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Civilisation

By Kenneth Clark
Authors:
Kenneth Clark
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Crete

By Antony Beevor
Authors:
Antony Beevor
Acclaimed historian and best-selling author Antony Beevor vividly brings to life the epic struggles that took place in Second World War Crete - reissued with a new introduction.'The best book we have got on Crete' ObserverThe Germans expected their airborne attack on Crete in 1941 - a unique event in the history of warfare - to be a textbook victory based on tactical surprise. They had no idea that the British, using Ultra intercepts, knew their plans and had laid a carefully-planned trap. It should have been the first German defeat of the war, but a fatal misunderstanding turned the battle round. Nor did the conflict end there. Ferocious Cretan freedom fighters mounted a heroic resistance, aided by a dramatic cast of British officers from Special Operations Executive.
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Chin Up, Girls!

By Katharine Ramsay, Georgia Powell
Authors:
Katharine Ramsay, Georgia Powell
From the self-styled 'Queen of Soho' who sued BA, claiming to have been bitten on the bottom by a flea, to the butcher's daughter from Oldham who performed topless as 'the world's strongest woman' before becoming becoming the mistress of a peer whom she met while living in a Pyrennean mountain hut, this is a celebration of the women who refused to fulfil society's expectations. Their company includes the woman who survived four months adrift in a dinghy in the Pacific and the woman who played professional polo disguised as a man for fifteen years, as well as the inimitable Dame Barbara Cartland and Fanny Cradock. And there are over one hundred more.This is the first time that the Daily Telegraph has dedicated a book to women's stories; very few of the women featured were 'celebrities', yet their stories represent a century of progress and change, capturing the spirit of those who came of age between Emancipation and the Equal Opportunities Act, whether high life or low life, pioneers or bluestockings.Taking its title from the inspiring lines of a matron whose nurses faced a WWII firing squad, this is a fascinating portrayal of unforgettable and extraordinary characters united by their refusal to accept society's constraints.
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The Collected Poems of George Mackay Brown

By Brian Murray, Ed. Archie Bevan
Authors:
Brian Murray, Ed. Archie Bevan
George Mackay Brown is recognised as one of Scotland's greatest twentieth-century lyric poets. His work is integral to the flowering of Scottish literature over the last fifty years. Admired by many fellow poets, including Seamus Heaney and Douglas Dunn, his poems are deeply individual and unmistakable in their setting: 'the small green world' of the Orkney Islands where he lived for most of his life with its elemental forces of sea and sky and Norse and Icelandic ancestry, is brought vividly and memorably to life. Here, his rich resonant poetry is collected in one volume, making available again many poems that are otherwise out of print.
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Constantinople

By Philip Mansel
Authors:
Philip Mansel
Philip Mansel's highly acclaimed history of Constantinople (formerly known as Byzantium) absorbingly charts the interaction between the vibrantly cosmopolitan capital - the city of the world's desire - and its ruling family. In 1453, Mehmed the Conqueror entered Constantinople on a white horse, beginning an Ottoman love affair with the city that lasted until 1924, when the last Caliph hurriedly left on the Orient Express. For almost five centuries Constantinople, with its enormous racial and cultural diversity, was the centre of the dramatic and often depraved story of an extraordinary dynasty.
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Cage of Stars

By Jacquelyn Mitchard
Authors:
Jacquelyn Mitchard
A beautiful late autumn day, an innocent game of hide-and-seek . . . but when twelve-year-old Ronnie Swan emerges from her hiding-place, she finds the brutally murdered bodies of her two little sisters. Nearby, a complete stranger covered in blood, sits sobbing on the family picnic table. The killer, Scott Early, is schizophrenic. And although her parents somehow find the strength to forgive him, Ronnie cannot. Over the years, calmly, systematically, she plans her revenge. But as she closes in on Early, Ronnie will discover the true meaning of sin and compassion - and her decision will change her and her family's lives for ever.
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The Colour of Blood

By Declan Hughes
Authors:
Declan Hughes
Emily Howard is nineteen years old, slim and petite with a pale complexion and a red rose tattoo. She is also missing. She disappeared three days ago, and now her father has been sent photographs of her naked body. He is desperate to find her.So he calls Ed Loy, a private investigator who knows the dark streets of Dublin better than most; a man who will find Emily Howard within twenty-four hours. But locating Emily turns out to be only the beginning. Within hours, Emily's ex-boyfriend is found murdered, and Loy finds himself in a race against time to catch a killer - and to unearth the many dark secrets the Howard family have kept long buried.
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Charge!

By Justin Pollard
Authors:
Justin Pollard
War brings out the very best and worst in people although, frankly, its usually the latter. But for all our thousands of years of practice at this most dangerous art there is precious little evidence that we're either outgrowing it or getting any good at it. It is an occupation filled with heroism, genius, hubris, idiocy and blind panic all bought on at least in part by large measures of astonishingly good and bad luck - and they're all here in Charge! This is not a book filled with battle diagrams swarming with arrows or 100,000 word descriptions of the tactical basis for the Pastry War. It is a book about the smaller tragedies and triumphs that actually go to make up the big picture - toilets that sink U-boats, unsporting attacks on Christmas day, armies that stop for tea, bombs on renegade balloons, drunk generals, blind kings, blind drunk generals, circular warships, and all the joy and misery that such things bring with them. And an interesting bit about the Pastry War.
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Cityboy: 50 Ways to Survive the Crunch

By Geraint Anderson
Authors:
Geraint Anderson
Are you embarrassed that you can no longer fly off in your private jet to Barbados for Christmas? Downright mortified you can't pay for your wife's much-needed facelift? Humiliated that you can no longer afford to snort cocaine off a prostitute's backside? Well, have no fear, for Cityboy instructs you how to come to terms with your newly reduced financial circumstances without losing face (substitute talcum powder for charlie). Aided by helpful drawings and diagrams, he explains how to keep your job and your partner (send her out caroling to pay for Christmas dinner), or, failing that, find new ones. Finally, he shows you how to save cash whilst giving the impression that you're actually living a more luxurious life than ever before (photoshop photos of your kids onto some exotic backdrop and past liberally over facebook).
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The Creator's Map

By Emilio Calderón
Authors:
Emilio Calderón
Rome, October 1952. The architect Jose Maria Hurtado and his wife Montserrat open their newspaper to find that their friend Prince Junio Vivarini, Fascist and Nazi-sympathizer, has been found dead, decapitated in the Swiss Alps. In the event of his death, they had been told they would receive a mysterious package containing secrets he could not reveal while living.Who was the Prince? And why were Hurtado and his wife chosen as the repository of these documents? The answers lie in Rome, in the past, during the tumultuous period of the 1930s and 1940s from the beginning of the Spanish Civil War to the end of the Second World War. For there an exiled Spanish architect, a passionate and beautiful young aristocratic librarian and an elegant and influential Fascist prince became enmeshed in a web of political intrigue, love and deceit involving a fateful map with the power to destroy them all.Part love story, part espionage novel and part mystery, The Creator's Map brilliantly recreates the dark intrigue, romantic entanglements and divided loyalties of war-torn Europe.
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Cityboy: Beer and Loathing in the Square Mile

By Geraint Anderson
Authors:
Geraint Anderson
CITYBOY is Geraint Anderson's bestselling exposé of life in the City of London.In this no-holds-barred, warts-and-all account of life in London's financial heartland, Cityboy breaks the Square Mile's code of silence, revealing tricks of the trade and the corrupt, murky underbelly at the heart of life in the City. Drawing on his experience as a young analyst in a major investment bank, the six-figure bonuses, monstrous egos, and the everyday culture of verbal and substance abuse that fuels the world's money markets are brutally exposed as Cityboy describes his ascent up the hierarchy of this intensely competitive and morally dubious industry, and how it almost cost him his sanity.
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Creation

By Randal Keynes
Authors:
Randal Keynes
Annie was Charles and Emma Darwin's adored first daughter. Her death at the age of ten broke their hearts. At the time, Darwin was working secretly on his theory of evolution and the pain of his daughter's death sharpened his conviction that natural laws have nothing to do with divine intervention. But he became racked with anxiety about his ground-breaking theories in The Origin of Species, and the controversy they would cause.As Darwin's theories continue to shape so much of our thinking about human nature today, Creation gives us fresh insight into the private life of a man who viewed the world in a new and extraordinary way.
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The Chapel at the Edge of the World

By Kirsten Mckenzie
Authors:
Kirsten Mckenzie
Emilio and Rosa are childhood sweethearts, engaged to be married. But it is 1942 and the war has taken Emilio far from Italy, to a tiny Orkney island where he is a POW. Rosa must wait for him to return and help her mother run the family hotel on the shores of Lake Como, in Italy.Feeling increasingly frustrated with his situation, Emilio is inspired by the idea of building a chapel on the barren island. The prisoners band together to create an extraordinary building out of little more than salvaged odds and ends and homemade paints. Whilst Emilio's chapel will remain long after the POW camp has been left to the sheep, will his love for Rosa survive the hardships of war and separation? For Rosa is no longer the girl that he left behind. She is being drawn further into the Italian resistance movement and closer to danger, as friendships and allegiances are ever complicated by the war.Human perseverance and resilience are at the heart of this strong debut and the small Italian chapel remains, as it does in reality on the island of Lamb's Holm, as a symbol of these qualities.
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Cry Havoc

By Joe Maiolo
Authors:
Joe Maiolo
The arms race, on the run up to the Second World War, followed the faultless logic of paranoia. Before the First World War, the Great Powers measured the strength of their rivals by comparing the size of armies and navies, and the money spent on them. Afterwards, having learned the lessons of 'total war', they looked at the capacity of nations to mobilise their economies and populations for war. Deep planning, they realised, was necessary to prepare for potential conflicts; but with this attitude came a sense that society might need to be in a state of perpetual readiness for conflict, and a potential openness to totalitarian levels of state control in ensuring that readiness. In Cry Havoc Joe Maiolo shows, in rich and fascinating detail, how the arms race between the Great Powers developed. Where previous histories have looked at how individual nations responded to the challenges of the time, Maiolo reveals the full complexity of the arms race by looking at competition between nations, at how nations reacted to the moves of their rivals. Maiolo provides a vivid portrait of the thinking of those making the key decisions - of the thinking of Hitler, Mussolini, Chamberlain, Stalin, Roosevelt - and reveals the full extent of the dilemmas confronted by the leaders of the western democracies, who seemed at times to be faced with a choice between defending their nations and preserving the essential democratic nature of the societies they sought to defend. Cry Havoc is an absorbing account of a time of extreme tensions, showing how the deadly game of the arms race led, ultimately, to an unleashing of the dogs of war.
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The Children who Fought Hitler

By Sue Elliott, James Fox
Authors:
Sue Elliott, James Fox
Few people know that Ypres, centre of First World War remembrance, was once home to a thriving British community that played a heroic role in the Second World War. This expatriate outpost grew around the British ex-servicemen who cared for the war memorials and cemeteries of 'Flanders Fields'. Many married local women and their children grew up multi-lingual, but attended their own school and were intensely proud to be British. When Germany invaded in 1940 the community was threatened: some children managed to escape, others were not so lucky. But, armed with their linguistic skills and local knowledge, pupils of the British Memorial School were uniquely prepared to fight Hitler in occupied territory and from Britain. Still in their teens, some risked capture, torture and death in intelligence and resistance operations in the field. An exceptional patriotism spurred them on to feats of bravery in this new conflict. Whilst their peers at home were being evacuated to the English countryside, these children were directly exposed to danger in one of the major theatres of war.James Fox was a pupil at the British Memorial School in 1940 and he has made it his mission to trace his former school friends. The Children Who Fought Hitler is their story: a war story about people from an unusual community, told from a fresh and human perspective.Gardens of Stone: My Boyhood in the French Resistance, published recently by Hodder & Stoughton, tells the story of one of James's former school friends, Stephen Grady, and his role in the French Resistance.
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City of Lost Girls

By Declan Hughes
Authors:
Declan Hughes
In LA there's a killer on the loose. He kills young and rootless girls and he always kills in threes. Back in Dublin, Ed Loy, happy in a new relationship, is reunited with Jack Donovan, a film director friend from LA with a turbulent personal history. When the third young female extra fails to show for work on Jack's movie, Loy begins to suspect Jack. And when the previous victims of the 'Three-in-One Killer' are discovered in LA at locations Jack used for his movies, Loy's suspicion hardens. Loy flies to LA to liaise with the LAPD on their investigation. He must find something in his and Jack's shared past that can point to the killer, and hope against hope that whatever he finds will point away from his old friend.And then, when he finally unearths the truth, it looks like it may be too late. Back in Dublin, the 'Three-in-One Killer' has broken his pattern, broken cover and struck at Ed Loy where he is most vulnerable. Time is not on Loy's side as he mounts a desperate fight to outwit a ruthless psychopath and save the last of the lost girls.
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The Captain's Wife

By Kirsten Mckenzie
Authors:
Kirsten Mckenzie
1762. Mary is desperate to escape her embittered mother. So when her marriage to a prosperous sea captain is arranged, she embraces the damp salt air, cramped conditions and bad food. She sets sail on the Isabella, away from the land of her childhood towards unseen places and an unknown future.But being the captain's wife is going to be harder than she thought. Her husband is still grieving for his first wife, and Mary can't ignore her feelings towards another man onboard. Through him, she has a taste of the kind of love she might have known, and even begins to think that escape is possible. With ruthless pirates patrolling British waters and ports full of outcasts with unspoken pasts, Mary learns quickly that loyalties are always shifting and people are rarely as they first seem. The Captain's Wife is a richly realised story of adventure about a strong young woman determined to survive her fate by a wonderful storyteller.
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Celebrate

By Lucia Van Der Post
Authors:
Lucia Van Der Post
The queen of style leads us through a year of celebrations.Pushing the boat out for a special occasion takes time, planning and a touch of magic. Author of Things I Wish Mother Had Told Me, Lucia van der Post, will show you how to make the most of events such as birthdays, weddings and Christmas. Life is too short not to make those key moments as special as possible. Whether you are organising a picnic in the park, a day at Ascot or a Bonfire night extravaganza, Celebrate is a wonderful source of inspiration and practical advice.
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The Calcutta Chromosome

By Amitav Ghosh
Authors:
Amitav Ghosh
In this extraordinary novel, Amitav Ghosh navigates through time and genres to present a unique tale. Beginning at an unspecified time in the future and ranging back to the late nineteenth century, the reader follows the adventures of the enigmatic L. Murugan. An authority on the Nobel Prize-winning scientist Sir Ronald Ross, who solved the malaria puzzle in Calcutta in 1898, Murugan is in search of the elusive 'Calcutta Chromosome'.With its astonishing range of characters, advanced computer science, religious cults and wonderful portraits of Victorian and contemporary India, The Calcutta Chromosome expands the scope of the novel as we know it, as Amitav Ghosh takes on the avatar of a science thriller writer.
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The Circle of Reason

By Amitav Ghosh
Authors:
Amitav Ghosh
A saga of flight and pursuit, this novel chronicles the adventures of Alu, a young weaver who is wrongly suspected of being a terrorist. Chased from Bengal to Bombay and on through the Persian Gulf to North Africa by a bird-watching police inspector, Alu encounters along the way a cast of characters as various and as colourful as the epithets with which the author adorns them. The reader is drawn into their lives by incidents tender and outrageous and all compellingly told. Ghosh is as natural a weaver of words as Alu is of cloth, deftly interlacing humour and wisdom to produce a narrative tapestry of surpassing beauty.
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