, attempted murder by 12.2%, robbery with aggravating circumstances was down by 12%, and house robberies by 10%.13 Our police services are slowly but surely turning the tide. We struggle with inadequate service delivery, our politicians don’t always live up to our expectations, and our unemployment rate is too high. But our economy is robust, and easily out-performs first-world countries like Greece (no surprise there), Italy, and Spain. South African Tax Revenue has increased from R100 billion in 1994 to R640 billion in 2010. Our debt to GDP ratio is 32% (USA 100%, Japan 200%, UK 90%). (The World Bank recommends a ratio of 60%.) And we are ranked first out of 142 countries in respect of regulation of security exchanges by the World Economic Forum Global Competitiveness Report 2011/12.14 According to the Open Budget Index, South Africa has the most transparent budget in the world. We are the only African country that is a member of the G20. In the Economist Intelligence Unit’s Survey of Democratic Freedom, South Africa ranks 31st out of 184 countries. And according to the Global Competitiveness Report 2010/11, South Africa has the 34th most efficient government out of the 139 countries ranked.15 The number of tourists visiting South Africa has grown from 3.9 million in 1994 to 11.3 million in 2010. South Africa is ranked among the top five countries in the world in respect of tourism growth (growing at three times the global average).16 I could go on. South Africa’s learner-to-teacher ratio improved from 1:50 in 1994 to 1:31 in 2010. According to the Global Competitiveness Report 2011/12, South Africa is ranked 13th out of 142 countries for its quality of management schools. 61% of South African primary school children and 30% of high school children receive free meals as part of the school feeding scheme.17 But none of these facts and figures, as inspiring as they are, will reveal the real reason why I am so unwaveringly optimistic about my country’s future. It is one of the major reasons for the peaceful transition miracle of 1994, it is something woven into the texture of everyday South African life, hidden from the fleeting eyes of foreign journalists on a flying visit, mostly talking only to important folks: The goodwill of ordinary people. Every day, in cities, towns, and tiny villages, small acts of kindness happen between human beings. Individuals who extend a helping hand across racial, cultural, political and linguistic divides, who extend friendship and kindness and empathy. I have been witnessing this for more than forty years, and I absolutely believe it is this goodwill that will carry us through, no matter how challenging the future may be. 1 “Books are the carriers of civilization. Without books, history is silent, literature dumb, science crippled, thought and speculation at a standstill. They are engines of change, windows on the world, lighthouses erected in the sea of time.” - Barbara W. Tuchman, American popular historian and author, 1912-1989. 2 http://www.bcb.uwc.ac.za/envfacts/facts/biosa.htm 3 http://www.sa-venues.com/game_lodges_nationwide_south_afr.htm
 4 http://www.safrica.info/about/facts.htm (percentages rounded off)
 5 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/fast_facts_and_quick_stats/index.html
 6 Ibid. 7 Penguin, 2011. p. 47.
 8 http://www.dailystar.co.uk/posts/view/129402/WORLD-CUP-MACHETE- THREAT/
 9 http://www.truecrimexpo.co.za/
 10 http://www.info.gov.za/issues/crime/crime_aprsept_ppt.pdf
 11 http://www.issafrica.org/iss_today.php?ID=1394
 12 Ibid.
 13 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/crime/crime_statistics_show_drop_in_ murder_rate.html
 14 http://www.sagoodnews.co.za/fast_facts_and_quick_stats/index.html 15 Ibid.
 16 Ibid. 17 Ibid.

25 May
Barclays Pavilion

Eric Schmidt at Hay Festival

1pm

Eric Schmidt at Hay

Michael Moritz

Sir Michael Moritz was born in Cardiff, studied at Oxford and became a journalist at Time magazine in the US in the late 1970s. It was during this period that he met the young Steve Jobs and wrote the first book about Apple, The Little Kingdom: The Private Story of Apple Computer. Moritz co-authored a second business book, Going for Broke: The Chrysler Story, and in 1986 joined Sequoia Capital, in Silicon Valley, California.Sequoia Capital's close alliances with young founders have been transformed into companies now worth nearly $1.5 trillion - the most of any private investment firm in the world. These include the first investments in companies such as Apple and Cisco and, more recently, YouTube, Airbnb, Dropbox and WhatsApp. Michael Moritz has been a member of the Board of Directors of Google, Yahoo!, PayPal and LinkedIn. In 2012 he became chairman of Sequoia Capital and was knighted in 2013. His family's philanthropic work includes Europe's largest scholarship programme for low income university students. The son of refugees from Nazi Germany, he lives in San Francisco with his wife, Harriet Heyman.