Kate Adie, (In Assoc. With Imperial, and The Imperial War Museum - Corsets To Camouflage - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Paperback £10.99
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    • ISBN:9780340820605
    • Publication date:02 Aug 2004

Corsets To Camouflage

Women and War

By Kate Adie, (In Assoc. With Imperial, and The Imperial War Museum

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Bestselling author and highly respected BBC news correspondent Kate Adie brings a century of dramatic change for women in uniform vividly to life in this newly reformatted paperback edition of her successful hardback.

'The paciest and most entertaining history book to come my way' Ian McIntyre, The Times

'Riveting and beautifully illustrated' The Lady

'Engrossing . . . far more than a sartorial survey' The Oldie

* * * * * *

A vivid history of ordinary women and their extraordinary deeds through two world wars and beyond, by From Our Own Correspondent presenter Kate Adie.

Uniform is universally seen as both a stamp of authority and of official acceptance. But the sight of a woman in military uniform still provokes controversy. Although more women are now taking prominent roles in combat, the status implied by uniform is often regarded as contrary to the general perception of womanhood.

In association with the Imperial War Museum, this is the first book to look at the image of uniformed women, both in conflict and in civilian roles throughout the twentieth century. Kate Adie examines the extraordinary range of jobs that uniformed women have performed, from nursing to the armed services. Through contemporary correspondence and many personal stories she brings the enormous and often unsung achievements of women in uniform vividly to life, and looks at how far women have come in a century which, for them, began restricted in corsets and has ended on the battlefield in camouflage.

Biographical Notes

Kate Adie became a household name through her work as the BBC`s chief news correspondent, reporting major stories and from war zones around the world. She has won numerous awards including two Royal Television Society awards, the Bafta Richard Dimbleby Award, and the Broadcasting Press Guild`s Award for Outstanding Contribution to Broadcasting. She was awarded an OBE in 1993.

Kate Adie presents From Our Own Correspondent on BBC Radio 4 and is the author of several bestselling books.

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  • ISBN: 9781848943612
  • Publication date: 02 Aug 2004
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
an engrossing history, and far more than a sartorial survey — The Oldie
the paciest and most entertaining history book to come my way. — Ian McIntyre, The Times
an engrossing history, and far more than a sartorial survey — The Oldie
the paciest and most entertaining history book to come my way. — Ian McIntyre, The Times
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Authors:
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Authors:
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Authors:
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