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Jo Cox

By Brendan Cox
Authors:
Brendan Cox
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Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories

By Thomas Grant
Authors:
Thomas Grant
THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLERSHORTLISTED FOR THE CWA NON-FICTION DAGGER'Thomas Grant has brought together Hutchinson's greatest legal hits, producing a fascinating episodic cultural history of post-war Britain that chronicles the end of deference and secrecy, and the advent of a more permissive society . . . Grant brings out the essence of each case, and Hutchinson's role, with clarity and wit' Ben Macintyre, The Times'An excellent book . . . Grant recounts these trials in limpid prose which clarifies obscurities. A delicious flavouring of cool irony, which is so much more effective than hot indignation, covers his treatment of the small mindedness and cheapness behind some prosecutions' Richard Davenport-Hines, GuardianBorn in 1915 into the fringes of the Bloomsbury Group, Jeremy Hutchinson went on to become the greatest criminal barrister of the 1960s, '70s and '80s. The cases of that period changed society for ever and Hutchinson's role in them was second to none. In Case Histories, Jeremy Hutchinson's most remarkable trials are examined, each one providing a fascinating look into Britain's post-war social, political and cultural history.Accessibly and entertainingly written, Case Histories provides a definitive account of Jeremy Hutchinson's life and work. From the sex and spying scandals which contributed to Harold Macmillan's resignation in 1963 and the subsequent fall of the Conservative government, to the fight against literary censorship through his defence of Lady Chatterley's Lover and Fanny Hill, Hutchinson was involved in many of the great trials of the period. He defended George Blake, Christine Keeler, Great Train robber Charlie Wilson, Kempton Bunton (the only man successfully to 'steal' a picture from the National Gallery), art 'faker' Tom Keating, and Howard Marks who, in a sensational defence, was acquitted of charges relating to the largest importation of cannabis in British history. He also prevented the suppression of Bernardo Bertolucci's notorious film Last Tango in Paris and did battle with Mary Whitehouse when she prosecuted the director of the play Romans in Britain.Above all else, Jeremy Hutchinson's career, both at the bar and later as a member of the House of Lords, has been one devoted to the preservation of individual liberty and to resisting the incursions of an overbearing state. Case Histories provides entertaining, vivid and revealing insights into what was really going on in those celebrated courtroom dramas that defined an age, as well as painting a picture of a remarkable life.To listen to Jeremy Hutchinson being interviewed by Helena Kennedy on BBC Radio 4's A Law Unto Themselves, please follow the link: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b04d4cpvYou can also listen to him on BBC Radio 4's Desert Island Discs with Kirsty Young: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b03ddz8m
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Jessica Ennis: Unbelievable - From My Childhood Dreams To Winning Olympic Gold

By Jessica Ennis
Authors:
Jessica Ennis
On 4 August 2012 Jessica Ennis kicked off what some described as the greatest night in British sporting history. For her it was the end of a long, winding, and sometimes harrowing road.Hers is an inspiring tale of following your dreams no matter what life throws at you.Unbelievable is a refreshingly candid account of her rise to fame in a highly charged world in which body image issues and drug abuses lurk. From the unique pressures facing her, to behind-the-scenes glimpses into the greatest show on earth, and a revealing account of her love-hate relationship with her long-term coach, Jessica reveals the truth behind the smiles for the first time. Unbelievable includes exclusive behind-the-scenes photos. This is the story of how the girl next door became London's poster girl, and how an ordinary woman used an extraordinary talent to claim the title of the world's greatest all-round female sports star.
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The Jasvinder Sanghera Ebook Collection: Shame, Daughters of Shame & Shame Travels

By Jasvinder Sanghera
Authors:
Jasvinder Sanghera
Jasvinder Sanghera's Top 10 bestseller SHAME ('A success story to inspire anyone' Time Magazine) brought the issue of forced marriage into the public eye; DAUGHTERS OF SHAME is the gripping account of her on-going campaign against domestic violence and honour-based crime told through the voices of some of the victims; and SHAME TRAVELS the moving tale of Jasvinder's journey to India in search of her half-sister.
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Just the Job, Lad

By Mike Pannett
Authors:
Mike Pannett
After ten years with the Metropolitan Police, Mike has returned to his North Yorkshire roots. Working a rural beat in God's Own Country he finds that life and crime in the countryside continue to throw up fresh challenges.When a drug dealer targets the towns and villages of Ryedale, Mike launches an investigation that will uncover nationwide connections. News of a proposed ban on hunting with dogs raises hackles amongst his friends and contacts, threatening to put him in the firing line. And, as he starts working towards his sergeant's exams, there's trouble on the home front. The roof at Keeper's Cottage springs a leak during a thunderstorm - and they have to share their love-nest with the builder.But none of this matches the drama of the anti-hunt demo which threatens to stop a train bringing a local MP to town. With horseman racing alongside the steam engine, and a protester lying on the tracks, Mike has to call on all his resources to handle an inflammatory situation with the media looking on.
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John Giles: A Football Man - My Autobiography

By John Giles, John Giles
Authors:
John Giles, John Giles
'The dream was football . . .'John Giles had a gift. At the age of three, he could kick a ball the way it was supposed to be kicked. And he knew that every hour that passed without kicking a ball was an hour wasted.'It was the same dream that most of the kids had at that time . . .'In A Football Man, Giles tells the story of a dream pursued and realised beyond his wildest imaginings, from his humble beginnings in Ormond Square in 1940s' Dublin,counting down the minutes to his next game of football, to that unforgettable moment when the original football man - his dad, 'Dickie' - announced that his young son, at just fourteen, was on his way to Manchester United.'What I didn't realise was that my dream would come true.'Full of anecdote, insight and wry humour, Giles recounts his rise through the ranks at Manchester United, before and after the Munich Disaster; the great players he knew, the good and the bad times under Matt Busby; his sensational debut for Ireland which he served as player and manager; his starring role in the brilliant, controversial Leeds United of the '60s and '70s; and his challenge to the portrayal of himself and Brian Clough in The Damned United. He also describes his enduring friendship with the 'kid from across Dublin's Tolka Park', Eamon Dunphy, and his career on RTÉ2's football panel, where Giles' intelligent and insightful analysis have made him an even more well-loved and respected national figure.
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James Lees-Milne

By Michael Bloch
Authors:
Michael Bloch
James Lees-Milne (1908-97) - known to friends as Jim - is remembered for his work for the National Trust, rescuing some of England's greatest architectural treasures, and for the vivid and entertaining diaries which have earned him a reputation as 'the twentieth-century Pepys'. In this long-awaited biography, Michael Bloch portrays a life rich in contradictions, in which an unassuming youth overtook more dazzling contemporaries to emerge as a leading figure in the fields of conservation and letters. It describes Jim's bisexual love life, his tempestuous marriage to the exotic Alvilde, and his friendship with other fascinating literary figures including John Betjeman, Robert Byron, Rosamond Lehmann, and the Mitford sisters (whose brother Tom had been Jim's great love at Eton). It depicts a man who was romantically attached to the England of his childhood and felt out of tune with his own times, but who left an enduring legacy through the preservation of country houses and his eloquent chronicling of a dying world.
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Jennie Churchill

By Anne Sebba, Anne Sebba
Authors:
Anne Sebba, Anne Sebba
After a three-day romance Brooklyn-born Jennie Jerome married into the British aristocracy, becoming Lady Randolph Churchill. At a time when women were afforded few freedoms, she was a behind-the-scenes political dynamo. However it was Jennies love life that marked her out, earning her the epithet more panther than woman. In other ways, Jennie was deeply loyal to her husband. When he was dying of syphilis she took him on a round-the-world trip to conceal his violence and mania. Her great project became her son, Winston, with whom she was entwined in an intense mutual dependency. Jennie died suddenly in 1921 and although Winston was not to become the nation's leader for another two decades, he had acquired from his mother an unshakeable faith in his destiny. With unprecedented access to private family correspondence, newly discovered archival material and interviews with Jennie's two surviving granddaughters, Anne Sebba draws a vivid and frank portrait of her subject. She repositions Jennie as a woman who refused to be cowed by her eras customary repression of women. Jennie Churchill was creative and passionate, determined to live life to the full.
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JPR: Given the Breaks - My Life in Rugby

By Jpr Williams
Authors:
Jpr Williams
JPR Williams won his first cap for Wales in 1969, and until his retirement in 1981 was the mainstay of Welsh teams that won six Triple Crowns, three Grand Slams and six Five Nations Championships. Renowned for his power and bravery on the pitch, JPR is a hero to the Welsh and a respected icon of the rugby world. In his autobiography, JPR recalls his childhood in Bridgend and the early signs that he was destined for sporting greatness. He showed initial promise as a tennis player, beating David Lloyd at the age of seventeen to win Junior Wimbledon, but in 1968 decided to abandon any plan of becoming a professional tennis player in order to combine his medical career with amateur rugby. That year he was selected for the Welsh tour of Argentina, and this marked the beginning of his rugby adventure. He relives his early rugby career and remembers the most exciting matches of his playing days, both for Wales and for the British and Irish Lions, including the 1971 win against the All Blacks - the only time the Lions have ever beaten New Zealand in a series - a team in which he was an integral player. His love of rugby was so strong that he was unable to tear himself away from the game, and played amateur rugby well into his fifties with Tondu, the Welsh junior side.
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John Betjeman: The Biography

By Bevis Hillier
Authors:
Bevis Hillier
This biography takes the reader from Betjeman's troubled childhood in north London, through his blossoming at Oxford; a gay fling with W. H. Auden; a clandestine marriage to a field marshal's daughter; pranks as a film critic; wartime service and probable espionage in Ireland, to the glory days of his later years when his Collected Poems became a runaway bestseller. This book is a distillation of Bevis Hillier's three-volume biography, authorized by Betjeman himself.
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John

By Cynthia Lennon
Authors:
Cynthia Lennon
Cynthia and John Lennon's relationship spanned ten crucial years of the Beatles phenomenon. But as well as new insight into the Beatles years, Cynthia has a compelling personal story of marriage, motherhood and the man who was to become the most idolised and admired of all the Beatles.Cynthia is candid about the cruel and the loving sides of John. She tells of the end of their marriage and the beginning of his relationship with Yoko Ono in more detail than ever before, and reveals the many difficulties estrangement from John - and then his death - brought for herself and Julian. Cynthia is a remarkable survivor and this is her extraordinary story and unique insight into a man loved and idolised all over the world.
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Johnners - The Life Of Brian

By Barry Johnston
Authors:
Barry Johnston
Born in 1912, Brian spent a luxurious childhood in a Queen Anne house in Hertfordshire. When he was just ten years old the family suffered the tragic death of his father and were forced to sell the family home. A few years later Brian was sent to Eton, which he always said were the happiest days of his life - and where he demonstrated an early flair for cricket. After leaving school he longed to join the theatre, but instead travelled to Hamburg and then Brazil to learn the family trade - the coffee business. His travels were cut short after eighteen months when he became gravely ill and he returned home.War broke out and Brian joined the 2nd Battallion Grenadier Guards serving in Normandy after D-Day, where he earned the Military Cross for 'untiring determination and cheerfulness under fire'. Six weeks after being demobbed he joined the BBC. He only planned to work there a few months; he ended up staying for 48 years, where his career ranged from performing in music halls, presenting children's television shows and, of course, presenting and commentating on television and radio, which quickly made him a household name. Told with candour and affection, THE LIFE OF BRIAN reveals the private side of a man who became a public institution.
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