Leo McKinstry - Hurricane - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Paperback £10.99
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    • ISBN:9781848543416
    • Publication date:06 Jan 2011
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    • ISBN:9781848543942
    • Publication date:24 Jun 2010

Hurricane

Victor of the Battle of Britain

By Leo McKinstry
Read by Peter Noble

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The biography of the aeroplane that won the Battle of Britain, for the seventieth anniversary

The biography of the aeroplane that won the Battle of Britain.

In the summer of 1940 the fate of Europe hung in the balance. Victory in the forthcoming air battle would mean national survival; defeat would establish German tyranny.

The Luftwaffe greatly outnumbered the RAF, but during the Battle of Britain it was the RAF that emerged triumphant, thanks to two key fighter planes, the Spitfire and the Hurricane. The Hurricane made up over half of Fighter Command's front-line strength, and its revolutionary design transformed the RAF's capabilities.

Leo McKinstry tells the story of the remarkable plane from its designers to the first-hand testimonies of those brave pilots who flew it; he takes in the full military and political background but always keeps the human stories to the fore - to restore the Hawker Hurricane to its rightful place in history.

(P)2018 Hodder & Stoughton Ltd

Biographical Notes

Leo McKinstry writes regularly for the Daily Mail, Sunday Telegraph and Spectator . He has also written five books including a study of the Labour Party and a best-selling biography of the footballing Charlton brothers. Born in Belfast he was educated in Ireland and at Cambridge University.

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  • ISBN: 9781473689732
  • Publication date: 24 May 2018
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  • Imprint: John Murray
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