Dan Snow - On This Day in History - Hodder & Stoughton

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On This Day in History

By Dan Snow

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

3000 years of the most important stories from the past in 365 days -- from the Ides of March to D-Day, from Britain's favourite historian

'History is an infinite reservoir of stories, examples, warnings, explanations, jokes, rebukes and inspiration . . . You can't understand the present if you can't understand the past.'

In On This Day in History Dan Snow, Britain's favourite historian, tells the story of an important event that happened on each day of the year. From the signing of the Armistice treaty at 11 a.m. on the 11th day of the 11th month in 1918, to Rosa Parks refusing to give up her bus seat on 1 December 1955, our past is full of all kinds of fascinating turning points.

From the most important battle fought on British soil that you've never heard of on 20 May 685 to the first meeting of John Lennon and Paul McCartney on 6 July 1957, and from the first instance of choreomania - an affliction that caused its victims to dance uncontrollably - on 24 July 1374, to the day Napolean Bonaparte being attacked by hundreds of wild rabbits on 12 July 1807, On This Day in History's 365 carefully picked entries add up into a short, vivid, personal history of the world. There is no such thing as a day on which nothing happened.

Biographical Notes

Dan Snow is a historian, BAFTA-winning broadcaster and television presenter. His hugely popular History Hit podcast is downloaded a million times a month, has over 250,000 keen followers on Twitter and he has recently launched a history TV channel. He has presented shows such asArmada, Grand Canyon and Vikings. He has a regular slot on The One Show on BBC1. He has written several books including Battlefield Britain and The Battle of Waterloo.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473691285
  • Publication date: 15 Nov 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: John Murray
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