Patrick Leigh Fermor - The Broken Road - Hodder & Stoughton

Time remaining

  • -- days
  • -- hours
  • -- minutes
  • -- seconds
Other Formats
  • Hardback £25.00
    More information
    • ISBN:9781848547520
    • Publication date:12 Sep 2013
  • Downloadable audio file £P.O.R.
    More information
    • ISBN:9781444784985
    • Publication date:03 Jul 2014

The Broken Road

From the Iron Gates to Mount Athos

By Patrick Leigh Fermor

  • Paperback
  • £10.99

The long-awaited final volume of the trilogy by Patrick Leigh Fermor - hailed as the greatest travel writer of his generation.

The long-awaited final volume of the trilogy by Patrick Leigh Fermor.

A Time of Gifts and Between the Woods and the Water were the first two volumes in a projected trilogy that would describe the walk that Patrick Leigh Fermor undertook at the age of eighteen from the Hook of Holland to Constantinople. 'When are you going to finish Vol. III?' was the cry from his fans; but although he wished he could, the words refused to come. The curious thing was that he had not only written an early draft of the last part of the walk, but that it predated the other two. It remains unfinished but The Broken Road - edited and introduced by Colin Thubron and Artemis Cooper - completes an extraordinary journey.

Biographical Notes

Following his walk across Europe, Patrick Leigh Fermor (1915-2011) lived and travelled in the Balkans and Greek Archipelago. He joined the Irish Guards and during the occupation of Crete led the party that captured the German commander. He was awarded the DSO and OBE.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781848547544
  • Publication date: 10 Apr 2014
  • Page count: 384
  • Imprint: John Murray
Nobody could do the job better than the book's editors. Colin Thubron is a travel writer of Leigh Fermor's calibre, Artemis Cooper is his masterly biographer . . . It contains wonderful passages of purest Leigh Fermor . . . Time and again he gives us vivid glimpses of encounters along the way - priests and peasants, the squalors of the back country, high life in Bucharest - and this virtuoso display is embedded as always in his astonishing range of learning . . . full of fun, kindness, easy learning, sophistication and innocence . . . a gently fitting conclusion to his tumultuous masterpiece — Jan Morris, Mail on Sunday
This is a major work. It confirms that Leigh Fermor was, along with Robert Byron, the greatest travel writer of his generation, and this final volume assures the place of the trilogy as one of the masterpieces of the genre, indeed one of the masterworks of post-war English non-fiction — William Dalrymple, Guardian
Colin Thubron and Artemis Cooper have put this book to bed with skill and sensitivity . . . Friends and fans, acolytes, devotees and disciples can all rest easy. It was worth the wait — Justin Marozzi, Spectator
The editors have done a fine job — Literary Review
It is magnificent. Cooper and Thubron have done an immense service in bringing the book to publication, for it unmistakably stands comparison with its remarkable siblings. The prose has the glorious turbulence and boil of the first two books, and the youthful magic of his 'dream-odyssey' is still potent — Robert MacFarlane, The Times
A fitting conclusion to his masterpiece . . . This book is momentous — Mail on Sunday
The pages are filled with brilliant evocations of his life on the road, none richer than the time he spent in a Romanian broth . . . It is a fitting epilogue to 20th-century travel-writing and essential reading for devotees of Sir Patrick's other works — The Economist
I set off along The Broken Road laden with expectations that I would have to make allowances. Yet almost from the off, I realised that I would have no use for these. Here was a wealth of descriptions that only Leigh Fermor could have conjured up . . . In a stroke of brilliance, Thubron and Cooper have included the separate diary that Leigh Fermor kept of the month he spent exploring Mount Athos in Greece immediately after leaving Istanbul. So, the Athos diary, aglow with rich experience, finally brings the journey to its rightful end in the spiritual heart of the country that was to prove, though the young author did not yet know it, Leigh Fermor's "real love and destination" — New Statesman
This is a picaresque essay, a virtuoso tapestry of anecdote in the author's best tradition — Country Life
The first two volumes were a joy to read, not least for Leigh Fermor's ability to recapture in later life the intense excitement of being a young man lighting out. The latest book offers similar joys . . . Also evident are another of the joys of the earlier books - the pyrotechnics of his writing. Exuberance is expressed in heightened suggestions . . . it captures the joy of the open road, the fresh view he gives of Europe as it began to show the stresses that led to world war, and the glimpses of a long-lost life and innocence — Observer
The Mount Athos diary - untampered with by his older self - reminds us what an extraordinary young man he was . . . This early style is more immediate, more youthful; a pleasure to read in a wholly different way from the later magnificence — Financial Times
A road trip that is as illuminating as it is incomplete made by a traveller, warrior and jewelled stylist — Independent
There is plenty to enjoy, so much so that the reader often forgets to wonder how much is true, and how much the revisionist work of an inventive and poetic mind . . . the pleasure lies in its combination of erudition, exuberant speculation, lively anecdote and meticulous, picture-painting language . . . Gorgeous imagery, granted, yet it is in Leigh Fermor's disarming cameos that The Broken Road excels — Sunday Times
His literary executors have topped, tailed and polished with such sympathy and skill that their interventions cannot be detected. This is pure Paddy: these are his feelings, perceptions and responses, his the observations, his the descriptions, consummate in a phrase, acute and intense when extended to paragraph or page; this is his style yet it is in many ways a youthful text, its core the adventure of a very young man, its embellishments the experience, curiosity and wisdom of his older self — Evening Standard
What a poignant and somehow fitting finale for a legendary procrastinator. It was certainly worth the wait — National
This final leg, through Romania and Bulgaria rounds off a classic trilogy — i
For readers of the other two books, to see the odyssey at last (almost) concluded, will naturally be irresistible. For everyone else there is the discovery of a unique writer — Sunday Express
The final volume confirms the trilogy as one of the 'masterpieces' of English travel writing — Week
A scintillating continuation of the prodigious walk that took the young Leigh Fermor right into the heart of magically different pre-war Europe and beyond . . . his journey is complete, his world task accomplished, with the whole undertaking as thick in marvels as Aladdin's cave — Irish Times
The perfect present for anyone with wanderlust — Good Housekeeping
The third unfinished volume of Leigh Fermor's enchanted journey through Mitteleuropa is here at last — TLS Books of the Year
Glorious . . . Artemis Cooper and Colin Thubron created THE BROKEN ROAD from a rejected essay on walking (15 times the size requested of Paddy), some failed drafts and a pair of flimsy travel journals. But the author is arguably more present in their loving editorial hands . . . than in any of his other books. There is also that infectious enthusiasm for the road and the lived experience, for spoken language, oral knowledge and for everything Byzantine and Greek — Daily Telegraph, Best Books of the Year
His epic journey's erudite conclusion will not disappoint his many fans — Saga
Offers a fascinating glimpse of a lost time and talent — Financial Times, Books of the Year
My favourite book this year was the final, unfinished and posthumous volume of Patrick Leigh Fermor's walking trilogy . . . it is every bit as masterly as Between the Woods and the Water — Observer, Books of the Year
Glorious . . . Artemis Cooper and Colin Thubron created The Broken Road . . . but the author is arguably more present in their loving editorial hands . . . than in any of his other books. There is also that infectious enthusiasm for the road and the lived experience, for spoken language, oral knowledge and for everything Byzantine and Greek — Daily Telegraph, Books of the Year
Offers a fascinating glimpse of a lost time and talent — Financial Times, Books of the Year
Its rich depictions and liquid language make this a masterpiece to savour — Sunday Express
In magnificent prose [Patrick Leigh Fermor] describes liaisons with countesses in crumbling castles, changing landscapes, now lost forever, and the delight of a young man with nothing but himself and his quest for adventure. Travel writing at its most sublime — Daily Express
His award-winning biographer Artemis Cooper and travel writer Colin Thubron have painstakingly and sensitively worked on Paddy's draft of the final leg of his epic journey and ghosted a wonderful account of his swashbuckling journey . . . It conjures up a life that's unimaginable in more cautious modern times and is beautifully written — Daily Mail
Like many really good things, it's hard to say why The Broken Road, the final volume of Patrick Leigh Fermor's account of his walk from Holland to Constantinople, is so satisfying. But it is — Mail on Sunday
John Murray Learning

The Oddysium

David Bramwell, Jo Keeling
Authors:
David Bramwell, Jo Keeling

THE ODDYSIUM explores extraordinary journeys, pilgrimages, expeditions and meanders of the mind that helped us to figure out our place in the world. We will learn about epic trips to the bottom of the ocean, to outer space and to the deepest cave on earth ("like climbing an inverted Mount Everest") as well as micro-journeys, such as Xavier de Maistre six-week odyssey around his bedroom and the tale of a Nazi who attempted to walk around the world without setting foot outside of his prison. Brought to you by the bestselling authors of THE ODDITORIUM and THE MYSTERIUM, this book is a call to arms to step off the beaten path and embark on your own eccentric, remarkable odyssey.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Rhine

Ben Coates
Authors:
Ben Coates

The Rhine is one of the world's greatest rivers. Once forming the outer frontier of the Roman Empire, it flows 800 miles from the wealthy mountain fortresses of Switzerland and Liechtenstein, through the industrial and political powerhouses of Germany and France, to the social democratic playground of the Netherlands. For five years, Ben Coates lived alongside a major channel of the river in Rotterdam, crossing it daily, swimming and sailing in its tributaries. In The Rhine, he sets out by bicycle to the river's source in the icy Alps, then cycles along its course through six countries to where it enters the North Sea. He explores the impact that the Rhine has had on European culture and history and finds out how influences have flowed along and across the river, shaping the people who live alongside it. Blending travelogue and offbeat history, The Rhine tells the fascinating story of how a great river helped shape a continent.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Swiss Watching

Diccon Bewes
Authors:
Diccon Bewes

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Why Travel Matters

Craig Storti
Authors:
Craig Storti
Hodder & Stoughton

Walking to Jerusalem

Justin Butcher
Authors:
Justin Butcher
Coronet

Mind of a Survivor

Megan Hine
Authors:
Megan Hine
Hodder & Stoughton

Eastern Horizons

Levison Wood
Authors:
Levison Wood

BY THE AUTHOR OF WALKING THE HIMALAYAS, WINNER OF THE 2016 EDWARD STANFORD ADVENTURE TRAVEL BOOK OF THE YEAR AWARDLevison Wood was only 22 when he decided to hitch-hike from England to India through Russia, Iran, Afghanistan and Pakistan, but he wasn't the conventional follower of the hippy trail. A fascination with the deeds of the early explorers, a history degree in the bag, an army career already planned and a shoestring budget of £750 - including for the flight home - he was determined to find out more about the countries of the Caucasus and beyond - and meet the people who lived and worked there.EASTERN HORIZONS is a true traveller's tale in the tradition of the best of the genre, populated by a cast of eccentric characters; from mujahideen fighters to the Russian mafia. Along the way he meets some people who showed great hospitality, while others would rather have murdered him...This book confirms that Levison Wood, Winner of the 2016 Edward Stanford Adventure Travel Book Of The Year Award, has indeed 'breathed new life into adventure travel ' (Michael Palin)

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Where the Wild Winds Are

Nick Hunt
Authors:
Nick Hunt

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

The Timbuktu School for Nomads

Nicholas Jubber
Authors:
Nicholas Jubber

The Sahara: a dream-like, far away landscape of Lawrence of Arabia and Wilfred Thesiger, The English Patient and Star Wars, and home to nomadic communities whose ways of life stretch back millennia. Today it's a teeth-janglingly dangerous destination, where the threat of jihadists lurks just over the horizon. Following in the footsteps of 16th century traveller Leo Africanus, Nicholas Jubber went on a turbulent adventure to the forgotten places of North Africa and the legendary Timbuktu.Once the seat of African civilization and home to the richest man who ever lived, this mythic city is now scarred by terrorist occupation and is so remote its own inhabitants hail you with the greeting, 'Welcome to the middle of nowhere'. From the cattle markets of the Atlas, across the Western Sahara and up the Niger river, Nicholas joins the camps of the Tuareg, Fulani, Berbers, and other communities, to learn about their craft, their values and their place in the world.The Timbuktu School for Nomads is a unique look at a resilient city and how the nomads pit ancient ways of life against the challenges of the 21st century.

John Murray

Dashing for the Post

Patrick Leigh Fermor
Authors:
Patrick Leigh Fermor
Hodder & Stoughton

Hidden Nature

Alys Fowler
Authors:
Alys Fowler
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Why the Dutch are Different

Ben Coates
Authors:
Ben Coates
Hodder & Stoughton

Walking the Americas

Levison Wood
Authors:
Levison Wood
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Revolutionary Ride

Lois Pryce
Authors:
Lois Pryce
Hodder Paperbacks

Walking the Himalayas

Levison Wood
Authors:
Levison Wood
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Dare to Do

Sarah Outen
Authors:
Sarah Outen

On 1 April 2011, rower and adventurer Sarah Outen set off in her kayak from Tower Bridge for France. Her aim was simple: to circle the globe entirely under her own steam - cycling, kayaking and rowing across Europe, Asia, the Pacific, the Americas, the Atlantic and eventually home. A year later, Sarah was plucked from the Pacific ocean amid tropical storm Mawar, her boat broken, her spirit even more so. But that wasn't the end. Despite ill health and depression, giving up was not an option. So Sarah set off once more to finish what she had started, becoming the first woman to row solo from Japan to Alaska, as well as the first woman to row the Pacific from West to East. She kayaked the treacherous Aleutian chain and cycled the Americas, before setting sail on the Atlantic, despite the risk of another row-ending storm...Dare to Do is more than an adventure story. It is a story of the kindness of strangers and the spirit of travel; a story of the raw power of nature, of finding love in unexpected places, and of discovering your inner strength. It is about trying and failing, and trying again, and about how, even when all seems lost, you can find yourself.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Slow Train to Switzerland

Diccon Bewes
Authors:
Diccon Bewes

In June 1863 an English lady set off by train on the trip of a lifetime: Thomas Cook's first Conducted Tour of Switzerland. A century and a half later, travel writer Diccon Bewes, author of the bestselling Swiss Watching, decided to go where she went and see what she saw. Guided by her diary, he followed the same route to discover how much had changed and how much hadn't. She went in search of adventure, he went in search of her, and found far more than he expected. Slow Train to Switzerland is the captivating account of two trips through the Alps: hers glimpsing the future of travel, his revisiting its past. Together they make a journey to remember.This is a tale of trains and tourists, of the British and the Swiss, of a Victorian traveller and a modern-day Englishman abroad. It is the story of a tour that changed both Switzerland and the world of travel forever.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

It's All Greek to Me!

John Mole
Authors:
John Mole
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Head Over Heel

Chris Harrison
Authors:
Chris Harrison

'A perfect read for a Mediterannean beach' Daily TelegraphWhen Chris travelled from Sydney to Dublin, he never dreamed his life was about to change forever. There he meets Daniela - one L, smile as you say it to pronounce it correctly - and it's amore at first sight. Before he can say si, he's uprooted to follow her to her sun-kissed hometown of Andrano, Puglia, tucked in the heel of southern Italy.The whitewashed houses, olive groves and cobblestone lanes are beautiful, but soon Chris is getting to grips with everyday Italian life. There's infuriating bureaucracy, an anarchic road system and - biggest challenge of all - Daniela's mamma, who's determined to convert him to the Catholic faith and build an extension on her house where the couple might live la dolce vita.WINNER OF THE GROLLO RUZZENE FOUNDATION PRIZE

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Gatecrashing Paradise

Tom Chesshyre
Authors:
Tom Chesshyre

Away from the five-star hotels and beyond luxury hideaways, Tom Chesshyre travels to see the real, unexplored Maldives, skirting around the archipelago's periphery, staying at simple guesthouses, and using cargo ships and ferries. He discovers that beyond the glossy brochures lies an almost undiscovered country that is brimming with life, yet also a paradise teetering on the brink of trouble.In the Maldives outsiders used to be banned from islands not officially endorsed as tourist resorts, but now a thousand sandy shores can be visited in this remote nation deep in the Indian Ocean the flattest on Earth.This is island-hopping for the twenty-first century, sailing around 600 miles of the most beautiful islands and atolls on Earth, often to communities that have not seen an outsider for decades, ...and gatecrashing the odd posh hotel.