Related to: 'David Benjamin'

Nicholas Brealey International

Cracking Complexity

David Komlos, David Benjamin
Authors:
David Komlos, David Benjamin

The revolutionary process at the heart of Cracking Complexity is backed by empirical research from the authors' work with world-leading companies whose experiences will serve as case-studies. Komlos and Benjamin's approach harnesses disparate views from inside and outside of an organization, including front-line employees, former competitors, theorists and disruptors around a big, messy problem to form a high-functioning team of people, a "mega-brain," that can see every side of a problem and identify the best solution(s) for it. Complex issues are solved in a matter of days, not months, not years, a time-frame supported by the authors' research and practice over three decades.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Mastering The Market Cycle

Howard Marks
Authors:
Howard Marks
Nicholas Brealey International

When Cultures Collide

Richard Lewis
Authors:
Richard Lewis
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Counter Mentor Leadership

Kelly Riggs, Robby Riggs
Authors:
Kelly Riggs, Robby Riggs
Sceptre

The Fortunes

Peter Ho Davies
Authors:
Peter Ho Davies
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Greats on Leadership

Jocelyn Davis
Authors:
Jocelyn Davis
Sceptre

Wealth Secrets of the 1%

Sam Wilkin
Authors:
Sam Wilkin

'Infuriating... Wilkin's main claim is that the super-rich have discovered 'secret' ways of both making and preserving their fortunes... like [Capital author Thomas] Piketty, Wilkin has a love-hate relationship with capitalism. He takes the view that most billionaires are rich because, one way or another, they have found ways to rig the market.' The TimesWhat does it take to make a fortune? Hard work? Great ideas? Intelligence? Business acumen? Or something else entirely? Spanning centuries and continents, from the Ancient World to the 21st century, Wealth Secrets of the 1% uncovers the economic principles that enable a fortunate few to get really rich. Witty, provocative and immaculately researched, it is essential and revelatory reading at a time when 1% of the world's population owns half of its wealth.'Clever [and] entertaining, with a distinctly satirical edge' Daily Mail'Illuminating [and] eye-opening... sure to make libertarian heads explode' Kirkus Reviews'What makes this book different is that Sam Wilkin is an inside man' Daily Telegraph'No one gets really rich reading how-to-get-rich handbooks...Wilkin offers up the real scoop in Wealth Secrets of the One Percent, a delicious - and insight-packed - send-up of the genre.' Toomuch.com

Teach Yourself

Decision Making In A Week

Martin Manser
Authors:
Martin Manser

Making decisions just got easierYou make decisions all the time in everyday life: what to eat, what clothes to wear, with whom you spend your leisure time and how you spend your money. In your business life you are also constantly making decisions: the different activities you - and your business colleagues - need to carry out in order to arrive at a sound decision. At work, you are deciding how to spend your time, which emails to answer, what subjects to raise at a meeting, when is the best time for your company to launch a new product, what companies you should invest in, what you are not willing to compromise on in negotiations, what policies to develop and how best to market your products and services. Some of these decisions may have already been made for you by other colleagues, usually those above you in your company or organization, and your task is merely to implement them. In other matters, however, you can exercise some control over the actual decision-making process.Each of the seven chapters in Decision Making In A Week covers a different aspect of the decision-making process:- Sunday: Know your aims clearly. What are you actually making a decision about?- Monday: Collect relevant information. Consider all the relevant factors as you gather the information you need.- Tuesday: Identify different options. Widen your thinking, challenge assumptions and consider creative solutions.- Wednesday: Work effectively as a team. Make decisions as a group so that colleagues will feel motivated to implement the decision.- Thursday: Evaluate different options. Set objective criteria against which you can examine the various options you have identified.- Friday: Make an informed decision and implement it, communicating it well to all the relevant parties.- Saturday: Review the decision carefully, evaluating the whole decision-making process, noting what went well and learning from mistakes.

Teach Yourself

Sociology: A Complete Introduction: Teach Yourself

Paul Oliver
Authors:
Paul Oliver

Sociology: A Complete Introduction is designed to give you everything you need to succeed, all in one place. It covers the key areas that students are expected to be confident in, outlining the basics in clear, jargon-free English and providing added-value features like summaries of key experiments and even lists of questions you might be asked in your seminar or exam.The text is split into four parts, with an emphasis throughout on understanding and treating all concepts with clarity and precision. The first part covers theoretical issues including research methods. Part two looks at the social environment, including urbanization, work, politics, religion and the mass media. The final two parts examine global society and the position of the individual.It is structured to mirror the way Sociology is taught on many A Level and university courses with each chapter covering a key introductory area. By the end you'll have a clear understanding of the essential principles of sociology.

Teach Yourself

Bookkeeping for Small Businesses

Andy Lymer, Nick Rowbottom
Authors:
Andy Lymer, Nick Rowbottom

Is this the right book for me?Book keeping is neither dull nor mysterious - its rules are logical and straightforward and are readily mastered by practice. Successful Bookkeeping for Small Business is a substantial yet easy to follow introduction to the principles of bookkeeping and the practical skills of recording transactions, posting the ledgers and preparing final accounts.Written by finance and accounting experts from the University of Birmingham this book: - Explains the purpose and use of books of original entry as the basis of the double-entry system. - Describes the processes of recording purchases, sales and cash transactions. - Shows how these records are used to prepare the final accounts, the manufacturing, trading and profit and loss accounts and the balance sheet to provide accurate financial statements. - Explores petty cash, depreciation, partnership, company law, business documents and the effect of changes in IT.Worked examples throughout allow you to put the theory into practice. There is also a wide range of carefully graded questions and exercises with sample answers. In short, it demystifies the art of bookkeeping and gives you the confidence you need to tackle your books.Successful Bookkeeping for Small Business includes:Chapter 1: What is book keeping?Chapter 2: Business documentsChapter 3: The business transaction, purchases and salesChapter 4: Purchase and sales transactions and ledger accountsChapter 5: Cash transactionsChapter 6: The bank reconciliationChapter 7: Petty cashChapter 8: The (general) journalChapter 9: Writing up the booksChapter 10: The trial balanceChapter 11: What is profit or loss?Chapter 12: The revenue account: the trading, profit and loss and appropriation accountsChapter 13: The balance sheetChapter 14: Adjustments in the final accountsChapter 15: DepreciationChapter 16: Clubs, societies and charities book keepingChapter 17: Information technology and book keepingChapter 18: PartnershipsChapter 19: Limited companiesChapter 20: The analysis and interpretations of accountsLearn effortlessly with a new easy-to-read page design and added features:Not got much time?One, five and ten-minute introductions to key principles to get you started.Author insightsLots of instant help with common problems and quick tips for success, based on the authors' many years of experience.Test yourselfTests in the book and online to keep track of your progress.Extend your knowledgeExtra online articles to give you a richer understanding of bookkeeping.Try thisInnovative exercises illustrate what you've learnt and how to use it.

Two Roads

Better Than Before

Gretchen Rubin
Authors:
Gretchen Rubin

'A LOT OF US WOULD LIKE A RUBIN IN OUR LIVES' The Times Magazine - 'JUST READ THIS BOOK... IT'S EXCELLENT' Viv Groskop - 'FASCINATING, PERSUASIVE' Guardian Many experts suggest one-size-fits-all solutions for habit change, but as we all know from experience, there's no single magic answer. Better Than Before shows us how to understand habits and to change them for good, and gives us the thrill of recognition and relief, because at last, we'll have the vocabulary and framework to change our habits successfully. Solutions exist!Along the way, Rubin uses herself as a guinea pig, tests her theories on family and friends, and answers some of the most pressing questions - oddly, questions that other writers and researchers tend to ignore: - Why do I find it tough to create a habit for something I love to do?- I want to help someone else make a change. But how?- Why do practically all dieters gain the weight back - plus more?- How quickly can I change a habit?- Why can I make time for everyone else, but can't make time for myself?Whether you want to get more sleep, finish a project, maintain a healthy weight, or stop checking devices, habits make it possible. With Rubin's signature mix of rigorous research and easy humour, Better Than Before will make us eager to start work on our own habits - even before we've finished the book.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Green Scorecard

Patricia Pulliam Phillips
Authors:
Patricia Pulliam Phillips

Too many organizations are currently caught in a "green slump," struggling to engage in sustainability projects and making far less progress than they should be. Some businesses are striving to lead the way by equipping their facilities with new, energy-saving technologies or creating projects that contain post-consumer materials, whereas others may be just now implementing company-wide recycling programs. No matter which green initiative you choose, in order to succeed companies must adopt a results-based, return on investment (ROI) focus that helps them to identify, develop and implement green projects that add value-from an economic, environmental and societal perspective. In The Green scorecard, business leaders-from CEOs and CFOs to project managers and engineers-receive a reliable measurement and evaluation system that delivers credible data for decision makers. The valuable book, based on the ROI Institute's internationally renowned methodology, gives you clear steps for determining the overall worth of green projects-for both the environment and the bottom line.

Teach Yourself

Easy PC Care

Anthony Price
Authors:
Anthony Price
Nicholas Brealey International

Mexicans & Americans

Ned Crouch
Authors:
Ned Crouch

Whether negotiating a delivery date, launching a local franchise or renting a car in Mexico City, speaking the language and knowing the rules of business are not enough. In any culture where yes can mean no-or sometimes maybe-even giants like Wal-Mart and IBM can make costly mistakes. Mexicans and Americans gets to the heart of our differences and lays the groundwork for cultural fluency. Here is a humorous and insightful firthand look at how to succeed in working with Mexicans-on either side of the border. Steeped in the richness of Mexican culture and history, Ned Crouch helps us understand the most critical elements that determine what works and what doesn't when Mexicans and Americans come together in business: out different views of time and space, and our construction and use of language. He debunks the manana stereotype and offers specific advice on how to cross the cultural divide that separates us.

David Komlos

For more than 20 years, David has pursued his passion for building global companies that serve the world's most senior leaders across the Fortune 500 and national governments. His strength is in bringing fundamentally different approaches into the mainstream. His involvement cuts across industries and sectors that include financial services, life sciences, automotive, entertainment, ICT, governments and NGOs.David is a friend and trusted confidant to many global leaders. He remains actively involved with Syntegrity's clients, and as a speaker he frequently presents on complexity, problem solving, mobilization, and scaling talent.Prior to Syntegrity, David was responsible for leading strategy and M&A for North America Media Engines Inc., a TSX-listed company. He holds an MBA from the Schulich School of Business, and a Bachelor of Arts from the University of Toronto, Canada.

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Chapter One: A Morning in Vermillion

SHADES OF GREY, by Jasper Fforde

Read the first chapter of Jasper Fforde's brilliant SHADES OF GREY.

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John Goldsmith on The Saint

In 1953, the journalist and author Richard Usborne published a seminal book called Clubland Heroes. It was an affectionate, nostalgia-tinged analysis and celebration of the fictional gentleman-adventurers whose exploits had thrilled him when he was a boy, the protagonists of three immensely popular novelists of the inter-war period: John Buchan’s Richard Hannay, ‘Sapper’s Bulldog Drummond and Dornford Yates’s Jonathan Mansel. These characters had a great deal in common. They all enjoyed substantial private means and were rich enough not to let anything as vulgar as earning a living interfere with their adventuring. They were proudly upper-class and, except in Hannay’s case, Public School and Oxbridge. They had all had damned good wars. They drove Rolls-Royces. They were viscerally racist and anti-Semitic. They believed in rough justice, an eye for a tooth, in stepping in where plodding policemen feared to tread, or were unable to tread because of inferior birth and breeding. They regularly bumped off the villains on the grounds – if they thought about it at all – that they were simply saving the hangman the bother. Crucially, they were all members of London Clubs, those exclusive enclaves in the St. James’s area, where the elite lunched and dined in splendour, wreathed in cigar smoke, waited on by silent, obsequious servants. But there was another writer, competing in the same market, equally successful, equally adored by generations of school-boys. His name was Leslie Charteris and his hero was Simon Templar, the Saint. Usborne does not ignore Charteris and the Saint entirely. He does something rather more disagreeable: he dismisses them both in a few disparaging lines. The Saint, he feels, is a lesser character than Hannay, Drummond and Mansel; Charteris is a lesser writer than Buchan, ‘Sapper’ and Yates. In the strict technical sense, Usborne is right not to include the Saint in his pantheon because Simon Templar would not have been seen dead in one of those stuffy St. James’s clubs. Indeed, throughout the Charteris oeuvre the Saint is devastatingly satirical about the denizens of such places, with their snobbery, prejudices, prudery and superannuated political opinions. (Hannay, Drummond and Mansel were all firmly of the Conservative Right.) But in writing off the Saint as a character and Charteris as a prose stylist, Usborne was wrong. I first encountered the Saint, as I did the other three, in the 1950s when I was banged up in a prep school in Hertfordshire. Even for that dismal era, the school was a time warp, a little world of its own that would still have been comfortably familiar to Hannay, Drummond and Mansel but which would have excited the Saint’s mockery – and pity for its young inmates. We were taught to worship Games and (a grimly Protestant) God. In the Cadet Corps we were trained to bayonet the Hun – as per the First World War – rather than the Boche of the Second World War. For competitive events – almost all sporting – the school was divided into sets named after military heroes: Roberts, Kitchener, Haig and Beatty. Our physical horizons were bounded by the red-brick turrets and walls of the school buildings, reminiscent of a Victorian prison, and fenced, gated playing fields and parkland. Beyond lay forbidden territory, strictly out of bounds, inhabited mainly by dangerous ruffians called oiks. Our intellectual horizons were limited to a curriculum designed for a sole purpose: to get one into a decent public school. The food was abominable, the school rules numberless and enforced by the frequent swishing of cane and slipper. Into this narrow, isolated realm stepped the Saint. He was dashing, debonair, didn’t give a damn about rules and regulations, lived by his own code, went where he wanted to go, did what he wanted to do, leaving policeman and criminal alike gasping in his wake. He didn’t drive a boring, boxy Rolls-Royce; he drove a sleek, superfast Hirondel. He was a citizen of the world, perfectly at home in any great city where, of course, he would know which was the best hotel and the finest restaurant, and where there was always an old friend to lend a hand in his latest endeavour. He was rich, yes, but the money didn’t come from a country estate or a share portfolio: he earned it by creaming off his usual ten per cent of the booty or scooping a reward. He was a free spirit, openminded, without a racist or anti-Semitic bone in his immaculately clothed body. His adventures sprang naturally out of his globe-trotting life, his insatiable curiosity about everything and everybody, his infallible nose for a mystery, his quixotic sense of justice. He was witty. He was clever. He had style, panache. He killed, certainly, but mostly in self-defence, and his preferred modus operandi was to step deftly aside and let dog eat dog. He never displayed the sadistic relish of Bulldog Drummond, the patriotic fervour of Richard Hannay, or the Old Testament righteousness of Jonathan Mansel. Most thrilling of all, perhaps, he lived openly with a woman, Patricia Holm, who was not his wife and whose charms could be only furtively and feverishly imagined. Although I loved reading about Hannay, Drummond and Mansel, they were, in a sense, only Senior Prefects writ large. They conformed to the rules – indeed, they strictly imposed them on others. They would triumph on the cricket field, the football pitch and in the boxing ring and eventually rise to be Head Boy. The Saint, by contrast, might perhaps win the Poetry Prize but would undoubtedly be expelled. He was completely different. He was a liberator. He pointed a finger, or rather two fingers, with a cigarette held nonchalantly between them, towards a wider, more sophisticated world. He showed that silly or irksome rules could and should be circumvented, pomposity laughed at, an individual path pursued. So much for the character. What of the literary skills of his creator? It was only years later, when I had the job of adapting some of the stories for the screen, that I came fully to appreciate what a superb writer Leslie Charteris was. The first task of the adaptor is to analyse the plot. I quickly discovered that in terms of the overall impact of a given story, the plot plays a relatively minor role. Certainly, the plots are well, often brilliantly, constructed, with all the requisite twists and turns and surprises and – most important – a rigorous logic. But the real fascination lies elsewhere: in description, in the development of a particular situation or scene, above all, in dialogue. The prose is spare and sinewy where the pace of the narrative demands it, but where there is space for a pause, Charteris fills it with paragraph after paragraph, sometimes page after page, of highly entertaining, perfectly honed writing, with a lightness of touch and a refined humour worthy of P.G. Wodehouse. (‘By the tum-tum of Tutankhaman!’ the Saint exclaims to Mr Teal in the first story in the present collection. Bertie Wooster himself couldn’t have put it better.) The dyspeptic critic might dismiss all this as mere padding: Charteris either lacked the powers of invention or was simply too idle to construct an elaborate plot and made up for it by shoving in a lot of extraneous guff. This would be to miss the point completely. The minimisation of plot and maximisation of other elements is the warp and woof of the Charteris style. What other thriller writer would think of (or dare to proceed with) spicing up a murder mystery with satirical verse? And the verse itself is worthy of Ogden Nash: Trained from an early age to rule (At that immortal Public School Whose playing fields have helped to lose Innumerable Waterloos), His brains, his wit, his chin, were all Infinitesimal . . . So how does Charteris, the prose stylist, measure up to the writers Usborne set above him? Take ‘Sapper’, the nom-deplume of an offi cer-turned-prison governor called H.C. McNeile. His literary skills can most charitably be described as workmanlike. There is none of the verve, vivacity and pure relish for words that you find in Charteris. And the character of Drummond himself verges on the Fascistic. John Buchan is a much better writer, a fine writer in fact, but his plots rely unnervingly on coincidence and his attempts to reproduce the slang of the criminal classes, or even worse of Americans, are embarrassing. Dornford Yates is in a category of his own. He developed a unique style, full of archaisms and purple passages that some admire (I am one of them) and others find ludicrous. His plotting is superb, perhaps because his method was never to know himself, at the end of a day’s writing, what was going to happen next. But he is most definitely an acquired taste. By any standard, Leslie Charteris is worthy to stand beside Buchan and Yates – and well above ‘Sapper’. And in The Saint and Mr Teal he is on top form. He was twenty-six when he wrote it and it has all the freshness and vigour of an early work. The three stories are exciting, surprising, funny – and great, great fun. The character of the Saint is fully formed, with all the swashbuckling sparkle that kept him alive through the following decades and saw him emerge, in the form of the incomparable Roger Moore, as a globally recognised figure. In the late 1970s I found myself one day in a remote fishing village on the coast of Brazil. When I told the locals that I was a writer they naturally asked me what I had written. I mentioned various novels and television shows, all of which were met with blank stares. But when I mentioned the Saint faces lit up, recognition was instant. It was smiles and ecstatic cries of ‘El Santo! El Santo!’ all round. The Saint had travelled a long, long way. He is still travelling. - John Goldsmith

Chapter One

XO by Jeffery Deaver

Read the first chapter of Jeffery Deaver's newest Kathryn Dance thriller, XO.