Related to: 'Lou Wakefield'

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Expertise Economy

Kelly Palmer, David Blake
Authors:
Kelly Palmer, David Blake
Hodder & Stoughton

Flight or Fright

Stephen King, Bev Vincent, Michael Lewis, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Richard Matheson, Ambrose Bierce, E.C. Tubb, Tom Bissell, Dan Simmons, Cody Goodfellow, John Varley, Joe Hill, David J. Schow, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Peter Treemayne, James L. Dickey
Authors:
Stephen King, Bev Vincent, Michael Lewis, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle, Richard Matheson, Ambrose Bierce, E.C. Tubb, Tom Bissell, Dan Simmons, Cody Goodfellow, John Varley, Joe Hill, David J. Schow, Ray Bradbury, Roald Dahl, Peter Treemayne, James L. Dickey
Two Roads

The Lost Daughter

David Ashton
Authors:
David Ashton

For fans of Elementary, Ripper Street and Sherlock Holmes - meet Jean Brash, a feisty, self-made woman turned sleuth in murky Victorian Edinburgh where crime and high society meet.After Mistress of the Just Land, the second adventure in David Ashton's Jean Brash series...A theatre company arrives in Leith to perform King Lear. A robbery is planned, a gruesome murder committed, both of which set Inspector James McLevy on the prowl, and Jean's past returns in the shape of the avenging son of a man she has long ago been accused of poisoning. Even more lethally, her own lost family life resurrects in the present, as a wild young actress who trails violence and death behind her, involves Jean in a dangerous complex game that gnaws at the very root of her identity.All this grounded in Leith's gritty backdrop - the rich exotic world of the theatre meeting the harsh reality of the streets.Past, present and future - this unholy trinity collide to overwhelm the world of Jean Brash and involve her in a tale where the abandoned child inside her demands the right to grieve as well as feel some fractured, fleeting joy.By the end, a chapter of Jean's life may close and a new future might be signalled in other lands and other countries...(P)2017 John Murray Press'Jean Brash is my favourite character and David Ashton's writing is as delicious, elegant and compelling as she is' Siobhan Redmond (Jean Brash in BBC Radio 4's McLevy series)

Two Roads

The Butcher's Hook

Janet Ellis
Authors:
Janet Ellis

***LONGLISTED FOR THE DESMOND ELLIOTT PRIZE 2016***'KNOWS HOW TO KEEP HER AUDIENCE HOOKED' The Times'A MASTERFUL STORYTELLER' Clare Mackintosh'DARK, WEIRD AND GLORIOUSLY FEMINIST' ElleGeorgian London, in the summer of 1763.At nineteen, Anne Jaccob, the elder daughter of well-to-do parents, meets Fub the butcher's apprentice and is awakened to the possibilities of joy and passion. Anne lives a sheltered life: her home is a miserable place and her parents have already chosen a more suitable husband for her than Fub. But Anne is an unusual young woman and is determined to pursue her own happiness in her own way......even if that means getting a little blood on her hands.'A SHARP EYE AND A SHARPER WIT' Guardian'A SPIRITED, DARK DEBUT' Woman & Home'STRANGE, DARK AND UTTERLY MESMERIC' Hannah KentPre-order Janet Ellis's new novel, How It Was, now!

Two Roads

Mistress of the Just Land

David Ashton
Authors:
David Ashton

'Jean Brash is my favourite character and David Ashton's writing is as delicious, elegant and compelling as she is' Siobhan Redmond (Jean Brash in BBC Radio 4's McLevy series)Jean Brash, who first appeared in BBC Radio 4's Inspector McLevy mysteries, is a formidable woman in her prime. Once a child of the streets, she is now Mistress of the Just Land, the best bawdy-hoose in Edinburgh and her pride and joy. But a murder in her establishment could wreck everything.New Year's Day - and through the misty streets of Victorian Edinburgh an elegant, female figure walks the cobblestones - with a certain vengeful purpose. Jean Brash, the Mistress of the Just Land, brings her cool intelligence to solving a murder, a murder that took place in her own bawdy-hoose. A prominent judge, strangled and left dangling, could bring her whole life to ruin and she didn't haul herself off the streets, up through low dirty houses of pleasure and violent vicious men - to let that come to pass. The search for the killers will take Jean back into her own dark past as she uncovers a web of political and sexual corruption in the high reaches of the Edinburgh establishment. A young boy's death long ago is demanding justice but, as the body count increases, she has little time before a certain Inspector James McLevy comes sniffing round like a wolf on the prowl. Jean may be on the side of natural justice but is she on the side of the law? Or will the law bring her down?

Two Roads

Shadow of the Serpent

David Ashton
Authors:
David Ashton

...WHILE THE STREETS OF LONDON HAD SHERLOCK HOLMES, THE DARK ALLEYS OF EDINBURGH HAD INSPECTOR JAMES McLEVY| 'ASHTON IS THE DIRECT HEIR TO ROBERT LOUIS STEVENSON' actor Brian Cox | 'EXCELLENT' The Sherlock Holmes Society | 'DRIPPING WITH MELODRAMA AND DERRING-DO' Herald ELEGANT AND CONVINCING' The Times 1880, Edinburgh.Election fever grips the city. But while the rich and educated argue about politics, in the dank wynds of the docks it's a struggle just to stay alive. When a prostitute is brutally murdered, disturbing memories from thirty years ago are stirred in Inspector McLevy who is soon lured into a murky world of politics, perversion and deception - and the shadow of the serpent. BASED ON THE LONG-RUNNING BBC RADIO 4 McLEVY DRAMA SERIESTHE INSPECTOR MCLEVY SERIES1 - Shadow of the Serpent2 - Fall from Grace3 - A Trick of the Light4 - Nor Will He Sleep

Hodder & Stoughton

Hot to Trot

Lou Wakefield
Authors:
Lou Wakefield
Hodder & Stoughton

Sleeping Partners

Lou Wakefield
Authors:
Lou Wakefield

When Pauline Watkins wakes up one morning to discover she's thirty-nine, she decides Something Must Be Done. About her marriage to a partner who thinks that bedtime is just for sleeping, about her routine job - her routine life. An exotic holiday would be a start, and fairexchange.biz offers a solution - swap her council estate semi outside Leicester for a piece of paradise in Australia. Pauline presses Send. On the other side of the world, Lorna Mackenzie has reached a similar conclusion, but for a rather different reason: her sleeping partner is sleeping around. A family wedding provides the excuse for Lorna to sweep her mother and her faithless husband up into Business Class and head chez Watkins. It may be better to travel hopefully than to arrive, but for Pauline and Lorna, a holiday swap turns into the journey of a lifetime.

Hodder Paperbacks

Rural Bliss

Lou Wakefield
Authors:
Lou Wakefield

Hodder & Stoughton

Tuscan Soup

Lou Wakefield
Authors:
Lou Wakefield

Single art teacher Marion Hardcastle is rather regretting having agreed to come on holiday with Tom and Janice Cowlishaw. They aren't exactly kindred spirits. And they aren't exactly being made to feel welcome by the supercilious owner of the Palazzo Fratorelli. The Contessa seems to be much more interested in ingratiating herself with her other guests, famous theatre director Terence Armstrong, and film stars, Christopher Bassett and Beatrice Miller-Mander. But, in the warmth of the Italian sunshine, the guests at the Palazzo gradually start to throw off their traditional British reserve - and so begins an extraordinary week of drama, danger, passion, violence, tears, tantrums, sordid secrets - and unexpected romance. Even Marion thaws enough to start enjoying herself. And, who knows, perhaps even fall in love . . .

Chapter One: A Morning in Vermillion

SHADES OF GREY, by Jasper Fforde

Read the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's brilliant SHADES OF GREY.

Chapter One: Suicide Corner

SCARP by Nick Papadimitriou

Read the first chapter of Nick Papadimitriou's SCARP.

By Chris Cleave, 15 October 2008

Suggested Wikipedia entry for Sceptre

Chris Cleave, author of THE OTHER HAND, puts his neck on the line and lays bare the secret history of Sceptre.

Chapter One

RIVER OF SMOKE, by Amitav Ghosh

Read the first chapter of Amitav Ghosh's RIVER OF SMOKE, the second book of his Ibis trilogy.

A fun Q&A with the author of KNIFE EDGE

Fergus McNeill Q&A

Cold war spies or hot action heroes? Cold war spies. I love the idea of hidden secrets and quiet menace - of a quiet and clever war, fought in the shadows. And John Le Carré writes with such effortless beauty in those early novels like Tinker Tailor Soldier Spy that it's impossible not to be swept away by the story. Drive or be driven? Well, I dislike traffic, and I hate speed cameras, but on balance, I'd say drive. Just. Music or TV? Music. I listen to music whenever I'm writing, using it to manage my mood like an emotional bookmark. Friends describe my musical tastes as weird, filmic or "that ambient rubbish" but it gets my head where it needs to be. My iPhone is full of tracks by artists like Deaf Center, Christina Vantzou, or A Winged Victory For The Sullen. Music also helps me to see places differently. I do a lot of my writing "on location" and listening to something sinister while visiting the scene of a fictional crime makes everything feel terribly real. Salad or steak? Steak. I'm told that I'm as far away from being a vegetarian as it's possible to be. In fact, until quite recently, this was my Facebook avatar: City or country? It's a tough choice, but I'd have to say country. I grew up in a tiny Scottish village, up in the hills between Glasgow, Stirling and Loch Lomond. We took my son there when he was eight years old and, while out for a walk, he stopped and gave me a puzzled look, asking what it was that he could hear. It took me a moment to realise that it was silence – he'd never heard it before. Morning or night? Night. All the best things happen at night. Also, I'm usually baffled in the morning, at least until the coffee kicks in. Pen or Pencil? Neither. My handwriting is achingly slow, and almost completely illegible. Thankfully, I'm a quick typist; I'd still be struggling to finish my first book if I had to scrawl it out by hand. When did you know you were going to be a writer? It still hasn't sunk in. I've had two books published, and my third is almost done, but I still feel as though I've gate-crashed a party I have no right to attend. As to when I knew I *wanted* to be a writer, that was when my secondary school English teacher inspired me with her absolute love of language. Thank you Mrs Pearson. Which authors are your biggest inspirations? I could choose so many great writers across different genres, but I'll mention two that aren't from crime. Firstly, C S Friedman, who wrote the stunning Coldfire Trilogy. In this story, she created one of the most charismatically evil characters I've ever read, and managed to sustain him as a main protagonist for three books. Her ability to stir empathy, where there should have been none, was a big influence on me when I was developing my own charming serial killer. The other author I'll highlight is Philip K Dick. Hugely talented, he was also the master of the unhappy ending, and I rather like books where there's no guarantee of a cheery conclusion, with everything neatly wrapped-up. When anything can happen, the stakes seem so much higher. Which book would you take to a desert island? Assuming that most islands come equipped with the Bible and the complete works of Shakespeare, I'd take The Lord Of The Rings by J R R Tolkien. Beneath the epic landscapes and the fantasy cast lies a beautiful story of sacrifice, duty, and friendship. If I could rewrite history, I would . . . …take back some of the stupid things I've said, especially if they hurt people close to me. While it might be tempting to undo historical atrocities, good things frequently arise from tragedy, and I'd hate my good intentions to make things worse. Better that I try and remedy my own mistakes – it's all I'm qualified to fix. In another age I would have been . . . Hopefully a full-time writer. My other skills - game designer, digital artist, photographer - aren’t really transferable to many historical eras. Of course, I'd have to do some work on my penmanship if I wanted anyone to actually read what I wrote... Who would your fantasy dinner guests be? Confining myself to people who are alive, and trying to ensure a group that would spark interesting conversation, I'd invite J K Rowling, Bill Gates, Sir David Attenborough, and Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II. I'm confident they'd all hit it off and, so long as I got a grown-up to do the cooking, the evening would be a big success. Who would you choose to survive the apocalypse with? My wife and son. I wouldn't want to survive without them, and they're both much more practical than me, so I probably wouldn't be *able* to survive without them. Which book do you wish you had written? The answer to this question changes depending on my mood, but currently I’d say Lexicon by Max Barry. Reading it was like taking the first ever bite of a new favourite food. It powers forward with such confidence, really quickening the pulse. I can only imagine the buzz of creating something so relentless. If a film was made of your life, which actor would play you? I’m a big fan of fellow-Glaswegian Peter Capaldi, from his time on The Crow Road through to The Thick Of It. I’m sure he’d be up for the role, so long as he doesn’t have any other new projects on the horizon... Who is your favourite crime/thriller character across literature, film, TV, theatre etc? Rick Deckard, from Blade Runner / Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep. I've loved every version of him, from the first cut of the movie with the Marlowe-esque voice-over, to the depressive protagonist in the novel. There's something profoundly compelling about characters who are forced to face the truth about themselves through their investigation and pursuit of others, and in Deckard's case that truth is particularly poignant. At the same time, he's an anti-hero, dwarfed by larger-than-life adversaries, which makes it easier to empathise with him – and if you know the story, you'll see there's an irony in that.

Chapter One: The Old Long Since

RULES OF CIVILITY, by Amor Towles

Read the first chapter of Amor Towles' RULES OF CIVILITY.

Chapter One: Murdering Mrs Durance

THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS, by Thomas Keneally

Read the first chapter of Sceptre Booker prize-winning author Thomas Keneally's newest novel, THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS.

Reading Group Guide

THE SHINING by Stephen King

Reading guide for use with Stephen King's THE SHINING.

Chapter One

TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, by John le Carré

Read the first chapter of John le Carré's acclaimed TINKER TAILOR SOLDIER SPY, now a major film.

By his editor, Phillipa Pride

An Introduction to Stephen King

Philippa Pride, Stephen King's longtime editor, gives an introductory guide to one of the world's most popular authors.