Sceptre - Award winning literary fiction & non-fiction

  • About Sceptre

    Sceptre is the literary imprint of Hodder & Stoughton, publishing fiction and non-fiction from around the globe. Our aim is to pick books that are not only entertaining and absorbing but also thought-provoking, surprising and superbly written - the kind of books that cast fresh light on the human experience and are not easily forgotten. Our authors have won prizes from the Booker to the Prix Goncourt and cover an eclectic range of themes and subjects from the dismantling of a Parisian cemetery to cloud-spotting. They include long-established writers such as Thomas Keneally and Melvyn Bragg, those whom we've launched like David Mitchell, Andrew Miller, Siri Hustvedt, Charles Frazier, Jake Arnott, Jill Dawson, Natasha Solomons, Emma Henderson, Glen David Gold and Gavin Pretor-Pinney, and those who've joined us - Chris Cleave, Giles Milton, Bahaa Taher, Clare Morrall, Andrew Cowan, Alexei Sayle, Peter Ho Davies, Jenn Ashworth, Tristam Gooley and many more. Though the list is small, we delight in finding outstanding new voices we can introduce to literature lovers: recent debutants include Ned Beauman, Ros Barber, Miroslav Penkov, Jess Richards, Nick Papadimitriou and Kevin Powers.
  • Sceptre History

    Sceptre is the literary imprint of Hodder & Stoughton, publishing works of fiction and non-fiction that are not only entertaining but also stimulating, provocative, sometimes challenging and always superbly written. Its authors have won prizes from the Booker to the Prix Goncourt, come from around the globe and cover a wide, eclectic range of themes and subjects.

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Sceptre

The Crossing

By Andrew Miller

She is sailing. She is alone. Ahead of her is the world's curve and beyond that, everything else. The known, the imagined, the imagined known.

Who else has entered Tim's life the way Maud did? This girl who fell past him, lay seemingly dead on the ground, then stood and walked. That was where it all began.

He wants her - wants to rescue her, to reach her. Yet there is nothing to suggest Maud has any need of him, that she is not already complete. A woman with a talent for survival, who works long hours and loves to sail - preferably on her own. A woman who, when a crisis comes, will turn to the sea for refuge, embarking on a voyage that will test her to the utmost, that will change everything . . .

From the Costa Award-winning author of Pure comes a viscerally honest, hypnotic portrait of modern love and motherhood, the lure of the sea and the ultimate unknowability of others. This pitch-perfect novel confirms Andrew Miller's position as one of the finest writers of his generation.

Told in his usual exquisite prose, the story centres on the strangely reticent character of Maud, who leaves the West Country after a tragedy and bravely attempts to single-handedly sail across the Atlantic. You know you're going to like a character when, in the first few pages, she falls 20ft in a boatyard, then gets up and tries to walk. Infused with nautical detail and the cool brine of the sea, this is perfect summer reading.We readers have a most fabulous time... The story of Tim's narcissism, self-deception and deception, and of the chiming treacheries of his friends and family, is rich and delicate enough to have sufficed for most contemporary novels...[the finale] guarantees that Maud, and questions about Maud, will linger in your mind long after you close this remarkable novelHypnotic... Andrew Miller has a poet's ear but he can also write white-knuckle passages that will leave you winded by towering waves. Most surprising of all, you'll find yourself rooting for Maud as she confronts the limits of her own detachmentVisceral and exquisitely written... few characters are so neutrally, impassively masterful. In her silence she is magnificent...the grand solitude of the sea passage, dialogue-free and with a punchy simplicity reminiscent of Hemingway, follows on beautifully from the judgment of those on land...Miller, wisely, hardly analyses Maud. But the portrayal of this practical, disconcerting figure is wildly emotional *****Achieves a kind of hallucinatory strangeness, simultaneously intriguing and disturbingPart relationship study, part sailing yarn, this odd yet enthralling book lingers long in the mind.A beautiful novel; moving, funny, mysterious and compelling. Maud is a stunning creation - a great modern heroine with a pure ancient heartFrom the author of the Costa Book of the Year Pure, a hypnotic, luminous exploration of buried grief and the mysterious workings of the heart.

Andrew Miller's first novel, Ingenious Pain, was published by Sceptre in 1997 and greeted as the debut of an outstanding new writer. It won the James Tait Black Memorial Prize, the International IMPAC Dublin Literary Award and the Grinzane Cavour Prize for the best foreign novel published in Italy.

It was followed by Casanova, then Oxygen, which was shortlisted for both the Booker Prize and the Whitbread Novel of the Year Award in 2001, The Optimists, and One Morning Like A Bird. In 2011, his sixth novel, Pure, was published to great acclaim and went on to win the Costa Book of the Year Award.

Andrew Miller's novels have been translated into thirty languages. Born in Bristol in 1960, he has lived in Spain, Japan, France and Ireland, and currently lives in Somerset.

The much anticipated follow-up to Miller's last novel PURE, which introduced him to a huge new audience - 180,000 copies sold of the paperback edition alone.Pure won the Costa Book of the Year Award 2011.Andrew Miller is one of the foremost writers of his generation. As well as winning the Costa Book of the Year, he's been shortlisted for the Booker and Whitbread awards with Oxygen and won the IMPAC and James Tait Black prizes with Ingenious Pain.Miller has ardent fans among writers and critics - 'His writing is a source of wonder and delight' Hilary Mantel, 'a writer of very rare and outstanding gifts' Independent on Sunday, 'one of our most skilful chroniclers of the human heart and mind' Sunday Times.Poignant literary fiction in the vein of Colm Toibin's Brooklyn, Ian McEwan's Atonement or Alan Hollinghurst's The Line of Beauty
Sceptre

Glow

By Ned Beauman

'ADDICTIVELY GOOD' The Times
'Over-whelming' Independent
'Supercharged' Evening Standard
'Deliciously, startlingly, exuberantly fresh' Guardian

With GLOW, Ned Beauman has reinvented the international conspiracy thriller for a new generation.

A hostage exchange outside a police station in Pakistan.
A botched defection in an airport hotel in New Jersey.
A test of loyalty at an abandoned resort in the Burmese jungle.
A boy and a girl locking eyes at a rave in a South London laundrette . . .

For the first time, Britain's most exciting young novelist turns his attention to the present day, as a conspiracy with global repercussions converges on one small flat above a dentist's office in Camberwell.

From the prizewinning author of BOXER, BEETLE and the Booker-longlisted THE TELEPORTATION ACCIDENT comes Ned Beauman's third and most thrilling novel to date.

Ned Beauman was born in 1985 in London. His debut novel, BOXER, BEETLE, was shortlisted for the Guardian First Book Award and the Desmond Elliot Prize and won the Writers' Guild Award for Best Fiction Book and the Goldberg Prize for Outstanding Debut Fiction. His second novel, THE TELEPORTATION ACCIDENT, was longlisted for the Man Booker Prize and won the Encore Award and a Somerset Maugham Award. He has been chosen by the Culture Show as one of the twelve best new British novelists and by Granta as one of the 20 best British novelists under 40. His work has been translated into more than ten languages. www.nedbeauman.co.ukAuthor: Ned Beauman is one of the most exciting and highly acclaimed writers in the UK today. He was the youngest of Granta's once-a-decade Best of Young British Writers in April 2013; his books have won or been nominated for numerous awards including the Desmond Elliot, Guardian First Book Award and Booker; and he a tireless promoter.His most commerical project yet - Ned's first two novels were historical, involving Nazis; Glow is a conspiracy thriller set in present-day London.Film rights sold to Film 4.Stunning and original jacket approach being developed

London, May 2010. Foxes are behaving oddly. Burmese people are going missing. A new synthetic drug, Glow, has begun to appear on the streets of London. And Raf, a 22-year-old dog-walker suffering from a bizarre sleeping disorder, undercovers a massive corporate conspiracy . . . and falls in love.

Combining the pace, drama and explosive plot twists of a conspiracy thriller with his trademark intellectual, linguistic and comedic pyrotechnics, GLOW is Ned Beauman's most thrilling, virtuosic and compulsively readable novel yet.

Sceptre

The Blazing World

By Siri Hustvedt

LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2014

The artist Harriet Burden, furious at the lack of attention paid her by the New York art world, conducts an experiment: she hides her identity behind three male fronts in a series of exhibitions. Their success seems to prove her point, but there's a sting in the tail - when she unmasks herself, not everyone believes her. Then her last collaborator meets a bizarre end.

In this mesmerising tour de force, Burden's story emerges after her death through a variety of sources, including her (not entirely reliable) journals and the testimonies of her children, lover and a dear friend. Each account is different, however, and the mysteries multiply.

I have told nearly everyone I love - and some random acquaintances - to stop whatever they are doing and read [Hustvedt's] new novel . . . The Blazing World is the playful, ebullient, brainy story of Harriet "Harry" Burden, an artist in her early sixties . . . The book is clearly a feminist undertaking but joyously, unpredictably so. Hustvedt eschews all feminist cliché. She throws herself into rich ambiguities . . . Hustvedt's novels have always been smart, accomplished, critically acclaimed but this one feels like a departure. There is more heat in it, more wildness; it seems to burst on to a whole other level of achievement and grace . . . the book will blaze through the world.This novel is like a palimpsest, built from many paper-tissue thin layers, some more transparent than others, and told through many voices, put together so cleverly it is not clear where the lines are between fact and fiction, let alone between the fictions within the fiction . . . Siri Hustvedt has created a complex world of play and interplay. This novel is a puzzle, a mystery, a dance, filled with intrigue, a truly wonderful intellectual work that makes you think and laugh and tickles the brain.Harry is a lovable, maddening whirlwind . . . The fury is brilliantly done, and so is the love affair Harry embarks on with a fat failed poet . . . Hustvedt writes with a cool precision that can give her work a blistering power . . . The Blazing World is a dazzling novel, the kind that makes you cry (or nearly cry) as well as think.There is a fair amount of anger in the book: feminist anger, but also disdain for journalists, for the art industry, for a gendered world that ignores women like Harriet and rewards men like her husband . . . It might have become shrill in the hands of a lesser writer. As it is, it is at once a story of a privileged Upper East type who bleeds the wounds of Western liberal feminism, and also the universal, deeply affecting story of overshadowed women who are made - or make themselves - small, however big their ambition . . . The Blazing World is a profound and deeply serious book on many levels, but it is most entertaining in its critique of the New York art scene - its vanities, double standards, blind-spots . . . [A novel of] immense soulfulness and wisdomThe richness and playfulness of the novel is down to the way it is structured . . . What is remarkable is the way Hustvedt manages to take her range of intellectual interests and this ostensibly complex format and forge a gripping narrative.It is an exuberantly clever piece of work. Fascinated by disguise, play-acting and ventriloquism, it lures its readers into a maze of characters, viewpoints and apparently persuasive arguments - then insists, refreshingly, that they think their way out . . . There's a central mystery to unravel in The Blazing World, but its real pleasures come from Hustvedt's startling talent for voice and register . . . the narrative becomes a brilliant catfight of dogmas and orthodoxies . . . a novel that gloriously lives up to its title, one blazing with energy and thought.Hustvedt offers a slickly written multiplicity of perspectives . . . The Blazing World ramps up thrillingly as it becomes apparent that Harriet's final collaboration has taken a sinister turn . . . Densely brilliant, but terrifyingly clever . . . But you don't need a PhD in Kierkegaard to enjoy Hustvedt's writing, and it's a pleasure to feel your brain whirring as it forges links and finds the cracks across differing accounts . . . Hustvedt's text is carefully, impressively constructed: she's as convincing in each fictional voice as Harriet is in her masks.Her prose is brilliant, furious, teeming with intelligence and life - an experiment in reception itself.Both intellectually and emotionally gripping . . . the generosity of the storytelling leads to full and often affecting backstories for all the main characters . . . [it] feels like one of those novels in which a well-established author triumphantly sums up, and possibly even surpasses, everything they've done before.Even by Siri Hustvedt's extremely high standards, The Blazing World is an extraordinary book . . . Hustvedt juggles the many voices and many truths masterfully, drawing the reader into an intricate and a puzzling web . . . The precision of the language makes each detail jewel-like and tangible.The devilishly playful, intellectually inspiring, emotionally involving new novel from Siri Hustvedt, longlisted for the Man Booker PrizeLonglisted for the Man Booker Prize 2014Spectacular reception on hardback publication, with review and feature coverage across the board: 'Dazzling' Sunday Times; 'Deeply affecting' Independent; 'Intellectually and emotionally gripping' Spectator; 'Playful, ebullient, brainy' Financial TimesShortlisted for the inaugural Kirkus Fiction Prize 2014Successful Spring 2014 UK tour, including BBC TV News interview, Dublin, Bristol and Hay Festival appearances and London bookshop events.
Sceptre

The Chimes

By Anna Smaill

WINNER OF THE 2016 WORLD FANTASY AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL

MAN BOOKER PRIZE LONGLIST 2015

One to Watch Independent on Sunday

A Bookseller Best Debut of 2015

One to Watch 2015 Huffington Post

An Amazon Rising Star

'The Chimes is a remarkable debut. It's inventive, beautifully written, and completely absorbing. I highly recommend it.' Kevin Powers, author of The Yellow Birds

A mind-expanding literary debut composed of memory, music and imagination.

A boy stands on the roadside on his way to London, alone in the rain.

No memories, beyond what he can hold in his hands at any given moment.

No directions, as written words have long since been forbidden.

No parents - just a melody that tugs at him, a thread to follow. A song that says if he can just get to the capital, he may find some answers about what happened to them.

The world around Simon sings, each movement a pulse of rhythm, each object weaving its own melody, music ringing in every drop of air.

Welcome to the world of The Chimes. Here, life is orchestrated by a vast musical instrument that renders people unable to form new memories. The past is a mystery, each new day feels the same as the last, and before is blasphony.

But slowly, inexplicably, Simon is beginning to remember. He emerges from sleep each morning with a pricking feeling, and sense there is something he urgently has to do. In the city Simon meets Lucien, who has a gift for hearing, some secrets of his own, and a theory about the danger lurking in Simon's past.

A stunning debut composed of memory, music, love and freedom, The Chimes pulls you into a world that will captivate, enthral and inspire.

WINNER OF THE 2016 WORLD FANTASY AWARD FOR BEST NOVEL AND NOMINATED FOR THE 2015 MAN BOOKER PRIZETo call The Chimes striking is I dare say to underplay what might be the most distinctive debut of the decade.SUPERB... intriguing, ambitious and strikingly written.The Chimes is a remarkable debut. It's inventive, beautifully written, and completely absorbing. I highly recommend it.A genuinely originalnovel that has all the tension of a well-told, gripping thriller, but which is elevated well above the ordinary by its shining, lyrical language. The author has created a believable, consistent and vivid world...Cleverly orchestrated and poignantly conveyed throughout.The novel is hypnotic, melancholic and requires concentration, but it builds to an incredibly tense and emotionally satisfying climax that rewards all the effort.Smaill is a former musician with a book of poetry already to her name. The Chimes has strong echoes of both these influences as we're taken on a strange and lyrical journey through a dystopian England . . . The intrinsic links between music and memory suffuse this dreamy narrative . . . the idiosyncratic world [that] Smaill has lovingly created using melodic and musical syntax - her narrative style brimming with invention and nuance.The pleasure lies in getting to grips with the rules of this eerie dystopia and the unusual vocabulary Smaill has minted to describe it.Atmospheric, intensely-imagined strangenessStrangely compellingA dazzling debut piece of fantasy that marries great writing with compelling narrative. And the world Smaill has invented, where memory has been replaced by music and people cling to objects that link them to their pasts, is brilliantly imagined.... a serious book with serious talent behind it.Atmospheric, intensely-imagined strangenessMagical, tender, thought provoking and stunningly imaginative.Dystopian fiction but not quite as we know it... Smaill's particular melodious inventiveness makes her story her own.Anna Smail's ambition fiction debut is a strange, compelling tale; full of musical metaphors and striking imagery, it is wildly imaginative and challenging.An exciting debut, a book full of rhythm, energy and melody... There's no doubt Smaill has created a distinctive and impressive debut, one that dares to create its own music.An enthralling read.lyrical debutThis is a story that rivets us from the beginning but, for those wanting more, there are delicious depths that change an excellent story into an equally excellent thought provoking fable. As if that isn't enough, it also convinces us that Anna is a very clever lady. ... hugely compelling ... Oh yes, this is definitely a 'Wow!' book.

For a story about music, The Chimes is a triumph on the printed page.

Cleverly orchestratedEntrancingly poetic and engagingly plotted, this is a story that brims with heart and soul.LONGLISTED FOR THE 2015 MAN BOOKER PRIZE. A stunning debut composed of memory, music, love and freedom, The Chimes pulls you into a world that will captivate, enthral and inspire.Anna Smaill is a classically trained violinist and published poet. Born in Auckland in 1979, she holds an MA in Creative Writing from the International Institute of Modern Letters (Wellington), an MA in English Literature from the University of Auckland and a PhD in contemporary American poetry from University College London. She is the author of one book of poetry (The Violinist in Spring, VUP 2005) and her poems have been published and anthologised in New Zealand and the United Kingdom. She has lived and worked in both Tokyo and London, and now lives in New Zealand with her husband, novelist Carl Shuker, and their daughter.For fans of Philip Pullman and Susannah ClarkA stunning new voice in literary fiction with huge prize potential
Sceptre

Becoming Steve Jobs

By Brent Schlender, Rick Tetzeli

THE SUNDAY TIMES AND #1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER - with a new foreword by Silicon Valley legend Marc Andreessen.

'For my money, a better book about Jobs than Walter Isaacson's biography' New Yorker

'A fascinating reinterpretation of the Steve Jobs story' Sunday Times

We all think we know who Steve Jobs was, what made him tick, and what made him succeed.

Yet the single most important question about him has never been answered.

The young, impulsive, egotistical genius was ousted in the mid-80s from the company he founded, exiled from his own kingdom and cast into the wilderness. Yet he returned a decade later to transform the ailing Apple into the most successful company the world had ever seen.

How did this reckless upstart transform himself into a visionary business leader?

The first comprehensive study of Jobs' career following his dismissal from Apple, written with unparalleled access and insight, BECOMING STEVE JOBS offers a startling new portrait of the most important business figure in modern history. The most intimate biography yet of Jobs, written by the journalist who knew him better than any other, BECOMING STEVE JOBS draws on recently discovered interviews that have never before seen the light of day, and answers for the first time the most pressing questions about what made this legendary business leader such a success.

'Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli render a spectacular service with this book, giving fresh perspective onSteve Jobs' journey from inspiring but immature entrepreneur into an inspired and mature company-builder. Most important, they capture Jobs' resilience, his refusal to capitulate, his restless drive to stay in the game, his voracious appetite to learn-this, far more than genius, is what made him great.Becoming Steve Jobs gets the focus precisely right: not as a success story, but as a growth story. Riveting, insightful, uplifting-read it and learn!' Jim Collins, author of Good to Great

'BECOMING STEVE JOBS is fantastic. After working with Steve for over 25 years, I feel this book captures with great insight the growth and complexity of a truly extraordinary person. I hope that it will be recognized as the definitive history.' Ed Catmull, President, Pixar and Disney Animation

Exhaustive and moving... full of new informationThis is the insider's guide to Steve Jobs.A fascinating reinterpretation of the Steve Jobs story.The book about Steve Jobs that the world deserves. Smart, accurate, informative, insightful and at times, utterly heartbreaking....Becoming Steve Jobs is going to be an essential reference for decades to come.BECOMING STEVE JOBS is fantastic. After working with Steve for over 25 years, I feel this book captures with great insight the growth and complexity of a truly extraordinary person. I hope that it will be recognized as the definitive history.Steve Jobs is the person who most inspires the new generation of Silicon Valley entrepreneurs. In this deeply-researched book, you'll find the most honest portrait of the real Steve Jobs.Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli render a spectacular service with this book, giving fresh perspective on Steve Jobs' journey from inspiring but immature entrepreneur into an inspired and mature company-builder. Most important, they capture Jobs' resilience, his refusal to capitulate, his restless drive to stay in the game, his voracious appetite to learn-this, far more than genius, is what made him great. Becoming Steve Jobs gets the focus precisely right: not as a success story, but as a growth story. Riveting, insightful, uplifting-read it and learn!One of the best things Brent Schlender and Rick Tetzeli do in writing about Jobs is undoing the 'lone genius' myth, and complicating his persona.Offers a new look into the life of the Apple co-founder... includes a number of interesting anecdotes and perspectives from those who have rarely spoken of their relationships with Jobs over the decades, all tied together by one of the few reporters to have had access to Jobs on a regular basis throughout that time.What makes their book important is that they contend - persuasively, I believe - that . . . [Jobs] was not the same man in his prime that he had been at the beginning of his career. The callow, impetuous, arrogant youth who co-founded Apple was very different from the mature and thoughtful man who returned to his struggling creation and turned it into a company that made breathtaking products while becoming the dominant technology company of our time.

Square would not exist without the work and persistence of Steve Jobs. I am forever grateful. Amazing read.

Highly recommended.Co-authored by Fortune journalist Brent Schlender and Fast Company Executive Editor Rick Tetzeli, and containing exclusive material, this revelatory book will cast an entirely new light on the man behind the most successful company of all time.

Brent Schlender, 58 years old, is one of the `graybeards` of Silicon Valley journalism, having covered the digital revolution almost since it`s inception, including 10 years at The Wall Street Journal, and two decades as FORTUNE`s lead technology writer. He has won numerous writing awards, and in 2010 was named a `Silicon Valley Visionary` by SD Forum, the software industry`s international trade association.

Rick Tetzeli is executive editor of Fast Company. He was Managing Editor of Entertainment Weekly, and Deputy Editor of Fortune. He lives in Brooklyn with his wife, Mari, and their three children.

'A fascinating reinterpretation of the Steve Jobs story' The Sunday Times

'For my money, a better book about Jobs than Walter Isaacson's biography' New Yorker

Becoming Steve Jobs answers, for the first time, the central question about the life and career of the Apple founder and CEO: how did a young man so reckless and arrogant that he was exiled from the company he founded become the most effective and influential business leader of our time?

Revelatory and inspiring, and drawing on extensive new interviews, exclusive access to major figures in Jobs' life and over twenty-five years closely covering the man himself, Becoming Steve Jobs is the most intimate biography yet of this legendary figure.

'Fantastic... I hope that it will be recognized as the definitive history.'
Ed Catmull, President, Pixar and Disney Animation

'Moving [and] full of new information' Independent

'Spectacular ... Riveting, insightful, uplifting - read it and learn!'
Jim Collins, author of Good to Great

Subject: the first and only book to focus on this formative period of Jobs' career, this revelatory book will cast a new light on one of the most influential and enduringly inspiring business legends in history.Authority: endorsed by both Walter Isaacson (author of the international bestselling autobiography of Jobs) and Jobs' familySales: Isaacson's STEVE JOBS sold over 250,000 hardbacks in the UK alone, and broke records abroad.New material: Exclusive, revelatory new material not found in any other biography, and a great publicity hook too: lost interviews discovered years after they were recorded.Considerable international appeal, particularly for business markets (see exclusive territories)
Sceptre

Shame and the Captives

By Thomas Keneally
On the edge of a small Australian town, far from the battlefields of the Second World War, a camp holds thousands of Japanese, Italian and Korean prisoners of war. The locals are unsure how to treat the 'enemy', though Alice Herman, whose young husband is himself a prisoner in Europe, becomes drawn to the Italian soldier sent to work on her father-in-law's farm. The camp commander and his deputy, each concealing a troubled private life, are disunited. And both fatally misread their Japanese captives, who burn with shame at being taken alive. The stage is set for a clash of cultures that has explosive, far-reaching consequences.Keneally skilfully weighs broad cultural questions against the concerns of the soldiers and community . . . In a supremely dramatic ending, it is impossible to guess the fate of any of the characters.His writing is remarkably evocative, whether he is describing everyday occurrences or characters . . . we gain an insight into the minds of the Japanese so even if we don't empathise with their desire for a glorious death, we can comprehend it.A story very suited to Keneally's talent for letting his imagination play on real-life events. The narrative is gripping, slow-moving but absorbing for the first half and more of the novel, then fast-moving, exciting and appalling.Keneally's fine novel gives us insight into how, over time (as in Australia itself), imprisonment, even brutal imprisonment, can evolve into something worthy of the human race.Readers wondering whether there is anything new to be said about the world wars of the twentieth century can pick up one of Keneally's books for a renewed sense of how it felt to live through those terrifying times . . . [he] makes the reader sympathise with the mindset of the prisoners, having rooted out yet another unfamiliar and powerful example of the madness of war.Shame and the Captives suggests that Keneally's late period is as rich as any other in his fifty-year career . . . Keneally's elegant classicism miniaturises grand narratives - here the war in the Pacific - without sacrificing subtlety . . . Shame and the Captives is sobering, horrifying, humane and even strangely uplifting.A tremendously accomplished novel, rich in character, detail and incident. It is the work of a master novelistAs he states in his introduction: "Fiction has always tried to tell the truth by telling lies." On the evidence of this book, and at seventy-eight years of age, Keneally remains one of the most compelling liars on the planet.A dramatic and fascinating novel based on a notorious breakout by Japanese prisoners from an Australian POW camp in 1944, encapsulating the impact of war on ordinary lives.Thomas Keneally began his writing career in 1964 and has published twenty-nine novels since. They include Schindler's Ark, which won the Booker Prize in 1982 and was subsequently made into the film Schindler's List, and The Chant of Jimmie Blacksmith, Confederates and Gossip from the Forest, each of which was shortlisted for the Booker Prize. His most recent novels are The Widow and her Hero, The People's Train and The Daughters of Mars, which was shortlisted for the Walter Scott Prize in 2013. He has also written several works of non-fiction, including his memoir Homebush Boy, Searching for Schindler and Australians. He is married with two daughters and lives in Sydney.Fantastic reviews for the hardback - 'A tremendous, dramatic story...gripping' Scotsman; 'His writing is remarkably evocative' Independent on Sunday; 'The work of a master novelist' Sunday Business PostThe Second World War is a subject of enduring interest to readers and this novel deals with a little-known but significant event - the largest breakout in British military historyKeneally's last novel, THE DAUGHTERS OF MARS (about WW1) has sold more than double his previous one, and renewed interest in his fictionWidely regarded as one of the greatest living Australian novelists, Keneally always gets major coverage in the media

On the edge of a small town in New South Wales, thousands of miles from the battlefields of the Second World War, a prisoner of war camp holds both Italians - largely relieved to be out of the fighting and willing to work on the local farms - and Japanese, so ashamed to have been caught alive that they'd rather die than return home. But they are not the only ones to feel guilty: their chief captor, the English colonel Abercare, is trying to win back his wife following an affair; and Alice Herman, whose husband is himself a POW in Europe, falls in love with the charming Italian assigned to help out on the farm. Then there's Major Suttor, in charge of the Japanese section of the camp, who has as good as abandoned his mentally ill wife.

Abercare and Suttor know that no escaped prisoner would get far, but they fail to grasp the mindset of their Japanese captives. When there is a breakout, they are unprepared, with explosive consequences in the camp, the local community and as far away as Sydney.

Based on a real incident in 1944, this is a dramatic and fascinating tale of clashing cultures, illicit passion, betrayal, honour and shame in many guises.

Sceptre

The Offering

By Grace McCleen

I thought it began the day Father came home without work. Then I thought perhaps it really began the day we arrived at the farm, rumbled up the track, opened the gate and stood looking around as if we had found ourselves in some enchanted land . . .

Something happened on Madeline's fourteenth birthday, something so traumatic that it triggered her mental breakdown. Many years later, she still can't - or perhaps won't - recall the events of that night.

A charismatic new psychiatrist, Dr Lucas, believes he can unlock Madeline's memory by taking her step by step through the preceding year, when her father moved the family to an island he was certain God had guided them to.

Money was short, her mother often unwell and her father a volatile presence. Yet Madeline loved their rural idyll, sensing God in every blade of grass; and when things started to go wrong, she thought she knew how to put them right. But as Dr Lucas unearths the past, it becomes apparent that she was seriously misguided - and that he is treading on very dangerous ground.

Lyrically evoking the rhythms and beauty of the natural world, The Offering is a novel taut with foreboding, a haunting tale of misplaced faith and a heartbreakingly damaged psyche.

Extraordinary...Wonderfully suspenseful and deeply moving, The Offering is full of insights about the nature of madness. It is also keenly observant of the ways in which men play God and the power of the oppressed imagination to create an inhabitable world, even under near-intolerable conditions.That McCleen is a writer of exceptional gifts is beyond doubt. Her prose can soar in moments of breathtaking beauty, most particularly when she turns a poet's eye on the landscape...she writes equally viscerally about her narrator's emotional terrain, depicting claustrophobia, shame and terror so painfully it makes your skin itch.Strange and beautifulGrace McCleen's talent for description, especially when portraying the natural world, is quite exquisiteThe richness with which Madeline describes her febrile younger self contrasts heartbreakingly with the glassy, emotionally neutered life she inhabits now...a bold, mature, terribly sad novel.Impressive, a plausible and moving account of mental illness.Captures the intensity of teenage anguish, and expresses a terrifying estimation of its implications, but it also dares to suggest that God can never be removed from the equation and asks: What is God?There is an eerie sense of foreboding in Grace McCleen's wonderful third novel...Terrific and terrifying.Award-winning author Grace McCleen returns with The Offering, a mesmerising story of innocence corrupted.[McCleen's] vivid representations of the wild environment, loaded with symbolism and a powerful, often sinister spirituality, can bring to mind the poetry of Louise Erdrich, and a sense of fear and foreboding propels the narrative forward. The family's first spring on the island, for example, is described in a single, stunning sentence [...] the denouement will leave you reeling.A stunning novel about faith, innocence and sin, the tale of an unusual rite of passage with terrible consequences by the prize-winning young author of The Land of Decoration.A novel in the vein of Grace McCleen's acclaimed and prize-winning debut, exploring the effect on a young girl of being brought up within a fundamentalist religtion, which has dramatic consequences.Grace McCleen's first novel won the Desmond Elliott Prize and the Betty Trask Award, and was a Richard & Judy selectionTremendous acclaim for her second novel - including high praise from Hilary Mantel - which was shorlisted for the Encore AwardExtremely evocative and well written - the prose style alone should attact critical acclaimStrong autobiographical foundation for the novel will ensure lots of media interest
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After the Bombing

By Clare Morrall
Alma Braithwaite was a teenager in Exeter when her boarding school was bombed in 1942. Twenty-one years later, she remains alone in the house where she grew up, teaching music at her old school, unable to move on from the tragic events of the war. It takes the arrival of an innovative new headmistress and a new pupil - the daughter of a man Alma hasn't seen since 1942 - to bring back the painful yet exhilarating summer that followed the air-raids and jolt her out of the past.Oscillating between World War II and the early Sixties, Morrall sets about evoking the war's enduring impact on those who were left behind on the home front, too young to take part yet irrevocably shaped by it nonetheless . . . an engaging story throughout.A potent evocation of the war on the Home Front and its emotional impact on the young people who survived it . . . as much a tale about identity and survival as it is about the impact of national trauma on individuals . . . Her dedication to authenticity has paid off. The novel resonates with the ageClare Morrall is a writer with a gift for unflamboyant but effective storytelling . . . her narrative has a cumulative powerUnusually emotional and moving . . . You'll fly through it in no time - and love every minute of this deep, engrossing experience.I was enchanted from the very first page. The author's descriptions of war-torn Exeter are so vivid, I felt I was there.By the author of Astonishing Splashes of Colour, an ambitious and moving exploration of the lasting impact of the Second World War.An unusual take on the Second World War, showing its effect on the women who were teenagers during it, many of whom remained unmarried and became teachers.The novel also highlights a lesser-known event of the war - the Baedeker raids, which killed many and badly damaged five cathedral cities of no strategic importance, picked by Hitler because they had the most stars in the Baedeker guide.Clare Morrall's first novel was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize and her fourth was a TV Book Club Summer Read.Should appeal to fans of William Boyd's Restless, Sarah Waters' The Night Watch and Atonement.
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The Bone Clocks

By David Mitchell

Metaphysical thriller, meditation on mortality and chronicle of our self-devouring times, this is the kaleidoscopic new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas.

SHORTLISTED FOR THE NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS UK AUTHOR OF THE YEAR 2014
LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2014
LONGLISTED FOR THE FOLIO PRIZE 2015

One drowsy summer's day in 1984, teenage runaway Holly Sykes encounters a strange woman who offers a small kindness in exchange for 'asylum'. Decades will pass before Holly understands exactly what sort of asylum the woman was seeking . . .

The Bone Clocks follows the twists and turns of Holly's life from a scarred adolescence in Gravesend to old age on Ireland's Atlantic coast as Europe's oil supply dries up - a life not so far out of the ordinary, yet punctuated by flashes of precognition, visits from people who emerge from thin air and brief lapses in the laws of reality. For Holly Sykes - daughter, sister, mother, guardian - is also an unwitting player in a murderous feud played out in the shadows and margins of our world, and may prove to be its decisive weapon.

A globe-trotting, mind-bending, hair-raising triumph.He is funny, hip and full of life. Which other writer could match his witty elision of fiction and science, of sense and nonsense? This beautiful explosion of adventurous ideas may well take him, finally, beyond the Booker shortlist.If only real life were as elegant and generally encouraging as a Mitchell novel! He writes with scintillating verve and abundance.Every page fizzes with energy and humour. Wildly imaginative and truly magical, this is a big, chunky feast of a book.Intellectually rigorous and stunningly imaginative . . . a rich and dense, inventive and witty thriller which, if you enjoyed Cloud Atlas and Mitchell's other works will leave you completely spellboundDazzling.Dazzling . . . Mitchell's heavy arsenal of talents is showcased in these pages: his symphonic imagination; his ventriloquist's ability to channel the voices of myriad characters from different time zones and cultures; his intuitive understanding of children and knack for capturing their solemnity and humor; and his ear for language - its rhythms, sounds and inflections.For its experimentation, humour, hybrid energy, and sheer narrative pleasure, The Bone Clocks compels admiration.No one, clearly, has ever told Mitchell that the novel is dead. He writes with a furious intensity and slapped-awake vitality, with a delight in language and all the rabbit holes of experienceMitchell's mesmerizing saga is evidence of the power of story to transport us, and even to stop time entirely.[The Bone Clocks] has finally descended incarnate from the mind of this divinely inventive author . . . This new novel offers up a rich selection of domestic realism, gothic fantasy and apocalyptic speculation, stretching around the world from the Margaret Thatcher era of the 1980s to the Endarkenment of 2043 . . . Some of these narrators are moving and sympathetic; others radiate the metastasizing creepiness of a Patricia Highsmith villain. Their stories evolve in subtly distinctive tones and formsMitchell is a consummate craftsman . . . For sci-fi fantasists, the imaginary world Mitchell creates might be a thing of wonder, a Dungeons and Dragons for literate grown-ups. For others, I suspect the flesh and blood anguish of a long life lived well against the odds will prove the greater pleasure.With The Bone Clocks, Mitchell rises to meet and match the legacy of Cloud Atlas . . . interconnected lives stretch across time; human contact is both frightening and vital. This novel electrifyingly unites Mitchell's fictions into one universe while telling the story of Holly Sykes, an ordinary young woman whose chance encounters give her life meaning.One of the most entertaining and thrilling novels I've read in a long time. Much of the entertainment comes from Mitchell's mastery over what feels like the entire world and all its inhabitants. Time keeps pulsing ahead in The Bone Clocks, and Mitchell pushes his cast of characters into the future, ending the book in a terrifying world. But for all the dystopia, and the mysticism, and the wild and clanging noise, and the flights of invention that have taken place in this extraordinary fun house of a novel, Mitchell's novel-writing rules allow him to retain his great sensitivity toward his main character from start to finish.Mitchell's new novel almost manages to make the rest of his work look hidebound and provincial . . . Mitchell is writing about a mortal among immortals, and he never abandons the human half of the story: the fell swoop of first love, the labyrinth of silence where unhappy couples live, the clear cut inside a parent when a child goes missing, the chasm between frontline and home front in a nation at war . . . I was undone by the endingIs The Bone Clocks the most ambitious novel ever written, or just the most Mitchell-esque? . . . From gritty realism to far-out fantasy, each section has its own charm and surprises. With its wayward thoughts, chance meetings, and attention to detail, Mitchell's novel is a thing of beauty.Another exacting, challenging and deeply rewarding novel from logophile and time-travel master Mitchell . . . If Thatcher's 1984 is bleak, then get a load of what awaits us in 2030. Speculative, lyrical and unrelentingly dark - trademark Mitchell, in other words.If David Mitchell isn't the most talented novelist of his generation, is there any doubt that he is the most multi-talented? He is, at his best, a superior writer to Jonathan Franzen, a better storyteller than Michael Chabon, more wickedly clever than Jennifer Egan, nearly as fluent as Junot Diaz in multiple dialects, and as gifted as Alice Munro . . . [The Bone Clocks] offers everything you could possibly want from a conjurer at the height of his powers - a ludicrously ambitious, unstoppably clever epic told through a chorus of diverse narrators that is both outrageous in scope and meticulous in execution . . . The Bone Clocks affords its readers the singular gift of reading - the wish to stay put and to be nowhere else but here.With 600 pages of metafictional shenanigans in relentlessly brilliant prose, The Bone Clocks hits lots of hot buttons, from the horrors of the Iraq war to the Eternal Battle of Good and Evil to the near-future downfall of our civilisation . . . Death is at the heart of this novel. And there lies its depth and darkness, bravely concealed with all the wit and sleight of hand and ventriloquistic verbiage and tale-telling bravura of which Mitchell is a master . . . It's a whopper of a story.I was completely blown away . . . Mitchell's first-class imagination delivers a complex and exciting premise that transcends into an incredibly explosive, surprising, intelligent, dark and magical story.At once a gripping thriller and a far-out fantasy, a brilliant mash-up that pulsates with energy, satire and wit.If I could file a review that consisted only of the word "wow" 900 times over, it still wouldn't quite capture my delirious response to David Mitchell's stunning, funny, sad, prophetic, fantastical, satirical, achingly real and gloriously fictitious new novel.It's massively bold and ambitious, but also thoroughly readable, funny and moving.Our most accomplished inventor of multitudinous worlds, which are filled with complex, vital people . . . The Bone Clocks features a gyre-works inventiveness that's well matched by (bizarrely) cerebral substance . . . his most sinewy, fine and full book to date, a Mobius strip-tripping great novel that will reward bleary-eyed rereadingThe overwhelming impression is of an author at the height of his powers precisely because of a deep and intuitive understanding and curiosity of what it is about to live a life as a human being.Something truly fantastical: an epic in many voices featuring supernatural beings, rips in reality and a global battle between good and evil. Yet Mitchell's superlative prose makes this much more than a tall tale: the novel also takes in family love and loss, the wars in Afghanistan and Iraq and a horribly plausible near-future in which the end of oil is catapulting the world towards barbarism . . . It's a globe-trotting, mind-bending, hair-raising triumph, already sitting pretty on the Booker longlist.As his oeuvre develops, he seems to be getting cleverer, braver and delightfully madder . . . In the wrong hands, magical storytelling like this would make you cringe. But in Mitchell's it thrills. He is funny, hip and full of life. Which other writer could match his witty elision of fiction and science, of sense and nonsense? This beautiful explosion of adventurous ideas may well take him, finally, beyond the Booker shortlist.If only real life were as elegant and generally encouraging as a Mitchell novel! He writes with scintillating verve and abundance. The joyful, consoling world of Mitchell is the world of childhood, where the parameters between reality and fantasy are fluid; the overall effect is like literary regression therapy for adults who have been whipped and abused by real life.Mitchell has a vigorous, shape-shifting imagination, and his pen tracks his thoughts with extraordinary agility. Moving from place to place, time to time, he can summon up a setting in a line . . . for its experimentation, humour, hybrid energy, and sheer narrative pleasure, The Bone Clocks compels admiration.If I could file a review that consisted only of the word "wow" 900 times over, it still wouldn't quite capture my delirious response to David Mitchell's stunning, funny, sad, prophetic, fantastical, satirical, achingly real and gloriously fictitious new novel.When a writer creates a world in which centuries-dead reincarnated souls are at war - and makes it entirely believable - you know you're in the hands of a master . . . Every page fizzes with energy and humour. Wildly imaginative and truly magical, this is a big, chunky feast of a bookWith 600 pages of metafictional shenanigans in relentlessly brilliant prose, The Bone Clocks hits lots of hot buttons, from the horrors of the Iraq war to the Eternal Battle of Good and Evil to the near-future downfall of our civilisation . . . Death is at the heart of this novel. And there lies its depth and darkness, bravely concealed with all the wit and sleight of hand and ventriloquistic verbiage and tale-telling bravura of which Mitchell is a master . . . It's a whopper of a story.Intellectually rigorous and stunningly imaginative . . . a rich and dense, inventive and witty thriller which, if you enjoyed Cloud Atlas and Mitchell's other works will leave you completely spellboundI was completely blown away . . . Mitchell's first-class imagination delivers a complex and exciting premise that transcends into an incredibly explosive, surprising, intelligent, dark and magical story.Mitchell's mesmerizing saga is evidence of the power of story to transport us, and even to stop time entirely.At once a gripping thriller and a far-out fantasy, a brilliant mash-up that pulsates with energy, satire and wit.It's massively bold and ambitious, but also thoroughly readable, funny and moving.Mitchell is a consummate craftsman . . . For sci-fi fantasists, the imaginary world Mitchell creates might be a thing of wonder, a Dungeons and Dragons for literate grown-ups. For others, I suspect the flesh and blood anguish of a long life lived well against the odds will prove the greater pleasure.No one, clearly, has ever told Mitchell that the novel is dead. He writes with a furious intensity and slapped-awake vitality, with a delight in language and all the rabbit holes of experience . . . Very few [writers] excite the reader about both the visceral world and the visionary one as Mitchell doesOur most accomplished inventor of multitudinous worlds, which are filled with complex, vital people . . . The Bone Clocks features a gyre-works inventiveness that's well matched by (bizarrely) cerebral substance . . . his most sinewy, fine and full book to date, a Mobius strip-tripping great novel that will reward bleary-eyed rereadingIf David Mitchell isn't the most talented novelist of his generation, is there any doubt that he is the most multi-talented? He is, at his best, a superior writer to Jonathan Franzen, a better storyteller than Michael Chabon, more wickedly clever than Jennifer Egan, nearly as fluent as Junot Diaz in multiple dialects, and as gifted as Alice Munro . . . [The Bone Clocks] offers everything you could possibly want from a conjurer at the height of his powers - a ludicrously ambitious, unstoppably clever epic told through a chorus of diverse narrators that is both outrageous in scope and meticulous in execution . . . The Bone Clocks affords its readers the singular gift of reading - the wish to stay put and to be nowhere else but here.Dazzling . . . Mitchell's heavy arsenal of talents is showcased in these pages: his symphonic imagination; his ventriloquist's ability to channel the voices of myriad characters from different time zones and cultures; his intuitive understanding of children and knack for capturing their solemnity and humor; and his ear for language - its rhythms, sounds and inflections.With The Bone Clocks, Mitchell rises to meet and match the legacy of Cloud Atlas . . . interconnected lives stretch across time; human contact is both frightening and vital. This novel electrifyingly unites Mitchell's fictions into one universe while telling the story of Holly Sykes, an ordinary young woman whose chance encounters give her life meaning.[The Bone Clocks] has finally descended incarnate from the mind of this divinely inventive author . . . This new novel offers up a rich selection of domestic realism, gothic fantasy and apocalyptic speculation, stretching around the world from the Margaret Thatcher era of the 1980s to the Endarkenment of 2043 . . . Some of these narrators are moving and sympathetic; others radiate the metastasizing creepiness of a Patricia Highsmith villain. Their stories evolve in subtly distinctive tones and formsMitchell's new novel almost manages to make the rest of his work look hidebound and provincial . . . Mitchell is writing about a mortal among immortals, and he never abandons the human half of the story: the fell swoop of first love, the labyrinth of silence where unhappy couples live, the clear cut inside a parent when a child goes missing, the chasm between frontline and home front in a nation at war . . . I was undone by the endingOne of the most entertaining and thrilling novels I've read in a long time. Much of the entertainment comes from Mitchell's mastery over what feels like the entire world and all its inhabitants. Time keeps pulsing ahead in The Bone Clocks, and Mitchell pushes his cast of characters into the future, ending the book in a terrifying world. But for all the dystopia, and the mysticism, and the wild and clanging noise, and the flights of invention that have taken place in this extraordinary fun house of a novel, Mitchell's novel-writing rules allow him to retain his great sensitivity toward his main character from start to finish.Is The Bone Clocks the most ambitious novel ever written, or just the most Mitchell-esque? . . . From gritty realism to far-out fantasy, each section has its own charm and surprises. With its wayward thoughts, chance meetings, and attention to detail, Mitchell's novel is a thing of beauty.Another exacting, challenging and deeply rewarding novel from logophile and time-travel master Mitchell . . . If Thatcher's 1984 is bleak, then get a load of what awaits us in 2030. Speculative, lyrical and unrelentingly dark - trademark Mitchell, in other words.The dazzling new novel from the author of Cloud Atlas, at once the kaleidoscopic story of an unusual woman's life, a metaphysical thriller and a profound meditation on mortality and survival.

David Mitchell is one of the most acclaimed authors of his generation - 'Just about the most audacious, thrilling and, above all, entertaining young British novelist there is' (Observer). He has been shortlisted twice for the Man Booker Prize and longlisted four times, as well as won the John Llewellyn Rhys, Geoffrey Faber Memorial and South Bank Show Literature Prizes, and the Richard & Judy Best Read. He was also selected as one of Granta's Best Young British Novelists in 2003 and named by Time as one of the world's 100 most influential people in 2007. His previous novels are Ghostwritten, number9dream, Cloud Atlas, which was adapted for film in 2012, Black Swan Green and The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet.

In 2013, The Reason I Jump: One Boy's Voice From the Silence of Autism by Naoki Higashida was published in a translation from the Japanese by David Mitchell and KA Yoshida. It was an immediate bestseller in the UK and later in the US as well. The Bone Clocks is David Mitchell's sixth novel.

One of the very few authors whose new book is an eventTo be backed by huge publicity and marketing campaignGroundbreaking partnership with Twitter, and with Guardian, pre- and on publicationInterviews on national TV, radio, in print and online across the boardBig venue author tour in September and NovemberEyecatching ad campaignRe-reading backlist campaign through the summerReissue of backlist with beautiful new covers
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Adult Onset

By Ann-Marie MacDonald

'Ann-Marie MacDonald captures the dark hilarity of parenthood like nobody else. I gulped down Adult Onset in a single day.' Emma Donoghue, author of Room

A NUMBER ONE BESTSELLER IN CANADA

Mary Rose McKinnon has two children with her partner Hilary and a fractured relationship with her mother Dolly; she also has issues with anger management and lives in fear of hurting the children and these feelings seem somehow rooted in a part of her childhood she has trouble remembering.

Is Dolly - the kind of big personality who makes all Mary Rose's friends, and even waiters in coffee shops, exclaim 'I love your Mum!' - really harbouring a dark secret about what caused Mary Rose's childhood injuries, and is Mary Rose doomed to follow the same path with her own children?

ADULT ONSET is a heartbreaking, hilarious, hugely satisfying novel about family ties and the joy and agony of parenthood. Ann-Marie MacDonald gets under the reader's skin and gives voice to the feelings we have all experienced but may never have examined.

Beautifully rendered... frank and acidly funny... It's a large-hearted, resonant novel, filled with an interiority that opens out - a generous work.Sensitive and unmistakeably heartfeltDefinitely recommendedA complex, troubling novel that cuts with surgical precision into the sinew and muscle of family life.Big, troubling and brave.Ann-Marie MacDonald captures the dark hilarity of parenthood like nobody else. I gulped down Adult Onset in a single day....explores the question of parental abuse and its origins with uncommon courage.She has again delivered a masterpiece.A lively, moving, and often funny story that has the potential to help usher in a new era of honest literary depictions of families in all their permutations.. . . a novel impossible to put down once begun. . . . the novel is superb, a fine blending of fact and fiction, of remembered incident and forgotten history, a wonderfully written treatise on the power of the past to impinge on the present.Ms. MacDonald strikes just the right tone as she exposes the brutal undercurrents of domestic life.. . . an intricate, gripping novel that is also a master class in turning the personal into the universal through art.Many of us will see ourselves in the profound discomfort MacDonald has conjured... the book is an absolute triumph of terrifying authenticity.Suspense builds; surely, horror awaits. . . . Macdonald's book remains spellbinding throughout. It is impossible to forget.Remarkable...an engrossing, disturbing and layered tale.[MacDonald's] prose...is always right and true, clean and penetrating.One of the finest novels I've read in a long, long time.MacDonald is a stunningly good writer . . . The Way the Crow Flies . . . secures for MacDonald a place, forever, in Canadian literature.Macdonald is excellent at conversation - the phonecalls between Mary Rose and her mother are superb in their accuracyHeartbreaking new novel from the internationally bestselling author of Fall on Your Knees and The Way the Crow FliesAnn-Marie MacDonald is a bestselling, award-winning novelist, playwright, actor and broadcaster. She lives in Toronto with her partner and their 2 children.Ann-Marie MacDonald's first novel, Fall on Your Knees, won the 1997 Commonwealth Writers Prize for Best First Novel, was selected for Oprah's Book Club and was a New York Times bestseller.Her second novel, The Way the Crow Flies, was shortlisted for the 2003 Giller Prize. Both were critical and commercial successes in the UK.Promotable author who is a literary star in Canada.Strong contender for Bailey's Prize for Fiction.For fans of Lionel Shriver, Barbara Kingsolver and Jane Smiley.
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The Reason I Jump: one boy's voice from the silence of autism

By Naoki Higashida, David Mitchell, Keiko Yoshida

The No. 1 Sunday Times and New York Times bestseller.

Written by Naoki Higashida when he was only thirteen, this remarkable book provides a rare insight into the often baffling behaviour of autistic children. Using a question and answer format, Naoki explains things like why he talks loudly or repeats the same questions, what causes him to have panic attacks, and why he likes to jump. He also shows the way he thinks and feels about his world - other people, nature, time and beauty, and himself. Abundantly proving that people with autism do possess imagination, humour and empathy, he also makes clear how badly they need our compassion, patience and understanding.

David Mitchell and his wife have translated Naoki's book so that it might help others dealing with autism and generally illuminate a little-understood condition. It gives us an exceptional chance to enter the mind of another and see the world from a strange and fascinating perspective.

The book also features eleven original illustrations, inspired by Naoki's words, by the artistic duo Kai and Sunny.

An extraordinary account of how autism feels from the inside.The most remarkable book of the year. The book throws a pontoon bridge over the chasm dividing autistic and neuro-typical experience.The Reason I Jump reads effortlessly, each page challenging preconceptions that autistic people lack empathy, humour or imagination.This is a wonderful book. I defy anyone not to be captivated, charmed and uplifted by it. But above all, you will never feel the same about autism again.The freshness of voice coexists with so much wisdom . . . it will stretch your vision of what it is to be human.[The Reason I Jump] has been impossible to forget.The No. 1 Sunday Times and internationally bestselling account of life as an autistic child. 'Brilliant . . . both moving and strangely optimistic' (Daily Telegraph).

Naoki Higashida was born in Kimitsu, Japan in 1992. He was diagnosed with autism in 1998 and subsequently attended a school for students with special needs, then (by correspondence) Atmark Cosmopolitan High School, graduating in 2011. Having learnt to use a method of communication based on an alphabet grid, Naoki wrote The Reason I Jump when he was thirteen and it was published in Japan in 2007. He has published several books since, from autobiographical accounts about living with autism to fairy tales, poems and illustrated books, and writes a regular blog. Despite his communication challenges, he also gives presentations about life on the autistic spectrum throughout Japan and works to raise awareness about autism. In 2011 he appeared in director Gerry Wurzburg's documentary on the subject, Wretches & Jabberers.

David Mitchell is the author of the novels Ghostwritten, number9dream, Cloud Atlas, Black Swan Green and The Thousand Autumns of Jacob de Zoet. He has been shortlisted twice for the Man Booker Prize and won several awards for his writing. KA Yoshida was born in Yamaguchi, Japan, and specialised in English Poetry at Notre Dame Seishin University.

A No.1 Sunday Times bestseller, as well as a New York Times bestsellerPublished to huge acclaim and selected as a BBC Radio 4 Book of the WeekExceptional reader response on Amazon, Mumsnet, BBC Radio's blog and social media.Selected as a book of the year in the Spectator, Evening Standard, Sunday Times, Observer, Mail on Sunday and Metro.Shortlisted for Independent Booksellers Week Book Award 2014.Selected for Waterstones Book Club
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The Walker's Guide to Outdoor Clues and Signs

By Tristan Gooley

'Even the intrepid Bear Grylls could learn a trick or two from this book' The Times

The ultimate guide to what the land, sun, moon, stars, trees, plants, animals, sky and clouds can reveal - when you know what to look for.

Includes over 850 outdoor clues and signs.

This top ten bestseller is the result of Tristan Gooley's two decades of pioneering outdoors experience and six years of instructing, researching and writing. It includes lots of outdoor clues and signs that will not be found in any other book in the world.

As well as the most comprehensive guide to natural navigation for walkers ever compiled, it also contains clues for weather forecasting, tracking, city walks, coast walks, night walks and dozens of other areas.

In terms of sheer did-you-knows per page it is one of the richest, densest, most rewarding books on nature I have read in a long time...its joy in deduction is infectiously delightful.Learning so much in The Walker's Guide, the new book from Tristan Gooley, that I might have to take another long walk ...I for one will never look at the British countryside in quite the same way again.Gooley can show the most moonstruck how to interpret their surroundings. Even the intrepid Bear Grylls could learn a trick or two from this book.Anyone interested in walking out of doors at any time would be well advised to read this excellent book.As with his earlier, equally important The Natural Navigator , this text is densely packed with information, engagingly and clearly written ... Every outdoor-lover should have at least one Tristan Gooley book in their library. He's attained national treasure status, as useful and educative as he is endearingly unique.THE WALKER'S GUIDE to the outdoor clues and signs, their meaning and the art of making predictions and deductions offers the chance to turn every walk into a rewarding game of detection.TV appearances include BBC1 Country Tracks and BBC2 All Roads Lead Nowhere BBC2 with Alison Steadman, Sue Perkins and Stephen Mangan.Tristan Gooley is Vice Chairman of the UK's largest independent travel company, Trailfinders.His first book, THE NATURAL NAVIGATOR has sold more than 16,000 HB copies through bookscan and more than 6,500 PB copies.
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Hidden Knowledge

By Bernardine Bishop

'Outdoes Muriel Spark and Evelyn Waugh' Margaret Drabble, Observer

Accused of child abuse, Father Roger Tree confesses at once; it masks a darker secret. Meanwhile his sister Romola faces a future without their beloved brother, the novelist Hereward Tree. Can she live with the ending of his last book? And then there is Hereward's much younger lover, Carina, who takes fate into her own hands. But it is Betty Winterborne, forced to re-examine the death of her son Mark twenty years before, who has the courage to face the truth.

There are the lies we tell others, and the lies we tell ourselves. This is a story about the difference.

An extraordinarily brave and powerful novel . . . one that pins down the darker aspects of human experience with a precision beyond most writers.Remarkable and surprising . . . outdoes Muriel Spark and Evelyn Waugh in high Catholic comedy . . . The plot is brilliantly articulated: storylines present with effortless and enviable ease,minor characters are a delight . . . Bishop had long been fascinated by the concept of the "impossible moral conundrum", the day of reckoning, and here she has created one that keeps us in suspense to the last moment. She resolves it with a tragic humanity and wit.A testament to deft storytellingBishop relishes coincidence and the unexpected quirks of fate . . . [with] a welcome lightness and sense of irony

Praise for UNEXPECTED LESSONS IN LOVE:
It's impossible to recommend the late Bernardine Bishop's wondrous book too highly

Bishop treats a fearful subject with an extraordinary lightness of touch; her humour and her emotional wisdom make this a delightful and humane novel.This novel, wise, sharp and startlingly frank, distils a lifetime of reflection on the rules of attraction, affection - and family life. From confused youth to the ordeals and confusions of old age, her wry insights delight.A wonderful novel, one of those rare books which leaves the reader with a deeper understanding of the human heart . . . This is an author of exceptional intelligence, subtlety and warmth. Expect to hear the name Bernardine Bishop when the lists for the Costa and Man Booker prizes are complied this year.This novel should appeal to Joanna Trollope fans . . . Bishop is a fine, intelligent writer, capable of handling moral and philosophical themes with a light touch.From the author of the acclaimed UNEXPECTED LESSONS IN LOVE - 'impossible to recommend more highly' GuardianThe great-granddaughter of the poet Alice Meynell, Bernardine Bishop was the youngest witness in the Lady Chatterley trial in 1960. After writing two early novels, she taught in a London comprehensive school for ten years and then had a distinguished career as a psychotherapist, during which she brought up her two sons. Cancer forced her retirement in 2010 and she returned to her first love, fiction. Bernardine Bishop lived in London with her husband, until her death in July 2013.Has all the wit of Marina Lewycka, the brilliant observation of Jane Gardam and the bittersweet charm of Mary WesleyWill also appeal to readers of Major Pettigrew's Last Stand and The Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie SocietyUNEXPECTED LESSONS IN LOVE was shortlisted for the 2013 Costa Novel of the Year Award
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Visitation Street

By Ivy Pochoda

Summer in Red Hook, Brooklyn, a blue collar neighbourhood where hipster gourmet supermarkets push against tired housing projects, and the East River opens into the bay. Bored and listless, fifteen-year-old June and Val are looking for some fun. Forget the boys, the bottles, the coded whistles. Val wants to do something wild and a little crazy: take a raft out onto the bay.

But out on the water, as the bright light of day gives way to darkness, the girls disappear. Only Val will survive, washed ashore semi-conscious in the weeds.

June's shocking disappearance will reverberate in the lives of a diverse cast of Red Hook residents. Fadi, the Lebanese bodega owner, trolls for information about the crime. Cree, just beginning to pull it together after his father's murder, unwittingly makes himself the chief suspect - although an elusive guardian seems to have other plans for him. As Val emerges from the shadow of her missing friend, her teacher Jonathan, Juilliard drop-out and barfly, will be forced to confront a past riddled with tragic sins of omission.

In VISITATION STREET, Ivy Pochoda combines intensely vivid prose with breathtaking psychological insight to explore a cast of solitary souls, pulled by family, love, and betrayal, who yearn for a chance to escape, no matter the cost.

Gritty and magical, filled with mystery, poetry and pain, Ivy Pochoda's voice recalls Richard Price, Junot Diaz, and even Alice Sebold, yet it's indelibly her own.A powerfully beautiful novelVISITATION STREET explores a community's response to tragedy with crystalline prose, a dose of the uncanny, and an unblinking eye for both human frailty and resilience. Pochoda's vivid portrait of grief, hope, and redemption lends power to the small moments of grace and beauty that may be found in the wake of loss. Marvellous.Skilful... nuanced... Ms. Pochoda aspires to join female suspense novelists - among them, Tana French, Laura Lippman and Kate Atkinson - who are arguably writing more serious genre fiction than their male counterparts.VISITATION STREET immersed me completely in the neighbourhood of Red Hook, and brought its inhabitants to life in a beautiful, haunting, and thought-provoking crime novel. Ivy Pochoda brings forth the full palette of human emotions in this gripping urban drama, a story that hurts you on one page and gives you hope on the next. A marvellous novel.Intoxicating. . . . Reading VISITATION STREET, imbued as it is with mystery and danger, I am utterly convinced that Pochoda is herself a medium, capable of communicating across boundaries real and imagined, across noisy courtyards and over rough waves. She is simply too good at hearing voices--and sharing them--for that not to be the case.Worth seeking out... a writer to watchA terrific story in the vein of Dennis Lehane's fiction.The dealings with the tragedy within the first few chapters, reminded me so much of Twin Peaks . . . with Pochoda's clever prose, it soon becomes evident that between each of the characters there lays a gulf of isolation . . . Pochoda's prose and storytelling skill has managed with a clear and beautiful tact, to turn the town of Red Hook into the most fascinating character within the book. This makes the story both enchanting and tangible.Pochoda's use of third person multiple point of view serves to paint a unique portrait of a community drawn together and pulled apart by grief, while at the same time creating a fully realized emotional arc for each primary character. In another turn from the traditions of the mystery genre, the novel's thick description and lush prose invite readers to steep in the heady elixir of the dockside neighborhood.Utterly compelling literary crime from a major new voice.Ivy Pochoda grew up in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn and lived in Red Hook for several years. She is the author of The Art of Disappearing. A former professional squash player, she lives in Los Angeles with her husband.Stunning new literary voice reminiscent of Gillian Flynn or Alice Sebold.Getting extraordinary advance reviews from Dennis Lehane, Deborah Harkness and others.Will appeal to fans of The Wire.
Sceptre

The Gallery of Vanished Husbands

By Natasha Solomons

At thirty a woman has a directness in her eye. Juliet Montague did anyhow. She knew exactly what she wanted. She wanted to buy a refrigerator.

But in a rash moment, Juliet commissions a portrait of herself instead. She has been closeted by her conservative Jewish community for too long, ever since her husband disappeared. Now she is ready to be seen.

So begins the journey of a suburban wife and mother into the heart of '60s London and its thriving art world, where she proves an astute spotter of talent. Yet she remains an outsider: drawn to a reclusive artist who never leaves Dorset and unable to feel free until she has tracked down her husband - a quest that leads to California and a startling discovery.

Captivates you with its charm, quirkiness and old-fashioned storytellingThis charming, mesmerising story is ultimately about the triumph of the human spirit, not the caging of it . . . Solomons has created a warm, luscious read that brims with passion and skilfully evokes a bygone era when only married women could be prescribed the Pill, when the sexual revolution was just beginning and when children were cheerfully given cherry brandy as a "sleeping draught". It is a beautifully written tale about a woman who was left socially dead but rose again by seizing life.The Gallery of Vanished Husbands is a colourful and captivating tale of a woman shedding her skin.Natasha Solomons typically binds her themes with her gift as a storyteller. Many times I had to stop and gasp for air at some incredible revelation. But mostly this is a portrait of a woman. Solomons doesn't tell us Juliet is beautiful, but you know she is from the way her head and heart behave and the way the men in her orbit adore her.This brilliant novel is infused with empathy and humour. I adored it.A luminous book - passionate, rich and touching.The loose and liberated art world of the 1960s in the setting for The Gallery of Vanished Husbands, a charming tale by Natasha Solomons. After having her portrait painted, a newly abandoned wife breaks free from her uptight upbringing to find a new love and life.Solomons creates in Juliet a detailed character portrait of a woman who exhibits strength and poise under less than ideal conditions. Each chapter tells the story of one of Juliet's paintings and of important events in her life, and readers will respond to the realistic and beautifully flawed characteristics assigned to her.The entrancing new novel by the author of the international bestsellers Mr Rosenblum's List and The Novel in the Viola.Natasha Solomons is the author of the internationally bestselling Mr Rosenblum's List, The Novel in the Viola, which was chosen for the Richard & Judy Book Club, and The Gallery of Vanished Husbands. Natasha lives in Dorset with her son and her husband with whom she also writes screenplays. Her novels have been translated into 17 languages.A joy to read, full of warmth, quirky humour and poignancy - a perfect summer read for fans of The Unlikely Pilgrimage of Harold Fry and A Short History of Tractors in Ukrainian.National press advertising and ads across women's lifestyle sites.Pop-up author events throughout the summer.Reading group campaign.THE NOVEL IN THE VIOLA was a Richard & Judy Summer Read as well as a New York Times bestseller. MR ROSENBLUM'S LIST was shortlisted for the Galaxy Awards.

By the author of the international bestseller MR ROSENBLUM`S LIST, the captivating story of the life and loves of a woman who breaks free of her strict Jewish upbringing and joins the world of art and artists in sixties London.

Raised by strict Jewish parents in suburban Kent in the 1930s and 40s, Juliet Montague has never rebelled against her upbbringing, even when her husband disappears, which in her tight-knit community means that until he is traced, she cannot have anything to do with another man. But on her 30th birthday, on her way to buy the fridge she has scrimped for, she impulsively decides to spend her savings on a painting by a young artist, who persuades her to let him paint a portrait of herself instead. 

The portrait, the first in a series by various artists that punctuates Juliet`s life, marks the beginning of a tricky, exciting and guilt-ridden path as she juggles being a mother and dutiful daughter with the allure of London`s art world in the sixties. She proves a skilful spotter of new talent, but also susceptible to an intriguingly reclusive artist who never leaves Dorset. The more she becomes involved with him and the further she is drawn from her roots, the more important it becomes to track her husband down - a quest which will take her to California.   


Natasha Solomons was born in 1980. Her first job, aged nine, was as a shepherdess, minding the flock on Bulbarrow hill. Since then, she has worked as a screenwriter with her husband, and they are currently working on the adaptation of MR ROSENBLUM`S LIST. She is also researching a PhD in eighteenth-century poetry. She lives in Dorset.

Sceptre

The House of Rumour

By Jake Arnott

A mind-bending, thrilling journey into 20th-century history and outer space - 'a brightly coloured portrait of our times that is alternatively intimate and epic . . . brilliant' (Independent on Sunday).

In 1941, Larry Zagorski was a naïve young writer of science-fiction. Seven decades on, he looks back on that crucial year and traces his place in a mysterious web - one that connects the Second World War with the Space Age, stretches from London to Cuba and Southern California, and links Ian Fleming with Rudolf Hess in a conspiracy that reverberates in the present.

Could this be the secret history of the 20th century? In a mesmerising novel peopled by spies and propagandists, the conned and the heartbroken, dreamers and fanatics, the question is: who will you believe?

It may be the ideal holiday read for those who like to take their brains with them on vacation.Highly entertaining and perhaps even mind-expanding, Arnott's high-class conjuring act shows that truth really is stranger than fiction.A supremely intelligent book as well as a surprisingly warm one.Arnott offers a brightly coloured portrait of our times that is alternatively intimate and epic...The House of Rumour is a brilliant achievement that invites repeated readingsIf this is that dark Prince Arnott's Jonbar Hinge, the future looks bright.A potent mix of fact and fiction that takes on 20th-century history but remains a page-turnerThe House of Rumour is a page-turner with exceptional style, depth, thought, camp, counter-history and intrigue. It's both sci-fi/fantasy pulp and an ambitiously epic work of cosmic proportions: a welcome paradox of a novel that boldly toys with the boundaries between high and low-brow art.It isn't a book, it's a revelation.A mind-bending, thrilling journey into 20th-century history and outer space - 'a brightly coloured portrait of our times that is alternatively intimate and epic . . . brilliant' (Independent on Sunday).Born in 1961, Jake Arnott lives in London. His first novel, The Long Firm, was a major critical and popular success. It was subsequently made into a BBC TV series, which was nominated for two BAFTA awards. His second novel, He Kills Coppers, was also made into a series by Channel 4. He has since published the novels truecrime, Johnny Come Home, The Devil's Paintbrush, The House of Rumour and, most recently, The Fatal Tree.Unanimous acclaim for Jake's most ambitious novel to date - 'A virtuoso blurring of fact and fantasy . . . highly entertaining and perhaps even mind-expanding' (Sunday Times). 'The ideal holiday read for those who like to take their brains with them on vacation' (Guardian).Reissued with a sleek, stylish new cover, alongside Jake's five other previous novels, to coincide with THE FATAL TREE's pb publication.For fans of Cloud Atlas, Gravity's Rainbow and The End of Mr Y. The kind of kaleidoscopic, ambitious, entertaining novel that is currently popular.

From the author of the cult hit The Long Firm, a mind-bending, thrilling journey into 20th-century history and outer space.

Larry Zagorski spins wild tales of fantasy worlds for pulp magazines. But as the Second World War hangs in the balance, the lines between imagination and reality are starting to blur.

In London, spymasters enlist occultists in the war of propaganda. In Southern California, a charismatic rocket scientist summons dark forces and an SF writer founds a new religion. In Munich, Nazis consult astrologists as they plot peace with the West and dominion over the East. And a conspiracy is born that will ripple through the decades to come.

The truth, it seems, is stranger than anything Larry could invent. But when he looks back on the 20th century, the past is as uncertain as the future. Just where does truth end and illusion begin?

THE HOUSE OF RUMOUR is a novel of soaring ambition, a mind-expanding journey through the ideas that have put man on the moon yet brought us to the brink of self-destruction.

What will you believe?

Jake Arnott was born in 1961, and lives in London. His debut novel, THE LONG FIRM, was published by Sceptre in 1999 to huge public and critical acclaim. HE KILLS COPPERS, TRUECRIME, JOHNNY COME HOME and THE DEVIL`S PAINTBRUSH have followed to equal acclaim. Both THE LONG FIRM and HE KILLS COPPERS have been made into widely praised TV dramas.

The debut novel by Kevin Powers

Reviews for THE YELLOW BIRDS

Read a selection of reviews for the stunning debut novel by Kevin Powers.
Sceptre

The Art of Thinking Clearly: Better Thinking, Better Decisions

By Rolf Dobelli

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER
THE TIMES BESTSELLER
MAIL ON SUNDAY BESTSELLER
GUARDIAN BESTSELLER
AMAZON TOP TEN BESTSELLER
LIVE MAGAZINE BESTSELLER
IRISH TIMES NUMBER 1 BESTSELLER

THE SECRETS OF PERFECT DECISION-MAKING

Have you ever...
Invested time in something that, with hindsight, just wasn't worth it?
Overpaid in an Ebay auction?
Continued doing something you knew was bad for you?
Sold stocks too late, or too early?
Taken credit for success, but blamed failure on external circumstances?
Backed the wrong horse?

These are examples of cognitive biases, simple errors we all make in our day-to-day thinking. But by knowing what they are and how to spot them, we can avoid them and make better choices - whether dealing with a personal problem or a business negotiation; trying to save money or make money; working out what we do or don't want in life, and how best to get it.

Already an international bestseller, THE ART OF THINKING CLEARLY is essential reading for anyone with important decisions to make. It reveals, in 100 short chapters, the most common errors of judgement, and how to avoid them. Simple, clear and always surprising, this indispensable book will change the way you think and transform your decision-making - at work, at home, every day.

This little gem . . . has already been a sell-out success in Europe and it's likely to be the same here.It's one of the most readable, entertaining volumes on systematic cognitive errors you are ever likely to need. You don't know what a systematic cognitive error is? You should read this book.A Swiss novelist and successful entrepreneur reveals the secrets of perfect decision making.No wonder this book has been a sensation in Europe. Dobelli examines our most common decision-making failings with engaging eloquence and describes how to counter them with instructive good sense.This book will change the way you thinkThis book provides a truly fresh perspective. It is intelligent, informative and witty. Rolf Dobelli's clear prose illuminates how we think.A treat - highly relevant, scientifically grounded and beautifully written.A fireworks show of insights into how our minds work.Already a huge bestseller in Europe, this is essential reading for anyone with important decisions to make, in the vein of THINKING, FAST AND SLOW and THE DECISION BOOK.

Rolf Dobelli, born 1966, is a Swiss writer, novelist and entrepreneur. He has an MBA and a PhD in economic philosophy from the University of St. Gallen, Switzerland. Dobelli is co-founder of getAbstract, the world's leading provider of book summaries. Dobelli has written six works of fiction. Most famously, he is author of THE ART OF THINKING CLEARLY, which became an instant success and landed on the number 1 spot on Germany's official Bestseller list and has been translated in many languages. Dobelli is also founder and curator of ZURICH.MINDS, an invitation-only community of the most distinguished thinkers, scientists and artists.
www.rolfdobelli.com
www.facebook.com/dobelli

NUMBER 1 INTERNATIONAL BESTSELLER - 250,000 copies sold in Germany, where the book has been number 1 for months.Follows format & style of Profile business bestseller The Decision Book (45k 9.99 hbs). Also similar to Daniel Kahneman's no. 1 non-fiction bestseller Thinking, Fast & Slow (24k+hbs, 35k pbs)'Rolf Dobelli is endowed with both imagination and realism, a combination hard to find since the 16th-century Renaissance'. Nicholas Nassim Taleb, author of BLACK SWANRights sold in over a dozen territories across Europe and AsiaHighly promotable Swiss author - entrepreneur, business guru, journalist novelist, sailor, pilot...
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