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How to Survive the End of the World (When it's in Your Own Head)

By Aaron Gillies
Authors:
Aaron Gillies
'Fast-paced, amusing and insightful' Guardian'Just the laugh you need for when everything seems terrible.' Evening Standard'A brilliant and funny read for the apocalyptically-minded' Matt Haig, author of Reasons to Stay Alive'In a sea of books about mental health, it stands out for its humour, wisdom and lightness of touch' Adam Kay, author of This is Going to HurtThere are plenty of books out there on how to survive a zombie apocalypse, all-out nuclear war, or Armageddon. But what happens when it feels like the world is ending every single time you wake up? That's what having anxiety is like - and How to Survive the End of the World is here to help. Or at least make you feel like you're not so alone.From helping readers identify the enemy, to safeguarding the vulnerable areas of their lives, Aaron Gillies will examine the impact of anxiety, and give readers some tools to fight back - whether with medication, therapy, CBT, coping techniques, or simply with a dark sense of humour.'I LOVED it because it's good to know that I'm not the only one pretending everything's fine, even when everything is fine' Juno Dawson, author of The Gender Games'Hilarious and deeply insightful' Dean Burnett, author of The Idiot Brain
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Happier at Home

By Gretchen Rubin
Authors:
Gretchen Rubin
In The Happiness Project, she worked out general theories of happiness. Here she goes deeper on factors that matter for home, such as possessions, marriage, time and parenthood. How can she control the cubicle in her pocket? How might she spotlight her family's treasured possessions? And it really was time to replace that dud toaster.And what does she want from her home? A place that calms her, and energises her. A place that, by making her feel safe, will free her to take risks. Also, while Rubin wants to be happier at home, she wants to appreciate how much happiness is there already.So, starting in September (the new January), Rubin dedicates a school year - September through May - to making her home a place of greater simplicity, comfort and love. Each month, Rubin tackles a different theme as she experiments with concrete, manageable resolutions - and this time, she coaxes her family to try some resolutions, as well. With her signature blend of memoir, science, philosophy and experimentation, Rubin's passion for her subject jumps off the page, and reading just a few chapters of this book will inspire readers to find more happiness in their own lives.
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