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The Last of the Greenwoods

By Clare Morrall
Authors:
Clare Morrall
In a field outside Bromsgrove, two elderly brothers live in adjoining railway carriages. No one visits and they never speak to each other. Until the day Zohra Dasgupta, a young postwoman, delivers an extraordinary letter - from a woman claiming to be the sister they thought had been murdered fifty years earlier. So begins an intriguing tale: is this woman an impostor? If she's not, what did happen all those years ago? And why are the brothers such recluses? Then there's Zohra. Once a bright, outgoing teenager, the only friend she will see from her schooldays is laidback Crispin, who has roped her in to the restoration of an old railway line on his father's land. For which, as it happens, they need some carriages . . . With wry humour and a cast of characters as delightful as they are damaged, Clare Morrall tells an engrossing story of past misdeeds and present reckoning, which shows that for all the wrong turnings we might take, sometimes it is possible to retrace our steps.
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Lost and Found

By Jules Montague
Authors:
Jules Montague
*Irish Bestseller**Telegraph bestseller* An unforgettable book for fans of Henry Marsh and Atul Gawande about how we lose ourselves and those around us - and how we can be found again.Who do we become when our minds misbehave? If a loved one changes as a result of a brain disorder, are they still the same person? Could a brain disorder enhance your identity rather than damage it? From dementia and brain injury to sleep disorders, coma, and multiple personality disorder, leading neurologist and journalist Dr Jules Montague explores what remains of the person left behind when the pieces of their mind go missing. Along the way she answers fascinating questions about how we remember, think and behave. Why do some memories endure and others fade? Why do you sometimes forget why you went into a room? And what if rather than losing memories, your mind creates false ones - are they still yours, and do they still make you, you?'This is a book for anyone wanting to understand the human brain and personhood; it is a book for anyone with a loved one with dementia and for those of us who fear dementia... Montague takes the reader on an exquisite journey into the human brain and beyond that, to the metaphysics of personhood... Occasionally we come across a physicist or economist who, despite their subject matter, can stop you in your tracks. They reel you in without you realising. Montague is a neurologist who does exactly that. She has a rare gift: she makes her craft look simple... Throughout this book Montague displays a maturity and wisdom not always observed in clinicians or indeed any other kind of human.' Irish Times'A profoundly moving, revelatory book... Like the late Oliver Sacks, Jules Montague writes about bizarre cases. ...And yet, she is also writing about what it is to be human and the surprising fragility of our sense of self.' Daily Mail
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Letter Composed During a Lull in the Fighting

By Kevin Powers
Authors:
Kevin Powers
Shortlisted for the 2014 TS Eliot PrizeShortlisted for the 2014 Forward Prize for Best First CollectionPoetry Book Society ChoiceIn this remarkable debut poetry collection, National Book Award finalist and Iraq war veteran Kevin Powers creates a startling, affecting portrait of a life shaped by war. LETTER COMPOSED DURING A LULL IN THE FIGHTING captures the many moments that comprise a soldier's life: driving down the Texas highway; waiting for the unknown in the dry Iraq heat; writing a love letter; listening to a mother recount her dreams. Written with honesty and insight, these poems strive to make sense of war and its echoes through human experience.Just as THE YELLOW BIRDS was hailed as the 'first literary masterpiece produced by the Iraq war,' (Los Angeles Times) this collection will prove to be a powerful, enduring classic.
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Lollipop

By Marc Pye
Authors:
Marc Pye
Life for Evelyn, Mick and their five-year-old son Jamie is relatively trouble free - until Evelyn's brother Shug comes to stay. Shug is a typical Buckfast-drinking, living-for-the-moment Glasgow guy whose chosen professions are car theft and robbery. The only person Shug genuinely cares about is his nephew Jamie. So when he suspects the local lollipop man of child abuse he takes the law into his own hands. Soon both the police and the local hard-men are on Shug's trail. But, with his chameleon ways and lucky streak he narrowly manages to avoid ending up either in prison or at the bottom of the river Clyde wearing concrete shoes.
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Living, Thinking, Looking

By Siri Hustvedt
Authors:
Siri Hustvedt
From the internationally bestselling author of What I Loved and The Summer Without Men, a dazzling collection of essays written with Siri Hustvedt's customary intelligence, wit and ability to convey complex ideas in a clear and lively way.Divided into three sections - Living, which draws on Siri's own life; Thinking, on memory, emotion and the imagination; and Looking, on art and artists - the essays range across the humanities and science as Siri explores how we see, remember, feel and interact with others, what it means to sleep, dream and speak, and what we mean by 'self'. The combination offers a profound and fascinating insight into ourselves as thinking, feeling beings.
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Lucky Bunny

By Jill Dawson
Authors:
Jill Dawson
Crime's a man's business. So they say. Who was that small figure then, slender enough to trot along the moonlit track, swift and low, virtually invisible? Who was it that covered the green signal with a glove to stop the train, while the two others took care of the driver and his mate? Could it have been one Queenie Dove, survivor of the Depression and the Blitz, not to mention any number of scrapes with the law?Queenie Dove is a self-proclaimed genius when it comes to thieving and escape. Daring, clever and sexy, she ducked and dived through the streets of London from the East End through Soho to Mayfair, graduating from childhood shop-lifting to more glamorous crimes in the post-war decades. So was she wicked through and through, or more sinned against than sinning? Here she tells a vivacious tale of trickery and adventure, but one with more pain and heartbreak than its heroine cares to admit. Yes, luck often favoured her, but that is only part of the story.
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The Life of an Unknown Man

By Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
Authors:
Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
One night in St Petersburg, two men meet, both adrift in the brash new Russia: Shutov, a writer visiting after years of exile in Paris, and Volsky, an elderly survivor of the Siege of Leningrad and Stalin's purges. His life story - one of extreme suffering, courage and an extraordinary love - he considers unremarkable. To Shutov it is a revelation, the tale of an unsung hero that puts everything into perspective and suggests where true happiness lies.
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A Long Long Time Ago and Essentially True

By Brigid Pasulka
Authors:
Brigid Pasulka
Winner of the 2010 Hemingway Foundation/PEN Award for a distinguished first book of fiction, A Long Long Time Ago and Essentially True is a grand love story and a wonderfully warm-hearted debut about a young woman and her country on the cusp of change.On the eve of World War II in a place called Half-Village, a man nicknamed the Pigeon falls in love with a girl fabled for her angelic looks. Using his 'golden hands' he decides to turn her family's modest hut into a beautiful home, and build his way into her heart.But war arrives, cutting short their charming courtship and bringing with it terrible events.Fifty years on, young Baba Yaga leaves her village to make a new life in Krakow. What she finds is not the city of her grandmother's tales but a place struggling in the aftermath of communism's fall, where opportunity seems reserved for the lucky few. Then tragedy strikes and the past reaches out an unexpected hand to her.What Louis de Bernières did for Kefalonia, Brigid Pasulka does for Poland, weaving together the two strands of her story with a deftly magical touch into a witty, wise and heartbreaking love story that will enchant you to the very end.
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The Long-Player Goodbye

By Travis Elborough
Authors:
Travis Elborough
For nearly 60 years, since the arrival of the long-playing record in 1948, the album has provided the soundtrack to our lives. Our record collections, even if they're on CD, or these days, an iPod, are personal treasure, revealing our loves, errors of jugdement and lapses in taste. Self-confessed music obsessive, Travis Elborough, explores the way in which particular albums are deeply embedded in cultural history, revered as works of art or so ubiqitous as to be almost invisible. But in the age of the iPod, when we can download an infinite number of single tracks and need never listen to a whole album ever again, does the concept of an album still mean anything? THE LONG-PLAYER GOODBYE is a brilliant piece of popular history and a celebration of the joy of records. If you've ever had a favourite album, you'll love Travis Elborough's warm and witty take on how vinyl changed our world.
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The Language of Others

By Clare Morrall
Authors:
Clare Morrall
The world is a puzzling, sometimes frightening place for Jessica Fontaine. As a child she only finds contentment in playing the piano and wandering alone in the empty spaces of Audlands Hall, the dilapidated country house where she grows up. Twenty-five years later, divorced, with her son still living at home, Jessica remains preoccupied by the desire to create space around her. Then her volatile ex-husband reappears, the first of several surprises that both transform Jessica's present and give her a startling new perspective on the past. THE LANGUAGE OF OTHERS tells the absorbing story of a woman who spends much of her life feeling that she is out of step with the real world, until she discovers why. Related with humour and compassion, it offers a fresh, illuminating insight into what it means to be normal.
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Le Testament Francais

By Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
Authors:
Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
Locked behind the Iron Curtain, a young boy grows up bewitched by his French grandmother's memories of Paris before the Great War. Yet despite what he also learns of her suffering in the Soviet Union under Stalin and during the Second World War, as an adolescent he finds himself proud to be a Russian. Torn between the two cultures, he eventually makes a choice - which has a wholly unexpected outcome. Capturing the powerful allure of illusion, this unforgettable novel traces a sentimental and intellectual journey that embraces the dramatic history of the twentieth century.
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The Little Drummer Girl

By John Le Carré
Authors:
John Le Carré
Soon to be a major TV series from the critically acclaimed team who brought you THE NIGHT MANAGER, starring BIG LITTLE LIES' Alexander Sarsgard and LADY MACBETH's Florence Pugh The Sunday Times bestseller and winner of the 1984 Edgar AwardFrom the master of spy thrillers, John le Carré, comes a thrilling, intricate tale of Middle Eastern intrigue. Charlie, a brilliant and beautiful young English actress, is seduced by Israeli intelligence officer Joseph. But this duplicitous liaison will in fact lead her to her most dangerous role yet. Forced to play decoy in a mission to ensnare an elusive Palestinian terrorist, Charlie must lead him into a delicate trap, at the risk of falling in it herself. . . Deftly navigating readers through the intricate shadow worlds of international espionage, le Carré's skill and knowledge are unsurpassed, and have earned him unprecedented worldwide acclaim. THE LITTLE DRUMMER GIRL is an electrifying and deeply moving novel, perhaps more relevant today than ever.***********'Action-packed' Sun 'There is only one le Carré' Daily Mail'An exciting story, excitingly told' Observer'One of those writers who will be read a century from now' Robert Harris'Perhaps the most significant novelist of the second half of the 20th century in Britain.' Ian McEwan
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Leaning, Leaning Over Water

By Frances Itani
Authors:
Frances Itani
The Second World War is over when Jock moves his family to Quebec, where he lives with his wife, Maura, and their three children in a small bungalow, complains about the government, and tries to teach his children about life and poetry. But beneath the unrippled domestic surface bubble the anxieties and hopes of the women in the family.Grounded in the texture of everyday life in the 1950s, and echoing the moods of the river itself, LEANING, LEANING OVER WATER recreates in luminous, compelling prose the lives of a family in a village in Canada on the banks of the Ottawa River.
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The Long Firm Trilogy

By Jake Arnott
Authors:
Jake Arnott
Ranging from the Swinging Sixties to the Raving Nineties and with a cast that includes the machiavellian gangster Harry Starks, politicians, bent coppers, actresses and gutter journalists, Arnott's fictional portrait of cultural change and moral decay is at once sharply funny, relentlessly compelling, and frighteningly real.
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Lorelei's Secret

By Carolyn Parkhurst
Authors:
Carolyn Parkhurst
'Here is what we know, those of us who can speak to tell a story: On the afternoon of October 21st, my wife, Lexy Ransome, climbed to the top of the apple tree in our back yard and fell to her death. There were no witnesses, save our dog Lorelei . . .'So begins this remarkable, unputdownable debut about a man faced with the sudden and inexplicable loss of the love of his life. Convinced that Lexy's death was not an accident, and driven by a desire to discover what really happened that October afternoon, Paul decides to embark on the only course of action he can possibly imagine. What follows is a luminous account of an extraordinary, magical love affair, and its aftermath. This is the story of a passionate woman and her irrepressible dreams; of a man who does not know how to begin to live without her; of an animal's loyalty and devotion, and of the desperate search for answers that leads them all to places they never expected to go.
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The Last Girl

By Stephan Collishaw
Authors:
Stephan Collishaw
In the dying days of the twentieth century an elderly poet wanders the streets of Vilnius, haunted by a terrible secret. His memories of the Second World War have been buried for fifty years, but now, as he picks his way through the rubble of the ghetto, and looks in the faces of young women he passes, he is reminded of the girl he once loved - and betrayed - and finds himself once again compelled to tell her story.In a decaying tenement a washerwoman struggles between the twilight world of Vilnius's brothels and her flickering hopes of building a better life for her children. Her son needs $1000 if he is to escape to England, and she knows of only one way to earn such an impossible amount of money. Her life, and the poet's, weave between each other as they both step carefully around the cracks of the past, in search of any kind of peace.And through the tangled debris of Lithuania's past and present, the story of a beautiful Jewish girl and a young poet - whose love was ultimately not strong enough to save her from the persecution of the Russians, or from the final, deadly designs of the Nazis - coils its way to the surface and demands to be told.
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A Life's Music

By Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
Authors:
Andreï Makine, Andrei Makine
In a snowbound railway station deep in the Soviet Union, a stranded passenger comes across an old man playing the piano in the dark, silent tears rolling down his cheeks. Once on the train to Moscow he begins to tell his story: a tale of loss, love and survival that movingly illustrates the strength of human resilience. 'A novella to be read in a lunch hour and remembered for ever' Jilly Cooper, Books of the Year, Sunday Telegraph
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The Long Silence of Mario Salviati

By Etienne Van Heerden
Authors:
Etienne Van Heerden
When Ingi Friedlander travels to Yearsonend in the rugged interior of South Africa to purchase a statue, its eccentric sculptor, Jonty Jack, does not want to sell - he says it was not his creation, but simply appeared miraculously. Ingi decides to stay and try to win Jonty's trust, but soon realises that the townspeople suspect she has come to seek a different treasure - the legendary wagon of gold brought in by defeated Boer soldiers. Gradually she prises open the secrets of the past, secrets of greed, racism and vaulting ambition, whose key lies with the Italian POW Mario Salviati - deaf, dumb and now blind. Watched over by a very earthy angel and long dead humans, Ingi forces a resolution with the past and faces up to her own future.
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Look at it this Way

By Justin Cartwright
Authors:
Justin Cartwright
From the moment an unemployed City broker is devoured by an escapee from the Zoo, we are embarked upon a dazzling journey through nineties' London. A city peopled by a rich and varied cast of characters - from the City, journalism, the criminal world, advertising, music hall and the East End. Lurking in the background is nemesis in the shape of a hungry lion.
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The Long Firm

By Jake Arnott
Authors:
Jake Arnott
The cult bestseller that launched Jake Arnott as one of the most exciting new voices of the decade - 'A gangster novel every bit as cool, stylish and venomous as the London in which it's set' (Independent on Sunday)'I'll tell you what happens now,' Harry says, reading my mind. 'You can go now. We're quits. You don't talk to anybody about anything. You've had a taste of what will happen if you do.'Meet Harry Starks: club owner, racketeer, porn king, sociology graduate and Judy Garland fan. To be in his orbit is to be caught up in the music, the parties, the people and the sex of London in the Swinging Sixties. But behind the rough charm and cheap glamour is a man prepared to do what it takes to get what he wants.
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