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New Memoir

By Trevor Noah
Authors:
Trevor Noah
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  • No Tomorrow

    By Luke Jennings
    Authors:
    Luke Jennings
    The basis for KILLING EVE, now a major BBC TV series, starring Sandra Oh SUNDAY TIMES Thriller of the MonthIn a hotel room in Venice, where she's just completed a routine assassination, Villanelle receives a late-night call. Eve Polastri has discovered that a senior MI5 officer is in the pay of the Twelve, and is about to debrief him. As Eve interrogates her subject, desperately trying to fit the pieces of the puzzle together, Villanelle moves in for the kill. The duel between the two women intensifies, as does their mutual obsession, and when the action moves from the high passes of the Tyrol to the heart of Russia, Eve finally begins to unwrap the enigma of her adversary's true identity.Codename Villanelle, the first of the Killing Eve series, is out now! Praise for Killing Eve TV series'A dazzling thriller . . . mightily entertaining' Guardian 'Entertaining, clever and darkly comic' New York Times
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    Nobody Walks

    By Mick Herron
    Authors:
    Mick Herron
    'A first-rate modern thriller' Daily MailShortlisted for the CWA Ian Fleming Steel Dagger AwardTom Bettany is working at a meat processing plant in France when he gets a voicemail from an Englishwoman he doesn't know telling him that his estranged 26-year-old son is dead - Liam Bettany fell from his London balcony, where he was smoking pot.Now for the first time since he cut all ties years ago, Bettany returns home to London to find out the truth about his son's death. Maybe it's the guilt he feels about losing touch with Liam that's gnawing at him, or maybe he's actually put his finger on a labyrinthine plot, but either way he'll get to the bottom of the tragedy, no matter whose feathers he has to ruffle. But more than a few people are interested to hear Bettany is back in town, from incarcerated mob bosses to those in the highest echelons of MI5. He might have thought he'd left it all behind when he first skipped town, but nobody ever really walks away.
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    New Scientist: The Origin of (almost) Everything

    By Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel
    Authors:
    Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton
    Illustrated by:
    Jennifer Daniel
    Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking.When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?Every society has stories about the origin of the cosmos and its inhabitants, but now, with the power to peer into the early universe and deploy the knowledge gleaned from archaeology, geology, evolutionary biology and cosmology, we are closer than ever to understanding where it all came from. In The Origin of (almost) Everything, New Scientist explores the modern origin stories of everything from the Big Bang, meteorites and dark energy, to dinosaurs, civilisation, timekeeping, belly-button fluff and beyond.From how complex life evolved on Earth, to the first written language, to how humans conquered space, The Origin of (almost) Everything offers a unique history of the past, present and future of our universe.
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  • No Dominion

    By Louise Welsh
    Authors:
    Louise Welsh
    'A vivid, action-packed journey through a post-apocalyptic world. Terrifying and touching in equal measure, the novel is a love story, an adventure, a road movie, a family drama and a murder mystery rolled into one' The Times ScotlandIt is seven years after the Sweats wiped out most of the world's population. Survivors settled on the Orkney Islands are trying to build a new society but their world crashes for a second time when the islands' teenagers vanish. Stevie and Magnus are the only ones who can bring them home.Stevie hasn't been back to the mainland since she escaped to the islands after a desperate flight north from London. Magnus never saw himself leaving either. After all, what's left for him there? But Shug was born on the islands and has never known anything different; has never left them. Until now.And what starts out as a journey to bring home some young people intent on adventure soon turns into a race against time to find Shug before he comes down with the Sweats. Or worse. A pacy, page-turning ride through a post-apocalyptic world, No Dominion sets the pulse racing and doesn't let up until the last thrilling page.
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    Natural Histories

    By Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
    Authors:
    Brett Westwood, Stephen Moss
    Prepare to dive to the depths of the sea with 100-foot-long giant squid, travel through space after the meteorites shooting into our atmosphere and join a dangerous expedition to Antarctica to find the Emperor Penguin egg. Discover fleas dressed by nuns, a defeated prince hiding from his enemies in an oak tree and the plant whose legendary screams could drive you mad . . .Accompanying Radio 4's acclaimed six-month series with the Natural History Museum, Natural Histories tells the riveting stories of how our relationships with twenty-five unexpected creatures have permanently changed the way we see the world. Packed full of fascinating science, history and folklore, this beautiful book brings you face to face with nature, in all its wonder, complexity and invention.Fresh from winning the Thomson Reuters prize for Tweet of the Day, Brett Westwood and Stephen Moss have written another imaginative and inspiring book. Each chapter explores a different species or phenomena, often taking a fascinating object in the museum's collection as a starting point. From rock pools and blackberry picking to a shipwreck thousands of miles from land; and from David Attenborough on gorillas to Monty Python on dinosaurs, this is a book for anyone curious about the world we live in. You'll never take nature for granted again.
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    Nothing

    Zero, zip, nada, zilch. It's all too easy to ignore the fascinating possibilities of emptiness and non-existence, and we may well wonder what there is to say about nothing. But scientists have known for centuries that nothing is the key to understanding absolutely everything, from why particles have mass to the expansion of the universe; without nothing we'd be precisely nowhere. With chapters by 22 science writers, including top names such as Ian Stewart, Marcus Chown, Helen Pilcher, Nigel Henbest, Michael Brooks, Linda Geddes, Paul Davies, Jo Marchant and David Fisher, this fascinating and intriguing book revels in a subject that has tantalised the finest minds for centuries, and shows there's more to nothing than meets the eye.
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    No Better Friend

    By Robert Weintraub
    Authors:
    Robert Weintraub
    An extraordinary tale of the remarkable bond between one man and his dog during the Second World War.The two friends huddled close together, each of them the other's saving grace in a world gone to hell . . . There was nothing terribly unusual about POWs suffering horribly at the hands of their Japanese captors. All across the Pacific theatre, Allied captives were experiencing similar punishment. But there was one thing unusual about this particular duo of prisoners.One of them was a dog.Flight technician Frank Williams and Judy, a purebred pointer, met in the most unlikely of places: a World War II internment camp. Judy was a fiercely loyal dog, with a keen sense for who was friend and who was foe, and the pair's relationship deepened throughout their captivity. When the prisoners suffered beatings, Judy would repeatedly risk her life to intervene. She survived bombings and other near-death experiences and became a beacon not only for Frank but for all the men, who saw in her survival a flicker of hope for their own. Using a wealth of new material including interviews with those who knew Frank and Judy, letters and firsthand accounts, Robert Weintraub expertly weaves a narrative of an unbreakable bond forged in the worst circumstances. Judy's devotion to the men she was interned with, including a host of characters from all around the world, from Australia to the UK, was so powerful that reports indicate she might have been the only dog spared in these camps - and their care for her helped keep them alive. At one point, deep in despair and starvation, Frank contemplated killing himself and the dog to prevent either from watching the other die. But both were rescued, and Judy spent the rest of her life with Frank. She became the war's only official canine POW, and after she died at the age of fourteen, Frank couldn't bring himself to ever have another dog. Their story of friendship and survival is one of the great sagas of World War II.
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    A Nick Drake Companion

    By Pete Paphides
    Authors:
    Pete Paphides
    This short book, taken from Remembered For A While, tells the stories and circumstances that surround every known recording in Nick Drake's canon (as well as a few unrecorded songs). The result is like a detailed, extended series of liner notes, something to read while sitting in your favourite chair, in your favourite room, listening to the imperishably beautiful music they describe. A Nick Drake companion.
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    Northern Lights

    By George Mackay Brown
    Authors:
    George Mackay Brown
    Many of the places, people, legends and seasons that formed Brown's vision and work are presented here, with poems appearing among the prose. Included are memoirs of his parents, friends and passing strangers with legends and stories of the places.
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    The New Digital Age

    By Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen
    Authors:
    Eric Schmidt, Jared Cohen
    'This is the most important - and fascinating - book yet written about how the digital age will affect our world' Walter Isaacson, author of Steve JobsFrom two leading thinkers, the widely anticipated book that describes a new, hugely connected world of the future, full of challenges and benefits which are ours to meet and harness. The New Digital Age is the product of an unparalleled collaboration: full of the brilliant insights of one of Silicon Valley's great innovators - what Bill Gates was to Microsoft and Steve Jobs was to Apple, Schmidt (along with Larry Page and Sergey Brin) was to Google - and the Director of Google Ideas, Jared Cohen, formerly an advisor to both Secretaries of State Condoleezza Rice and Hillary Clinton. Never before has the future been so vividly and transparently imagined. From technologies that will change lives (information systems that greatly increase productivity, safety and our quality of life, thought-controlled motion technology that can revolutionise medical procedures, and near-perfect translation technology that allows us to have more diversified interactions) to our most important future considerations (curating our online identity and fighting those who would do harm with it) to the widespread political change that will transform the globe (through transformations in conflict, increasingly active and global citizenries, a new wave of cyber-terrorism and states operating simultaneously in the physical and virtual realms) to the ever present threats to our privacy and security, Schmidt and Cohen outline in great detail and scope all the promise and peril awaiting us in the coming decades. A breakthrough book - pragmatic, inspirational and totally fascinating. Whether a government, a business or an individual, we must understand technology if we want to understand the future.'A brilliant guidebook for the next century . . . Schmidt and Cohen offer a dazzling glimpse into how the new digital revolution is changing our lives' Richard Branson
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  • Northanger Abbey (flipback edition)

    Published for the first time in flipback - the new, portable, stylish format that's taken Europe by storm.'What have you been judging from... Dearest Miss Morland, what ideas have you been admitting?'Young and impressionable, Catherine Morland has an over-active imagination. After falling for the sophisticated Henry Tilney during a stay at Bath, she is invited to stay at his family home, the sinister-sounding Northanger Abbey. There, influenced by lurid Gothic novels, she imagines darkness and intrigue at every corner. Catherine must learn to distinguish between fiction and reality if she is to find the path to true love.Jane Austen's funniest, most optimistic novel is published for the first time in flipback classics - so now you can always carry an Austen in your pocket.
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    The Newgate Jig

    By Ann Featherstone
    Authors:
    Ann Featherstone
    A hanging always draws a crowd. But not everyone there has come to jeer at the condemned man. George Kevill's young son Barney is in the front row, and he knows his father is innocent. There are others there who know George is innocent, too - and the men who set him up have every reason to want to silence his boy . . .Narrowly escaping the clutches of the sinister Nasty Man, young Barney finds sanctuary at the London Aquarium amongst his father's bohemian friends: Bob Chapman, whose performing dogs Brutus and Nero astonish audiences every night, the exquisite doll-lady, Princess Tiny, and her admirer, the giant Herr Swann. Together with Fortinbras Horatio Trimmer, aspiring novelist and meantime author of penny dreadfuls and popular plays, they will protect Barney and seek to uncover the conspiracy behind a dark secret that lies at the heart of the Victorian establishment.
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    Night of the Living Dad

    By Sam Delaney
    Authors:
    Sam Delaney
    A mop of black hair, wrinkled skin, a blueish-grey complexion and pretty, open eyes that dart around the room. You could call her scary and weird-looking I suppose but I quite like her.Sam Delaney is happy: he is a new dad. He plans to be a caring, wise and reliable father.Except he worries he might be none of those things. He worries that he might be an idiot. His nieces and nephews see him as a lovable buffoon. He is a clumsy oaf and sporadic binge-drinker who doesn't have a proper job and cites 'Teen Wolf's dad' as his biggest role model. Is he really fit for this new position of responsibility?There's only one way he'll be able to find out. Follow Sam in his first year of fatherhood as he tries to figure out what a good dad should be, and, even more importantly, what sort of dad he should be.
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    Night in Tunisia

    By Neil Jordan
    Authors:
    Neil Jordan
    Set in the seaside towns of Ireland, within the tiled Victorian walls of Kensal Rise Baths, in Dublin on the day de Valera is buried, these stunning stories narrate the powerful rites of passage that form our lives - the end of childhood, the moment of death, the end of a love affair. They reveal for the first time the extraordinary imagination and insight that characterises both the fiction and films of Neil Jordan.
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    Nathaniel's Nutmeg

    By Giles Milton
    Authors:
    Giles Milton
    In 1616, an English adventurer, Nathaniel Courthope, stepped ashore on a remote island in the East Indies on a secret mission - to persuade the islanders of Run to grant a monopoly to England over their nutmeg, a fabulously valuable spice in Europe. This infuriated the Dutch, who were determined to control the world's nutmeg supply. For five years Courthope and his band of thirty men were besieged by a force one hundred times greater - and his heroism set in motion the events that led to the founding of the greatest city on earth.A beautifully told adventure story and a fascinating depiction of exploration in the seventeenth century, NATHANIEL'S NUTMEG sheds a remarkable light on history.
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    Now We Are Sixty

    By Christopher Matthew
    Authors:
    Christopher Matthew
    When Christopher Matthew was six, the poems of Milne always reassured him that other children were as naughty as he was, so on reaching sixty he decided that he should adapt Now We Are Six for an older audience.Now We Are Sixty is often hilarious, sometimes rueful and always thought-provoking. Some verses are about realising we are not as young as we thought, while some are about the more disconcerting problems of modern life; mobile telephones on trains, anti-social behaviour, traffic jams and the internet.
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