Andrew Ziminski - The Stonemason - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Hardback £20.00
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    • ISBN:9781473663930
    • Publication date:16 May 2019
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    • ISBN:9781473699762
    • Publication date:16 May 2019

The Stonemason

An Insider's History of Britain's Buildings

By Andrew Ziminski

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  • £P.O.R.

Part-hands-on archaeological history of Britain, part-deeply personal insight into this ancient craft by a stonemason who has worked on Britain's greatest monuments, from Stonehenge to St Paul's.

Stonemason Andrew Ziminski has three decades of experience with the tangible history of this country - from raising stones at Stonehenge, the restoration of roman ruins in the City of Bath, to work to save some of our most important medieval churches and cathedrals.

But there's nothing dusty about this stonemason.

Offering a unique account of life as a craftsman as well as a history of Britain from the New Stone Age to the Industrial Revolution, The Stonemason is both a celebration of man's close relationship with its greatest of natural materials, and a reminder of the value of 'made by hand'.

Biographical Notes

Andrew Ziminski is a stonemason living and working in what was ancient Wessex. He has three decades of hands-on experience with the tangible history of this country, including raising stones at Stonehenge, the restoration of roman ruins in the City of Bath and work to save some of our most important medieval churches and cathedrals. He is also a member of The William Morris Craft Fellowship. This is his first book.

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  • ISBN: 9781473663954
  • Publication date: 16 May 2019
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  • Imprint: John Murray
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