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By Jacques Peretti
Authors:
Jacques Peretti
'The book to read' GQ'A revelatory book' John Lewis-StempelPraise for The Billion Dollar Deals and How They're Changing Our World, the TV documentary which accompanies the book:'So brilliant, you want to take notes... It's a brilliant concept brilliantly executed.' Lucy Mangan, Guardian What if the way we understand our world is wrong? What if it isn't politicians and events that shape our lives, but secret deals made by people you've never heard of?This book tells the story of the secret deals that are changing the world, and revolutionizing everything we do, including money, the food we eat, what we buy, and the drugs we take to stay well. These deals never make the news: they are made high up in boardrooms, on golf courses, and in luxury cars: each sealed by world-changing handshakes. This is the story of those handshakes.
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Deep Thinking

By Garry Kasparov
Authors:
Garry Kasparov
In May 1997, the world watched as Garry Kasparov, the greatest chess player in the world, was defeated for the first time by the IBM supercomputer Deep Blue. It was a watershed moment in the history of technology: machine intelligence had arrived at the point where it could best human intellect.It wasn't a coincidence that Kasparov became the symbol of man's fight against the machines. Chess has long been the fulcrum in development of machine intelligence; the hoax automaton 'The Turk' in the 18th century and Alan Turing's first chess program in 1952 were two early examples of the quest for machines to think like humans -- a talent we measured by their ability to beat their creators at chess. As the pre-eminent chessmaster of the 80s and 90s, it was Kasparov's blessing and his curse to play against each generation's strongest computer champions, contributing to their development and advancing the field. Like all passionate competitors, Kasparov has taken his defeat and learned from it. He has devoted much energy to devising ways in which humans can partner with machines in order to produce results better than either can achieve alone. During the twenty years since playing Deep Blue, he's played both with and against machines, learning a great deal about our vital relationship with our most remarkable creations. Ultimately, he's become convinced that by embracing the competition between human and machine intelligence, we can spend less time worrying about being replaced and more thinking of new challenges to conquer.In this breakthrough book, Kasparov tells his side of the story of Deep Blue for the first time -- what it was like to strategize against an implacable, untiring opponent -- the mistakes he made and the reasons the odds were against him. But more than that, he tells his story of AI more generally, and how he's evolved to embrace it, taking part in an urgent debate with philosophers worried about human values, programmers creating self-learning neural networks, and engineers of cutting edge robotics.
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Dealing With Difficult People In A Week

By Naomi Langford-Wood, Brian Salter
Authors:
Naomi Langford-Wood, Brian Salter
The ability to deal with difficult people is crucial to anyone who wants to advance their career. Written by Brian Salter and Naomi Langford-Wood, leading experts on dealing with difficult people as both coaches and practitioners, this book quickly teaches you the insider secrets you need to know to in order to overcome the barriers presented by difficult colleagues or customers.The highly motivational 'in a week' structure of the book provides seven straightforward chapters explaining the key points, and at the end there are optional questions to ensure you have taken it all in. There are also cartoons and diagrams throughout, to help make this book a more enjoyable and effective learning experience.So what are you waiting for? Let this book put you on the fast track to success!
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Do Polar Bears Get Lonely?

Do Polar Bears Get Lonely? is the third compilation of readers' answers to the questions in the 'Last Word' column of New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly. Following the phenomenal success of Does Anything Eat Wasps? (2005) and the even more spectacularly successful Why Don't Penguins' Feet Freeze? (2006), this latest collection includes a bumper crop of wise and wonderful answers never before seen in book form.As usual, the simplest questions often have the most complex answers - while some that seem the knottiest have very simple explanations. New Scientist's 'Last Word' is regularly voted the magazine's most popular section as it celebrates all questions - the trivial, idiosyncratic, baffling and strange. This all-new and eagerly awaited selection of the best again presents popular science at its most entertaining and enlightening.
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Does Anything Eat Wasps

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Difficult Conversations In A Week

By Martin Manser
Authors:
Martin Manser
Difficult conversations just got easierHow do you deal professionally with a colleague whose work is seriously below standard? A supplier who is always late? Saying 'no' graciously? Giving someone bad news? Many of us have been on the receiving end of business conversations that have been badly handled, poorly timed or scarcely prepared for by the person we're talking to. This practical book offers help to new and aspiring managers in a variety of business situations, such as delivering bad news in an appraisal, and how to work with a range of colleagues who may be lazy, negative orincompetent.Whether you choose to read it in a week or in a single sitting, Difficult Conversations In A Week is your fastest route to success:- Sunday: Why are some conversations difficult? We may tend to avoid difficult conversations: how else can you deal with them? - Monday: Manage your emotions Distinguish the facts of an incident and how colleagues feel about it and their sense of identity.- Tuesday: Prepare well The venue, atmosphere and timing of a difficult conversation are all important. It is essential that you prepare well, especially your opening words and the direction that you want the conversation to go in, including alternative ways to resolve the issue.- Wednesday: Listen carefully As you listen, you discover more about your colleague's background and motivation. You also need to learn how to ask incisive questions that get to the root of an issue.- Thursday: Treat colleagues with respect In a difficult conversation, you need to affirm your colleague and continue to listen until they feel heard. You will explain your point of view politely, yet firmly, being neither passive nor aggressive in tone.- Friday: Seek change Involve colleagues in a conversation; learn how to deal with certain kinds of colleagues, for example, those who are lazy, aggressive or shy.- Saturday: Build trusting relationships Work hard to develop strong working relationships, so that when you have to have a difficult conversation, you will be better placed to do sobecause you will know the person better.
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Direct Marketing In A Week

By Patrick Forsyth
Authors:
Patrick Forsyth
Direct marketing just got easierPicking the right promotional mix is not easy. Whatever is done it must be effective, and also cost-effective, and both budgets and time are no doubt limited. Business does not arrive unbidden (or very little of it does), nor does it magically arrive just by crossing your fingers and shouting 'Promotion!'; so something must be done and time and effort must be expended to make sure it works.Even in this electronic age, direct mail remains a popular form of promotion. It can certainly find and hold customers and do so cost-effectively too. But, you may have noticed, it does not have the best image - the words 'junk mail' are frequently used in relation to direct mail offerings! However, used carefully, it can work for seller and buyer alike. This book sets out how to utilize direct marketing formaximum benefit for both.If you position the use of direct mail effectively within the totality of your promotional mix, and make it work well - and that means systematically making sure that every element of it works well, from a letter and brochure to an envelope and much more - it can be an important part of your business generating process. In this book, in seven succinct chapters,we review how to make that so.Each of the seven chapters in Direct Marketing In A Week covers a different aspect:- Sunday: The recipients: database considerations- Monday: The core elements of direct mail- Tuesday: The component mix- Wednesday: Creatively enhancing persuasiveness- Thursday: Follow-up activity- Friday: Email approaches: as easy as 'click'- Saturday: Future campaigns
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Deliver Great Training Courses In A Week

By Martin Manser
Authors:
Martin Manser
Training just got easierYou have probably been on both good and bad training courses. Unfortunately, it may be the bad ones that you remember - perhaps the content was badly ordered, the arrangements were poor, the speaker was boring. How can you prepare for and lead an outstanding training course? In this book we will show you how.Sunday: What is training? What are you aiming to achieve? What are the basic different styles in which colleagues learn - and in which trainers train? What overall points should you consider and what practical arrangements do you need to think about, for example on timing and venue?Monday: Identify the training needs clearly How to analyse participants' training needs, using various sources; use the needs to define clear learning outcomes that are both SMART and also relevant to participants' real work and jobs.Tuesday: Design the course carefully How to continue to prepare well: think about the points you want to communicate and order them clearly; find a fresh angle; be motivational, inspirational and practical; write a strong beginning and round off your training well at the end.Wednesday: Plan variety creatively Why the need to change the style of training regularly throughout the session is important to maintain participants' interest and involvement; plan variety; consider different ways to encourage group participation; use visual aids and PowerPoints effectively.Thursday: Implement your plan successfully Go for it! Put all your preparation into practice on the day itself. How will you make a good first impression and make the most of informal times? Body language is important; how will you overcome nerves? Learn how to deal with difficult people.Friday: Evaluate the training thoroughly Why identifying what went well and what didn't go so well is important; checking on 'learning' after the course is essential to determine changed attitudes, behaviour patterns, and so on. Review your training to see if it had its desired effects: if not, reassess and begin the process again.Saturday: Refine your skills constantly You have completed your training course and evaluated it; now learn how to cultivate the qualities of a professional trainer, for example by keeping up to date with your subject, learning from your mistakes and mentoring a colleague to lead training courses.
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Decision Making In A Week

By Martin Manser
Authors:
Martin Manser
Making decisions just got easierYou make decisions all the time in everyday life: what to eat, what clothes to wear, with whom you spend your leisure time and how you spend your money. In your business life you are also constantly making decisions: the different activities you - and your business colleagues - need to carry out in order to arrive at a sound decision. At work, you are deciding how to spend your time, which emails to answer, what subjects to raise at a meeting, when is the best time for your company to launch a new product, what companies you should invest in, what you are not willing to compromise on in negotiations, what policies to develop and how best to market your products and services. Some of these decisions may have already been made for you by other colleagues, usually those above you in your company or organization, and your task is merely to implement them. In other matters, however, you can exercise some control over the actual decision-making process.Each of the seven chapters in Decision Making In A Week covers a different aspect of the decision-making process:- Sunday: Know your aims clearly. What are you actually making a decision about?- Monday: Collect relevant information. Consider all the relevant factors as you gather the information you need.- Tuesday: Identify different options. Widen your thinking, challenge assumptions and consider creative solutions.- Wednesday: Work effectively as a team. Make decisions as a group so that colleagues will feel motivated to implement the decision.- Thursday: Evaluate different options. Set objective criteria against which you can examine the various options you have identified.- Friday: Make an informed decision and implement it, communicating it well to all the relevant parties.- Saturday: Review the decision carefully, evaluating the whole decision-making process, noting what went well and learning from mistakes.
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  • Darwin: All That Matters

    By Alison Pearn
    Authors:
    Alison Pearn
    Charles Darwin's name is among the most recognised in the world, and more than 100 years after his death his books are still best-sellers; there are more than ten modern editions of the most famous, On the Origin of Species, currently available. His theories of descent with modification and of sexual selection are among the most influential ever formulated, but those theories, which imply the interconnectedness not just of humans and animals but of every living thing, are often imperfectly understood, or even willfully misrepresented, and Darwin himself is reduced to a two-dimensional character, a cipher deployed in the guerilla warfare between fundamentalist religion and hard line atheism. How many people know that Darwin was famous among his family and friends for his sense of fun? Darwin: All That Matters puts his life, personality, and the full breadth and significance of his work in context, with greater emphasis on his post-Origin work. It is perfect for those who want to gain a sound grasp of the subject quickly, and those looking for a good entry-level book as a starting point for further study.
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    Decision Making In A Week

    By Martin Manser
    Authors:
    Martin Manser
    The ability to make the right decision is crucial to anyone who wants to advance their career.Written by Martin Manser, a leading expert on decision making in a business context, this book quickly teaches you the insider secrets you need to know to in order to choose the right path.The highly motivational 'in a week' structure of the book provides seven straightforward chapters explaining the key points, and at the end there are optional questions to ensure you have taken it all in. There are also cartoons and diagrams throughout, to help make this book a more enjoyable and effective learning experience.So what are you waiting for? Let this book put you on the fast track to success!
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    Darwin and Evolution: Bullet Guides

    By James Napier
    Authors:
    James Napier
    What's in this book?Open this book and you will...- Learn about Darwin's life- Understand evolution- Analyse the main arguments- Explore the theory's developmentsLearn about Evolution- Who was Charles Darwin?- Natural selection- Species and speciation- Darwin's gaps- Variation and natural selection- Evidence for evolution- The arguments against- The tree of life- Human evolution- Darwin's legacyWhat are Bullet Guides?The answers you need - now.Clear and concise guides in a portable format. Information is displayed in an easy-to-read layout with helpful images and tables. Bullet Guides include all you need to know about a subject in a nutshell. Get right to the point without wading through loads of unnecessary information.
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    Dealing with Difficult People Easily: Flash

    By Karen Mannering
    Authors:
    Karen Mannering
    The books in this bite-sized new series contain no complicated techniques or tricky materials, making them ideal for the busy, the time-pressured or the merely curious. In just 96 pages, Dealing with Difficult People Easliy shows you how to deal with an unpleasant but unavoidable aspect of working life that can have a major impact on your career and wellbeing, including knowing how to define and deal with a difficult person in any work relationship and how to understand yourself and deal with difficult aspects of your own personality.
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    Driving Down Cost

    By Andrew Wileman
    Authors:
    Andrew Wileman
    Drawing on over 25 years consultancy experience running over 50 big one-time, cost-reduction projects internationally, Wileman provides a Cost Management Toolkit of key ideas and cost management strategies for analysing cost-management including procurement and management accounts and looks at how the leadership team needs to take the lead and set the tone on cost. He lays out a set of ideas, approaches, tips and tricks that have worked for him and looks at the sneaky ways cost can be created and the even sneakier, smart ways they can be cut - like getting your customers to do your work for you, or turning cost into revenue. Packed with real-life, international case studies and practical techniques for implementing cost reduction programmes in a period of chaos in the markets and worldwide recession, this new edition could not be more timely.
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    A DIAMOND IN THE DESERT: Behind the Scenes in the World's Richest City

    By Jo Tatchell
    Authors:
    Jo Tatchell
    Barely forty years ago, Abu Dhabi was a fishing village on the Arabian Gulf. Now the capital of the United Arab Emirates, its citizens are each worth $17 million, it holds major stakes in Western economies, and has money to burn.In this timely, revealing and evocative portrait of a global player, Jo Tatchell traces the emirate's dramatic development and the sometimes ruinous effect of extreme wealth on its people and their desert culture. And as its rulers fund another giant leap forward, she probes behind the official facade to examine whether this secretive and controlled society can realise its breathtaking plans to transform relations between East and West.
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    Digital Photography For The Over 50s: Teach Yourself

    By Peter Cope
    Authors:
    Peter Cope
    Do you want to get to grips with your camera? Do you want to take some great photos and make them even better using your computer?Do you want to learn how to create great photo albums, share photos on the internet, even create slideshows to share with family and friends?Teach Yourself Photography for the Over 50s shows you how to choose a digital camera, become familiar with its functions and use it to produce some memorable photos. The book uses clear instructions, useful hints and tips and illustrations to show you all the essential techniques. Avoiding jargon and computerspeak, it also shows you how to use your computer with your camera and explores opportunities for producing great photos without a computer.NOT GOT MUCH TIME?One, five and ten-minute introductions to key principles to get you started.AUTHOR INSIGHTSLots of instant help with common problems and quick tips for success, based on the author's many years of experience.TEST YOURSELFTests in the book and online to keep track of your progress.EXTEND YOUR KNOWLEDGEExtra online articles at www.teachyourself.com to give you a richer understanding of digital photography.FIVE THINGS TO REMEMBERQuick refreshers to help you remember the key facts.TRY THISInnovative exercises illustrate what you've learnt and how to use it.
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    Developing Exemplary Performance One Person at a Time

    By Michael Sabbag
    Authors:
    Michael Sabbag
    Why is it that some employees, regardless of their strong skills and knowledge base, still underperform? The answer may lie in other root causes in the workplace: the environment or culture, the available tools and resources or a lack of systems or processes. Isolating a root cause-and its corresponding performance opportunity- is the first step in helping an employee develop and grow. Only then can a targeted solution, whether a job redesign or one-on-one coaching or training, be identified and applied so that individuals can achieve peak performance. Developing Exemplary Performance One Person at a Time lays out a simple process to identify the "right" performance focus-one exemplary strength that can be leveraged and one "expandable" strength with development potential-and turn it into results that support an organization's overall strategy and success.
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    Deciding Who Leads

    By Joseph Daniel McCool
    Authors:
    Joseph Daniel McCool
    Enter the secret world of executive search consulting . . . . . .and discover how this influential-but largely invisible-profession is charting the course of global business. Executive search expert Joseph Daniel McCool delivers a rich exposé of the elite world of search consulting-the single most influential form of management consulting engaged by organizations-and its powerful impact on the future of organizational performance, culture, and profits. Deciding Who Leads offers a front-row seat from which to witness the high-stakes drama, victories, and missteps that characterize the executive search process amid what has become an intense, truly global competition for leadership talent.
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    Don't Tell Mum I Work on the Rigs

    By Paul Carter
    Authors:
    Paul Carter
    A take-no-prisoners approach to life has seen Paul Carter heading to some of the world's most remote, wild and dangerous places as a contractor in the oil business. Amazingly, he's survived (so far) to tell these stories from the edge of civilization. He has been shot at, hijacked and held hostage; almost died of dysentery in Asia and toothache in Russia; watched a Texan lose his mind in the jungles of Asia; lost a lot of money backing a scorpion against a mouse in a fight to the death, and been served cocktails by an orangutan on an ocean freighter. And that's just his day job. Taking postings in some of the world's wildest and most remote regions, not to mention some of the roughest rigs on the planet, Paul has worked, got into trouble, and been given serious talkings to, in locations as far-flung as the North Sea, Middle East, Borneo and Tunisia, as exotic as Sumatra, Vietnam and Thailand, and as flat-out dangerous as Columbia, Nigeria and Russia, with some of the maddest, baddest and strangest people you could ever hope not to meet.
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    Does Anything Eat Wasps?

    How long can I live on beer alone? Why do people have eyebrows? Has nature invented any wheels? Plus other questions are answered in this audiobook. Every year, readers send in thousands of questions to New Scientist, the world's best-selling science weekly, in the hope that the answers to them will be given in the 'Last Word' column - regularly voted the most popular section of the magazine. DOES ANYTHING EAT WASPS?is a collection of the best that have appeared, including: why can't we eat green potatoes? Why do airliners suddenly plummet? Does a compass work in space? Why do all the local dogs howl at emergency sirens? How can a tree grow out of a chimney stack? Why do bruises go through a range of colours? And why is the sea blue inside caves? Many seemingly simple questions are actually very complex to answer. And some that seem difficult have a very simple explanation. New Scientist's 'Last Word' celebrates all questions - the trivial, the idiosyncratic, the baffling and the strange. This selection of the best is popular science at its most entertaining and enlightening.
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