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Kill Bad Meetings

By Kevan Hall, Alan Hall
Authors:
Kevan Hall, Alan Hall
CUT 50% OF YOUR MEETINGS AND IMPROVE THE ONES THAT REMAINMeetings are essential to collaboration and decision making, but they are often irrelevant, time consuming and badly run. People spend an average of 2 days per week in meetings and 50% of it is wasted. This book will help you win back that wasted day a week by cutting out the half of face to face and virtual meetings that do not need to happen and radically improving the ones that remain.The two authors, one an experienced CEO and consultant to major multinationals, the other a millennial line manager working within one of the world's largest companies, find common ground, and occasional disagreements on creating new ways of meeting both face to face and through technology that are far more engaging and effective for everyone.The book focuses on three main areas:· Dealing with the business and corporate cultural challenges in changing the way we meet· Cutting out the unnecessary topics and participants that make up 50% of todays meetings· Designing and running faster and more focused face to face and online meetings with more relevant content; clearer decisions and actions, and much higher levels of participationFull of examples and practical tools that will improve everything from your regular team meetings to management meetings, online conferences, global meetings and big events. This book will lead you through practical actions and targets to kill the meetings that do not need to happen and radically improve the ones that remain.
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Katherine Howard

By Josephine Wilkinson
Authors:
Josephine Wilkinson
'An impressive revisionist biography' The TimesLooming out of the encroaching darkness of the February evening was London Bridge, still ornamented with the severed heads of Thomas Culpeper and Francis Dereham; the terrible price they had paid for suspected intimacy with the queen.Katherine now reached the Tower of London, her final destination. Katherine Howard was the fifth wife of Henry VIII and cousin to the executed Anne Boleyn. She first came to court as a young girl of fourteen, but even prior to that her fate had been sealed and she was doomed to die. She was beheaded in 1542 for crimes of adultery and treason, in one of the most sensational scandals of the Tudor age.The traditional story of Henry VIII's fifth queen dwells on her sexual exploits before she married the king, and her execution is seen as her just dessert for having led an abominable life. However, the true story of Katherine Howard could not be more different. Far from being a dark tale of court factionalism and conspiracy, Katherine's story is one of child abuse, family ambition, religious conflict and political and sexual intrigue. It is also a tragic love story. A bright, kind and intelligent young woman, Katherine was fond of clothes and dancing, yet she also had a strong sense of duty and tried to be a good wife to Henry. She handled herself with grace and queenly dignity to the end, even as the barge carrying her on her final journey drew up at the Tower of London, where she was to be executed for high treason.Little more than a child in a man's world, she was the tragic victim of those who held positions of authority over her, and from whose influence she was never able to escape.
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King, Kaiser, Tsar

By Catrine Clay
Authors:
Catrine Clay
During the last days of July 1914 telegrams flew between the King, the Kaiser and the Tsar. George V, Wilhelm II and Nicholas II, known in the family as Georgie, Willy and Nicky, were cousins. Between them they ruled over half the world. They had been friends since childhood. But by July 1914 the Trade Union of Kings was falling apart. Each was blaming the other for the impending disaster of the First World War. 'Have I gone mad ' Nicky asked his wife Alix in St Petersburg, showing her another telegram from Willy. 'What on earth does William mean pretending that it still depends on me whether war is averted or not!' Behind the friendliness of family gatherings lurked family quarrels, which were often played out in public. Drawing widely on previously unpublished documents, this is the extraordinary story of their overlapping lives, conducted in palaces of unimaginable opulence, surrounded by flattery and political intrigue. And through it runs the question: to what extent were the King, the Kaiser and the Tsar responsible for the outbreak of the war, and, as it turned out, for the end of autocratic monarchy
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The King's Grave

By Philippa Langley, Michael Jones
Authors:
Philippa Langley, Michael Jones
Now with a new chapter.The official inside story of the life, death and remarkable discovery of history's most controversial monarch.On 22 August 1485 Richard III was killed at Bosworth Field, the last king of England to die in battle. His victorious opponent, Henry Tudor (the future Henry VII), went on to found one of our most famous ruling dynasties. Richard's body was displayed in undignified fashion for two days in nearby Leicester and then hurriedly buried in the church of the Greyfriars. Fifty years later, at the time of the dissolution of the monasteries, the king's grave was lost - its contents believed to be emptied into the river Soar and Richard III's reputation buried under a mound of Tudor propaganda. Its culmination was Shakespeare's compelling portrayal of a deformed and murderous villain, written over a hundred years after Richard's death. Now - in an incredible find - Richard III's remains have been uncovered beneath a car park in Leicester. The King's Grave traces this remarkable journey. In alternate chapters, Philippa Langley, whose years of research and belief that she would find Richard in this exact spot inspired the project, reveals the inside story of the search for the king's grave, and historian Michael Jones tells of Richard's fifteenth-century life and death. The result is a compelling portrayal of one of our greatest archaeological discoveries, allowing a complete re-evaluation of our most controversial monarch - one that discards the distortions of later Tudor histories and puts the man firmly back into the context of his times.
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Kiss Me, Chudleigh

By William Cook
Authors:
William Cook
Auberon Waugh was a philosopher - savage, eccentric, but a philosopher nonetheless. More than any writer of his era, Auberon Waugh had a genius for dividing his readers, into the delighted and the infuriated, and he retains the ability to start a squabble, even from beyond the grave. Kiss Me, Chudleigh is a collection of Waugh's best writing. It is also a compact biography. It consists of excerpts from the things he wrote, drawn from every stage of his career, from his salad days on the Catholic Herald to his swansong on the Literary Review. Probably the most prolific journalist of his generation (and surely the wittiest) he wrote copiously for publications as diverse as the New Statesman and The Daily Telegraph. He wrote a political column for The Spectator and a country column in the Evening Standard, a wine column, a medical column and heaps of entertaining travel pieces. Arranged both chronologically and thematically, marrying his main preoccupations with the main phases of his life: school (where he received a record number of beatings); university (he came down from Oxford after one year, without a degree); Fleet Street (where he cut his teeth writing captions for the Sunday Mirror's bathing beauties); France (where he lived while writing his second novel, and returned regularly throughout his life); the House of Commons (where he won his spurs as a political correspondent); Grub Street (where he found his comic voice, writing for Private Eye); Somerset (where he made his home) and Abroad (from war reporting in Biafra to travel writing in Bangkok).
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The King Maker eBook

By Geordie Greig
Authors:
Geordie Greig
Louis Greig, a war hero and rugby international, entered the privileged world of the British royal family as mentor, physician and friend to a young and hesitant Prince Albert, the man who became King George VI and whose challenges were so vividly brought to life in the award winning film, The King's Speech. Greig's influence helped to guide the prince from a stammering, shy schoolboy to become one of the most respected constitutional monarchs, seeing the nation through the Second World War and bringing the monarchy closer to the people. Geordie Greig, grandson of Louis Greig, has drawn on private family papers and public archives to reveal an intimate friendship which lasted almost half a century. Previously published as Louis and the Prince by Hodder and Stoughton.
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The King Maker

By Geordie Greig
Authors:
Geordie Greig
Louis Greig, a war hero and rugby international, entered the privileged world of the British royal family as mentor, physician and friend to a young and hesitant Prince Albert, the man who became King George VI and whose challenges were so vividly brought to life in the award winning film, The King's Speech. Greig's influence helped to guide the prince from a stammering, shy schoolboy to become one of the most respected constitutional monarchs, seeing the nation through the Second World War and bringing the monarchy closer to the people. Geordie Greig, grandson of Louis Greig, has drawn on private family papers and public archives to reveal an intimate friendship which lasted almost half a century. Previously published as Louis and the Prince by Hodder and Stoughton.
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Kenneth Williams: Born Brilliant

By Christopher Stevens
Authors:
Christopher Stevens
Kenneth Williams was the stand-out comic actor of his generation. Beloved as the manic star of Carry On films and as a peerless raconteur on TV chat shows, he was also acclaimed for serious stage roles. Born Brilliant will include much previously unseen material from Williams's candid daily journal and also draw on rare in-depth interviews with friends and colleagues. Since the publication of edited extracts from his diaries, much controversy has surrounded Williams's personal and professional lives. This biography traces the complex contradictions that characterised an extraordinary life and presents the first full portrait of a star who was born brilliant.
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Knave of Spades

By Alan Titchmarsh
Authors:
Alan Titchmarsh
From gardener's apprentice to favourite TV presenter - how did it all begin?When Alan left school at fifteen little was expected of him. But in the ancient greenhouses of the local nursery Mrs T's little lad found his spiritual home, learning his trade and the strange ways of human nature.But the comfort and familiarity of his home in the Yorkshire Dales would soon be left behind as he journeyed south to college and then to Kew Gardens. Spells as a teacher and editor followed, until fate took a hand when he landed a job on BBC's Nationwide as their gardening presenter. His childhood dream of inheriting the mantle of gardening god Percy Thrower was beginning to come true...In KNAVE OF SPADES Alan Titchmarsh shows us just why he has become not only our favourite gardener, but a popular writer and broadcaster too.
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