Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis - Dallas: 1963 - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781848547759
    • Publication date:10 Oct 2013
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    • ISBN:9781848547780
    • Publication date:03 Jul 2014

Dallas: 1963

The Road to the Kennedy Assassination

By Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis

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A ground-breaking narrative of the death of President John F. Kennedy and the city where it all took place.

In November 1963 President John F. Kennedy was assassinated in Dallas, Texas. His death remains a defining moment for millions of people but few understand the unstoppable forces that were building in the city long before this dramatic event played out before the world.

Dallas 1963 is a riveting account of the convergence of a group of unyielding and highly focused protagonists in a city sometimes seemingly filled with hate for JFK. Wicked stabs of fate and circumstance steered these fascinating characters together: the richest man in the world, a combative military general, a Mafia don, a strident Congressman, thundering preachers and even the elegant owner of one of America's most famous stores. This book expertly narrates how the spiralling events surrounding these characters on the ground in Dallas ultimately brewed a toxic environment before the President's assassination.

Using a wealth of new information, as well as the first ever examination of key primary documents, Bill Minutaglio and Steven L. Davis, both experts in their field, provide a comprehensive and detailed portrait of the place, the time and the people of these extraordinary events in American history. They also provide cautionary and controversial lessons rendering this time increasingly relevant for the modern age.

Biographical Notes

Bill Minutaglio is the author of several acclaimed books, including the first major biography of President George W. Bush. His book, City on Fire, was named one of the 'greatest tales of survival' ever written by Esquire. His work has appeared in the New York Times, Newsweek, the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists, Scotland on Sunday, the Daily Beast and many other publications. He is a professor of journalism at the University of Texas-Austin.

Steven L. Davis was born in 1963 and grew up in Dallas, Texas. He is the author of two books: Texas Literary Outlaws: Six Writers in the Sixties and Beyond and J. Frank Dobie: A Liberated Mind. Davis is a long-time curator at the Wittliff Collections at Texas State University-San Marcos, which holds the literary papers of many writers. Davis has also edited several books for publication and he is a member of the Texas Institute of Letters.

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  • ISBN: 9781848547773
  • Publication date: 10 Oct 2013
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  • Imprint: John Murray
An intriguing exploration . . . Although the authors don't specifically point the finger at Oswald or anyone else, they contend that it was Dallas's toxic, extremist environment that made an act of violence there against the president almost inevitable — Sunday Times
Casting a clinical eye over the events leading to the death that shook the world in November 1963, the acclaimed Texas journalists superbly put the shocking season at Dealey plaza into context . . . Countless attempts have been made to explain the Kennedy assassination, but few have ever tried to explain the city where it happened. For any politics or history buff, this slow-burning non-fiction thriller is a must — Irish Examiner
John Murray

Empire of Democracy

Simon Reid-Henry
Authors:
Simon Reid-Henry

Half a century ago, at the height of the Cold War and amidst a world economic crisis, the Western democracies were forced to undergo a profound transformation. Against what some saw as a full-scale "crisis of democracy" - with race riots, anti-Vietnam marches and a wave of worker discontent sowing crisis from one nation to the next - a new political-economic order was devised and the postwar social contract was torn up and written anew.In this epic narrative of the events that have shaped our own times, Simon Reid-Henry shows how liberal democracy, and western history with it, was profoundly re-imagined when the postwar Golden Age ended. As the institutions of liberal rule were reinvented, a new generation of politicians emerged: Thatcher, Reagan, Mitterrand, Kohl. The late twentieth century heyday they oversaw carried the Western democracies triumphantly to victory in the Cold War and into the economic boom of the 1990s. But equally it led them into the fiasco of Iraq, to the high drama of the financial crisis in 2007/8, and ultimately to the anti-liberal surge of our own times.The present crisis of liberalism enjoins us to revisit these as yet unscripted decades. The era we have all been living through is closing out, democracy is turning on its axis once again. As this panoramic history poignantly reminds us, the choices we make going forward require us first to come to terms with where we have been.

John Murray

Court One: The Old Bailey

Thomas Grant
Authors:
Thomas Grant

The principal criminal court of England, reserved for the most serious and high-profile cases, Court One was opened in 1907 in the Old Bailey, and witnessed the most celebrated trials and sentencing of the most famous (and infamous) defendants of the twentieth century: including Seddon, Dr Crippen, George Smith, Thompson and Bywaters, Christie, Neville Heath, Ruth Ellis, John Bodkin Adams, Penguin Books, Stephen Ward, Christine Keeler, the Kray Brothers, Peter Sutcliffe, Denis Nilson.Telling the stories of ten trials that span over eighty years, this book traces the fears, preoccupations and advances of the twentieth century. Not only notorious for murder trials, Court One recorded the changing face of modern British society, in particular our attitudes to homosexuality, the death penalty, freedom of expression, insanity and the psychology of violence. From the bestselling author of Jeremy Hutchinson's Case Histories, Court One is a mesmerising window onto the thrills, behaviours and beliefs of a period.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Death of Hitler

Jean-Christophe Brisard, Lana Parshina
Authors:
Jean-Christophe Brisard, Lana Parshina

On 30 April 1945, Hitler committed suicide in his bunker as the Red Army closed in on Berlin. Within four days the Soviets had recovered his body. But the truth about what the Russian secret services found was hidden from history when, three months later, Stalin officially declared to Churchill and Truman that Hitler was still alive and had escaped abroad. Doubts began to spread like gangrene and continue, even today, to feed wild fantasies about what really happened to him.In 2017, after two years of painstaking negotiations with the Russian authorities, award-winning investigative journalists Jean-Christophe Brisard and Lana Parshina gained access to confidential Soviet files that finally revealed the truth about the incredible hunt for Hitler's body.Their investigation includes new eyewitness accounts of Hitler's final days, exclusive photographic evidence and interrogation records, and exhaustive research into the absurd power struggle that ensued between the Soviet, British and American intelligence agencies. And for the first time since the end of the Second World War, authorised cutting-edge forensic tests are carried out on the human remains recovered from the bunker - a piece of skull with traces of the lethal bullet; a fragment of jaw bone and teeth. In this fascinating investigation as thrilling as any spy novel, Brisard and Parshina debunk all previous conspiracy theories about the death of the Führer. With breathtaking precision and immediacy, they penetrate one of the most powerful and controversial secret services on earth to take us inside the final hours of Hitler's bunker - and solve the most notorious cold case in history.

Hodder & Stoughton

Death in Ten Minutes

Fern Riddell
Authors:
Fern Riddell
Hodder Paperbacks

Coretta: My Life, My Love, My Legacy

Coretta Scott King, Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds
Authors:
Coretta Scott King, Rev. Dr. Barbara Reynolds

'Coretta is more relevant today than ever . . . a female who takes responsibility for creating something better in the time she has and the space she has to occupy: that is true greatness. And Coretta did that.' Maya AngelouBorn in 1927 in the Deep South, Coretta Scott always felt called to a special purpose. After an awakening to political and social activism at college, Coretta went on to study at the New England Conservatory of Music, where she met Martin Luther King Jr. - the man who would one day become her husband. The union thrust Coretta into a maelstrom of history, throughout which her tireless fight for political and social justice established her as a champion of American civil rights.Now, fifty years after her husband's death, the story of Coretta's life is told in full for the first time: a love story, a family saga, a record of the legacy left by this extraordinary woman.'Presents the reader with a different way of looking at the world' New York Times

John Murray

Bad Girls

Caitlin Davies
Authors:
Caitlin Davies

A history of a century of women, punishment and crime in HM Prison Holloway.Society has never known what to do with its rebellious women. Those who defied expectations about feminine behaviour have long been considered dangerous and unnatural, and ever since the Victorian era they have been removed from public view, locked up and often forgotten about. Many of these women ended up at HM Prison Holloway, the self-proclaimed 'terror to evil-doers' which, until its closure in 2016, was western Europe's largest women's prison. First built in 1852 as a House of Correction, Holloway's women have come from all corners of the UK - whether a patriot from Scotland, a suffragette from Huddersfield, or a spy from the Isle of Wight - and from all walks of life - socialites and prostitutes, sporting stars and nightclub queens, refugees and freedom fighters. They were imprisoned for treason and murder, for begging, performing abortions and stealing clothing coupons, for masquerading as men, running brothels and attempting suicide. In Bad Girls, Caitlin Davies tells their stories and shows how women have been treated in our justice system over more than a century, what crimes - real or imagined - they committed, who found them guilty and why. It is a story of victimization and resistance; of oppression and bravery. From the women who escaped the hangman's noose - and those who didn't - to those who escaped Holloway altogether, Bad Girls is a fascinating look at how disobedient and defiant women changed not only the prison service, but the course of history.(P)2018 Hodder & Stoughton Limited

Sceptre

Deeds Not Words

Helen Pankhurst
Authors:
Helen Pankhurst

'An incredible book . . . Informative, enlightening, and with the potential to change women's lives.' Sandi Toksvig'A valuable guide and reference to anyone who wants to understand the Women's Movement in more depth. I am deeply grateful to Helen for writing it!' Annie Lennox OBEWhy is it taking so long? Despite huge progress since the suffragette campaigns and wave after wave of feminism, women are still fighting for equality. Why, at the present rate will we have to wait in Britain until 2069 for the gender pay gap to disappear? Why, in 2015, did 11% of women lose their jobs due to pregnancy discrimination? Why, globally, has 1 in 3 women experienced physical or sexual violence?In 2018, on the centenary of one of the greatest steps forward for women - the Fourth Reform Act, which saw propertied women over 30 gain the vote for the first time - suffragette descendant and campaigner Helen Pankhurst charts how the lives of women in the UK have changed over the last 100 years. She celebrates landmark successes, little-known victories, where progress has stalled or reversed, looking at politics, money, identity, violence, culture and social norms. The voices of both pioneers and ordinary women - in all their diversity - are woven into the analysis which ends with suggestions about how to better understand and strengthen feminist campaigning and with aims for the future.Combining historical insight with inspiring argument, Deeds not Words reveals how far women have come since the suffragettes, how far we still have to go, and how we might get there. It is essential reading for anyone who wants to explore one of the most central and pressing conversations of our time.

Hodder & Stoughton

Operation Thunderbolt

Saul David
Authors:
Saul David

'The definitive work on the subject....This is the achievement of a masterly, first-rate historian' New York Times Book Review'It's a brilliantly orchestrated book, wonderfully rich in detail, but at the same time roaring along at a heart-thumping pace...' Mail on Sunday'A brilliant, breathless account that reads like the plot of an action movie.' Sunday TelegraphThis is the true story of the greatest special forces' operation of the 20th Century and the first shot in the West's long war against international terrorism. It is a tale of human drama and unbearable tension in which courage, comradeship, fanaticism, incompetence and luck all play their part.On 3 July 1976 Israeli Special Forces carried out a daring raid to free more than a hundred Israeli, French and US hostages held by German and Palestinian terrorists at Entebbe Airport, Uganda. The legacy of this mission is still felt today in the way Western governments respond to terrorist blackmail. Codenamed Thunderbolt, the operation carried huge risks. The flight was a challenge: 2,000 miles with total radio silence over hostile territory to land in darkness at Entebbe Airport in Idi Amin's Uganda. On the ground, the Israeli commandos had just three minutes to carry out their mission. They had to evade a cordon of élite Ugandan paratroopers, storm the terminal and free more than a hundred hostages. So much could have gone wrong: the death of the hostages if the terrorists got wind of the assault; or the capture of Israel's finest soldiers if their Hercules planes could not take off. Both would have been a human and a PR catastrophe. Now, with the mission largely forgotten or even unknown to many, Saul David gives the first comprehensive account of Operation Thunderbolt using classified documents from archives in four countries and interviews with key participants, including Israeli soldiers and politicians, hostages, a member of the Kenyan government and a former terrorist. Both a thrilling page-turner and a major piece of historical detective work, Operation Thunderbolt shows how the outcome of Israel's most famous military operation depended on secret diplomacy, courage and luck-and was in the balance right up to the very last moment.(P)2015 Hachette Audio

Two Roads

The Gretna Girls

Tracey Lawson
Authors:
Tracey Lawson

This is the story of the remarkable women of HM Factory Gretna, and the vital role they played during the First World War.'The nitro-glycerine on the one side and the gun-cotton on the other are kneaded into a sort of a devil's porridge... Hats off to the women of Britain' Sir Arthur Conan DoyleUntil 1915 Gretna and Eastriggs were tiny rural hamlets. Then in 1915 the Ministry of Munitions arrived to build 'the greatest factory in the world'. By 1917 HM Factory Gretna was producing 1,100 tons of cordite every week - thanks to the Gretna Girls, the 12,000 female workers who played such a vital role in the war. From servant and factory girls (including the author's own grandmother) to suffragettes and female doctors, here for the first time is the extraordinary story of those women who lived and worked in the ground-breaking social experiment that was both dangerous and emancipating.'It is of such vital importance to the State that it is ringed with barbed-wire entanglements and patrolled by sentries... it is inhabited chiefly by pretty young girls clad in a Red-Riding-Hood fancy dress of khaki and scarlet.' Rebecca West after her visit, 1917

Two Roads

Queen Bees

Siân Evans
Authors:
Siân Evans
Chambers

50 Speeches That Made the Modern World

Hodder & Stoughton

Darkness

Karen Robards
Authors:
Karen Robards

New York Times bestselling author Karen Robards continues her penchant for 'fantastic storytelling'(RT Book Reviews) with this next heart-pumping romantic suspense novel, the tale of a brilliant ornithologist trapped on the remote Attu Island in Alaska, fighting for her life - and that of a handsome stranger - before they're swallowed up in darkness forever.BOOM. That's the sound that changes everything for Dr. Gina Sullivan, a renowned ornithologist on a group research grant trip on the remote island of Attu, Alaska. When an everyday outing turns sinister at the onset of one of Attu's infamous storms, Gina expects thunder and lightning - but what she doesn't see coming is the small jet plane that drops out of the sky and into the water mere feet from her boat. Even more unprecedented: there's a sole survivor from the crash, and he needs Gina's help. The stranger is James "Cal" Callahan, he of brooding eyes and muscled frame.Cal has made a career of trading on government secrets and emerging unscathed - until a routine pickup goes horribly wrong and lands him in ice-cold water. Literally. He knows the plane crash was no accident and that there could very well be an enemy force on the Alaskan island. Now if only the arrestingly beautiful bird-watcher with the clear-blue gaze would stop watching him, well, like a hawk. Cal convinces Gina to return to base camp and help him covertly get off the island. But when Gina makes it safely back to camp and finds her entire team murdered, all bets are off, and as darkness envelops the island, she must decide: trust a man she barely knows, or go it alone and risk running straight into the arms of a killer?

Hodder & Stoughton

Operation Thunderbolt

Saul David
Authors:
Saul David

*By the historical consultant to the major motion picture Entebbe*'The definitive work on the subject....This is the achievement of a masterly, first-rate historian' New York Times Book Review'It's a brilliantly orchestrated book, wonderfully rich in detail, but at the same time roaring along at a heart-thumping pace...' Mail on Sunday'A brilliant, breathless account that reads like the plot of an action movie.' Sunday TelegraphThis edition is updated with new material on recent discoveries. On 3 July 1976 Israeli Special Forces carried out a daring raid to free more than a hundred Israeli, French and US hostages held by German and Palestinian terrorists at Entebbe Airport, Uganda. The legacy of this mission is still felt today in the way Western governments respond to terrorist blackmail. Codenamed Thunderbolt, the operation carried huge risks. The flight was a challenge: 2,000 miles with total radio silence over hostile territory to land in darkness at Entebbe Airport in Idi Amin's Uganda. On the ground, the Israeli commandos had just three minutes to carry out their mission. They had to evade a cordon of élite Ugandan paratroopers, storm the terminal and free more than a hundred hostages. So much could have gone wrong: the death of the hostages if the terrorists got wind of the assault; or the capture of Israel's finest soldiers if their Hercules planes could not take off. Both would have been a human and a PR catastrophe. Now, with the mission largely forgotten or even unknown to many, Saul David gives the first comprehensive account of Operation Thunderbolt using classified documents from archives in four countries and interviews with key participants, including Israeli soldiers and politicians, hostages, a member of the Kenyan government and a former terrorist. Both a thrilling page-turner and a major piece of historical detective work, Operation Thunderbolt shows how the outcome of Israel's most famous military operation depended on secret diplomacy, courage and luck-and was in the balance right up to the very last moment.

Hodder & Stoughton

The Last Battle

Cornelius Ryan
Authors:
Cornelius Ryan
John Murray

The People

Selina Todd
Authors:
Selina Todd

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER'There was nothing extraordinary about my childhood or background. And yet I looked in vain for any aspect of my family's story when I went to university to read history, and continued to search fruitlessly for it throughout the next decade. Eventually I realised I would have to write this history myself.' What was it really like to live through the twentieth century? In 1910 three-quarters of the population were working class, but their story has been ignored until now. Based on the first-person accounts of servants, factory workers, miners and housewives, award-winning historian Selina Todd reveals an unexpected Britain where cinema audiences shook their fists at footage of Winston Churchill, communities supported strikers, and where pools winners (like Viv Nicholson) refused to become respectable. Charting the rise of the working class, through two world wars to their fall in Thatcher's Britain and today, Todd tells their story for the first time, in their own words. Uncovering a huge hidden swathe of Britain's past, The People is the vivid history of a revolutionary century and the people who really made Britain great.

John Murray

After Hitler

Michael Jones
Authors:
Michael Jones

On 30 April 1945, Adolf Hitler committed suicide. The following day, his propaganda minister Joseph Goebbels also killed himself and the crumbling Third Reich passed to Admiral Karl Dönitz. The Nazis' position seemed hopeless. Yet remarkably, the war in the rest of Europe went on for another ten days. After Hitler looks at these days as a narrative day-by-day countdown but also as a broader global history of a European war that had seen some of the most savage battles in history. Relations between the 'Big Three' - the United States, Great Britain and the Soviet Union - suddenly plunged to near breaking point. This book reveals that tumultuous story.After Hitler also looks at the wider canvas of the war and the terrible humanitarian catastrophe uncovered in Europe. It describes those who felt the joy of freedom, but also those who faced a highly uncertain future. As Red Army soldiers joined forces with their British and American allies, Stalin's East finally came face to face with Churchill's and Truman's West. After Hitler tells of their growing mistrust, but also of moments of remarkable goodwill and co-operation - the brief but poignant hope that these great nations could together fashion a new and safer future. This is a fascinating exploration of the brief but crucial period that shaped the emerging post-war world.

John Murray

Abducting a General

Patrick Leigh Fermor
Authors:
Patrick Leigh Fermor
Hodder & Stoughton

Vanishing Grace

Philip Yancey
Authors:
Philip Yancey

'Why does the church stir up such negative feelings?' This is a question that Philip Yancey has been asking all his life - for himself, as a pilgrim; for others, as a journalist. The question is more relevant now than ever: in the UK Christianity continues to decline, even as it is increasingly thought to be linked with intolerant, fundamentalist attitudes.Yet while identification with traditional forms of Christian religion is dropping, indicators show that interest in spirituality is rising. Why the disconnect? Why are so many asking, 'What's so good about the "good news?"'Yancey's lifelong writing career has always focused on the search for honest faith that makes a visible difference for a world in pain. In his landmark book What's So Amazing about Grace? he issued a benchmark call for Christians to be as grace-filled in their behaviour as they are in asserting their beliefs.People inside and outside the church are still thirsty for grace, Yancey points out. Perhaps what the church seemed to lack in its heyday is now, in its increasingly marginalised stance, exactly what it needs to recover in order to thrive. Grace can bridge the gap across the movement away from Christianity, inviting outsiders as well as insiders the chance to take a deep second look at why it matters and what could reignite its appeal to future generations.How can Christians offer grace in a way that is compelling to a jaded society? And how can they make a difference in a world of such wrenching need? Vanishing Grace: What Ever Happened to the Good News is a milestone book for all those who are striving to make sense of their faith and live it out amid the changing landscape of our day. Philip explores how Christians may have contributed to hostility toward them by presenting the gospel in ways that come across as strident and judgemental. Then he explores what kind of news is good to a culture that thinks it has rejected the Christian version. And finally, he offers illuminating stories of how faith can be expressed in ways that disarm even the most cynical critics - through pilgrims, activists, and artists rather than through preachers, evangelists, and apologists.

John Murray

When Paris Went Dark

Ronald Rosbottom
Authors:
Ronald Rosbottom

In May and June 1940 almost four million people fled Paris and its suburbs in anticipation of a German invasion. On June 14, the German Army tentatively entered the silent and eerily empty French capital. Without one shot being fired in its defence, the Occupation of Paris had begun. When Paris Went Dark tells the extraordinary story of Germany's capture and Occupation of Paris, Hitler's relationship with the City of Light, and its citizens' attempts at living in an environment that was almost untouched by war, but which had become uncanny overnight. Beginning with the Phoney War and Hitler's first visit to the city, acclaimed literary historian and critic Ronald Rosbottom takes us through the German Army's almost unopposed seizure of Paris, its bureaucratic re-organization of that city, with the aid of collaborationist Frenchmen, and the daily adjustments Parisians had to make to this new oppressive presence. Using memoirs, interviews and published eye-witness accounts, Rosbottom expertly weaves a narrative of daily life for both the Occupier and the Occupied. He shows its effects on the Parisian celebrity circles of Pablo Picasso, Simone de Beauvoir, Colette, Jean Cocteau, and Jean-Paul Sartre, and on the ordinary citizens of its twenty arrondissements. But Paris is the protagonist of this story, and Rosbottom provides us with a template for seeing the City of Light as more than a place of pleasure and beauty.

Hodder & Stoughton

Unsung Heroes

Erik Durschmied
Authors:
Erik Durschmied

There are instances of heroic deeds that had no immediate witness, such as the Scholls's attempt in 1943 to raise their nation's conscience, suppressed by Hitler's propaganda machine. The Canadian physicist Dr. Slotin acted in 1946; but since 'the bomb' was supposed to be fail-safe, his feat was not released to the public. A KGB commissar gagged Captain Marinesco in 1945, just as Moscow's rulers silently did away with Colonel Maleter in 1956 as a hindrance for their political ambition. In the case of Parteigenosse Duckwitz in 1943, nobody discovered that he was behind the betrayal of the Nazi plan, and he wouldn't publicise his disloyalty to his Führer. It took faith and courage for a Palermo priest to go up against the Sicilian Mafia in 1993. Holding out against impossible odds was a Yankee pilot in a clapped-out aircraft in 1941, and a British battalion against an entire army in Korea 1951. And there is the sergeant who in 1916 blundered into an 'impregnable fortress' and then took it single-handedly.These are a few brave man and women who dared to stand up and be counted. Some had to pay a bitter price for remaining loyal to their principles, but all of them changed the course of history.