Riad Sattouf - The Arab of the Future 2 - Hodder & Stoughton

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    • ISBN:9781473638228
    • Publication date:22 Sep 2016
Books in this series

The Arab of the Future 2

Volume 2: A Childhood in the Middle East, 1984-1985 - A Graphic Memoir

By Riad Sattouf

  • Paperback
  • £18.99

VOLUME 2 IN THE BESTSELLING SERIES.
The highly anticipated continuation of Riad Sattouf's internationally acclaimed graphic memoir.

VOLUME 2 IN THE UNFORGETTABLE STORY OF AN EXTRAORDINARY CHILDHOOD

A GUARDIAN BOOK OF THE YEAR | AN OBSERVER GRAPHIC BOOK OF THE YEAR
A NEW YORK TIMES CRITICS' TOP BOOKS OF 2016 'EXUBERANTLY HERETICAL'

'I tore through it... The most enjoyable graphic novel I've read in a while' Zadie Smith
'I joyously recommend this book to you' Mark Haddon
'Riad Sattouf is one of the great creators of our time' Alain De Botton
'Beautifully-written and drawn, witty, sad, fascinating... Brilliant' Simon Sebag Montefiore

The first volume of Riad Sattouf's The Arab of the Future introduced young Riad as his family shuttled back and forth between France and the Middle East.
Here is the continuation of his heart-rending, darkly comic story. Now settled in his father's village of Ter Maaleh near Homs, Riad finally begins school, where he dedicates himself to becoming a true Syrian in the country of the dictator Hafez Al-Assad.
Told simply yet with devastating effect, Riad's story takes in the sweep of Middle Eastern life of the 1980s, but it is steered by acutely observed small moments: the daily sadism of his schoolteachers, the cruelty and vulnerability of his fellow students, and the obsequiousness of his father in the company of those close to the regime. And as the family strains to fit in, one chilling, barbaric act drives the Sattoufs to take the most dramatic of steps.
Immediate and gripping, The Arab of the Future 2 once again reveals the inner workings of a tormented country and a tormented family, delivered through Riad Sattouf 's dazzlingly original graphic style.

Translated by Sam Taylor.

***THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE - THE INTERNATIONAL SENSATION***

#1 BESTSELLER IN FRANCE | GUARDIAN 'BEST GRAPHIC BOOKS OF 2015' PICK | NYTIMES EDITOR'S CHOICE | SELECTED AS ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF THE YEAR BY LATIMES, SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE, AMAZON.COM, PUBLISHERS WEEKLY, NPR | WINNER OF THE FAUVE D'OR PRIZE FOR BEST ALBUM OF THE YEAR AT THE ANGOULÊME INTERNATIONAL COMICS FESTIVAL | WINNER OF THE LATIMES BOOK PRIZE FOR GRAPHIC NOVELS | NOMINATED FOR 'BEST REALITY-BASED WORK' AT THE EISNER AWARDS

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473638235
  • Publication date: 22 Sep 2016
  • Page count: 160
  • Imprint: Two Roads
I tore through two volumes of The Arab of the Future, by Riad Sattouf - it's the most enjoyable graphic novel I've read in a while — Zadie Smith
This is a masterpiece that deserves the widest readership. The Arab Of The Future reminds us that, in talented hands, graphic novels are capable of carrying the weightiest themes, making us think, and touching our hearts while also keeping us hugely entertained. Riad Sattouf is one of the great creators of our time' — Alain De Botton
The Arab of the Future is wonderfully observed, funny, grim, sharp and sad. Riad Sattouf, with his ear for anecdote, his nimble drawing and his understanding of human frailty, has created a masterpiece. — Posy Simmonds
I joyously recommend this book to you. You will be moved, entertained and edified. Often simultaneously — Mark Haddon
The second volume of Riad Sattouf's acclaimed graphic memoir takes a darker turn as he endures school and his father is complicit in a terrible crime... I loved it — Rachel Cooke, Observer Graphic Book of the Month
"Sattouf experienced both Gaddafi's Libya and Hafez al-Assad's Syria while still a small boy. Kids don't spend a lot of time reflecting on totalitarianism, but they do form strong impressions. His simple depictions of living in an almost-abandoned building for expatriates in Libya, or of watching Assad praying on TV are the kind of banal micro-details that would lose their significance in written prose. Captured in the panels of a cartoon strip, however, they attain a luminous resonance that lingers long after you've finished the book. — Guardian
Like Marjane Satrapi's Persepolis, the story captures wonderfully the disorientating effect of growing up between Arab and European cultures. Sattouf has a fine eye for the details and characters of his childhood in Syria, where the possibility of sudden violence was ever present — New Statesman
Sattouf's memoir of a childhood in the Middle East continues and it's great to have him back. I really think he could be the Marcel Proust of the illustrated form. Charming and subtle, The Arab of the Future opens a much-needed window onto the Syrian past. — Gary Perry, Foyles Staff Pick
The books in the graphic memoir series The Arab of the Future make me feel like a child about to read the new Harry Potter or see the new Star Wars film. I look forward to them with so much anticipation and read each new volume immediately... These books are such a joy to read for their lively and expressive drawings and engaging stories that present the author's wide-eyed innocent look at his cross-national childhood... This volume continues to give a fascinating view of what it was like growing up in a country under what's effectively a military dictatorship... Sattouf sensitively shows how the social imbalances and rigidly enforced moralities are a result of people living under a government regime which does not tolerate any different or dissident opinions that conflict with the prevailing order. I'm absolutely gripped now and can't wait to read the third volume of this striking and original memoir. — Lonesome Reader
The acclaim of recent years for the work of Alan Moore, Posy Simmonds, Joe Sacco, Neil Gaiman and others means the genre of the graphic novel no longer suffers the condescension of critics. It has left the countercultural ghetto and gone global. This second volume of Riad Sattouf's childhood memoir offers a fine example of its virtues... A more enjoyable introduction to understanding the everyday hopes and despairs of the Middle East's middle class is hard to imagine — Prospect
Since these larger contours repeat from the first volume, it's now easier to appreciate the cartoonist's ability to pick out peculiarities, marking out a character's whole persona and philosophy with the surgical shorthand of a practised caricaturist. His bit players are brilliant: merchants who haggle with lunatic abandon; the indignant girl, her face screwed up in demonic distortions, hurling mean curses; the towering teacher, built like a bull, sweet one moment and sadistic the next; a cross-eyed young aunt, generous and bubbling, brutally dealt with by her father for supposedly dishonouring the family. By volume's end, there's something about the adult world that even naive young Riad can tell is not only puzzling, but deeply troubling, as well — Globe and Mail
In the second volume of an acclaimed five-part graphic memoir, originally published in France, cartoonist Sattouf captures the discomfiting and occasionally humorous details of his first year in school in a Syria that is casually anti-Semitic and not particularly kind to anyone... Because everything filters through a six-year-old boy's point of view, the more disturbing moments that Sattouf recounts aren't bleak so much as confusing, surreal, and sad... Sattouf is a master of visual storytelling, capable of compressing a great deal of human emotion and contradictions within a few panels. He creates a searing depiction of growing up poor in a country ruled by corruption and religious zealotry. — Publishers Weekly - Starred review

***PRAISE FOR THE ARAB OF THE FUTURE VOLUME 1***
Not since Persepolis, Marjane Satrapi's graphic memoir of revolutionary Iran, has a comic book seemed so important, or been so acclaimed... There is a feeling that the book throws some light both on the roots of the Arab spring, and what has happened since. In a country - and beyond it, a world - in which bewilderment and anxiety at recent events polarises communities as often as it unites them, it has an authenticity with which no expert or talking head could ever hope to compete.

— Observer
Excellent... The graphic novel has proved itself again and again. It already has its canon: Art Spiegelman on the Holocaust, Marjane Satrapi on girlhood in Islamist Iran, and, perhaps most accomplished of all, Joe Sacco'sFootnotes in Gaza, a work of detailed and self-reflexive history. Edging towards this company comes Riad Sattouf's childhood memoir of tyranny... It's this sort of detail, drawn with the cartoon clarity of childhood perception, that makes the book such a success... The Arab of the Future is an authentic, emotionally honest memoir, and much more useful background reading for present events than a romanticised account of cosmopolitan, bourgeois Damascus would be. — Guardian
The whims of Sattouf's increasingly authoritarian father drive volumes one and two, which mix darkness, dry humour and sharp observation. — Guardian
Marvellous... Sattouf records it all in an endearing cartoony style, his clean lines enhanced by discreet colour shading to indicate which country they're living in at the time. His comic timing is immaculate, but there's always an edge to his humour. Packing a host of unforgettable scenes, The Arab of the Future begs to be read in one long sitting. — Herald (Paperback of the Week)
Riad Sattouf's shockingly blunt The Arab of the Future, which tells the story of the French cartoonist's itinerant childhood in the Middle East, is a must for anyone who wants to understand more about the failure of the pan-Arab dream, with all the consequences this has had for the situation in which we now find ourselves. It's also a page-turner, dissecting as it does the psychology of a man (Riad's Syrian father) whose increasingly deluded idealism results in a form of tyranny when it comes to his own family. — Guardian (Best Graphic Books of 2015)
The Arab of the Future confirms Riad Sattouf's place among the greatest cartoonists of his generation. — Le Monde (France)
As the very young Riad Sattouf navigates life in Libya, France, and Syria, he gets a serious education in the mysterious vectors of power that shape not just the political world, but the intimate sphere of his own family. With charming yet powerful drawings and vivid sensory details, Sattouf delivers a child's-eye view of the baffling adult world in all its complexity, corruption, and delusion. This is a beautiful, funny, and important graphic memoir. — Alison Bechdel, author of FUN HOME
Exquisitely illustrated, and filled with experiences of misfortune bordering on the farcical, Mr. Sattouf's book is a disquieting yet essential read. — New York Times
Fascinating... A really moving and at times quite melancholy story of an odd childhood. I'm really looking forward to reading Volume 2 in September — Annie James, A Case for Books
The Arab of the Future has become that rare thing in France's polarized intellectual climate: an object of consensual rapture, hailed as a masterpiece in the leading journals of both the left and the right. . . . it has, in effect, made Sattouf the Arab of the present in France. — New Yorker
Sattouf's work is laced with astute observations of human beings. His memoirs often dwell on their failings: hypocrisy, cowardice, bullying. Yet there's humour too - mainly because his humans are so helplessly absurd. — Guardian
Engrossing . . . Sattouf writes in a fluid prose, beautifully translated by Sam Taylor. — New York Times Book Review (Editor's Choice)
Captivating, compelling, informative and an amazing read... Using his voice as a child, Saffouf deals with the topics such as Arabs v Jews, America and the Western Influences, the madness of Gaddafi, racism in France and the general treatment of women. With these topics one might think it's a heavy read but by telling his life in graphic format is ingenious and powerful... An important book. I will be recommending this to all our customers, a must read. — Sheilla O'Reilly, Dulwich Books
Drawn with remarkable flair and a winning visual style, Sattouf's memoir is an incredible achievement. The Arab of the Future took me to places that, until now, I only really knew through headlines. Vital, funny and poignant, it's Sattouf's focus on the common aspects of childhood that gives this book so much punch. — Gary Perry, Foyles Staff Pick
Epic... Told with childlike wonder and the merest hint of mature understanding, it's a wide-eyed and unforgettable tour of the early days of Muammar Gaddafi's Libya and Hafez al-Assad's Syria (via rural Brittany), as Sattouf's professor father pursues an unbridled ambition to help build a proud Arab nation through the power of education. — Bookanista

Sattouf's book takes us from place to place and culture to culture, and in the emphasis of differences there is also the unveiling of similarities... Sattouf retells, with words and images, the heartbreaking realisation of the non-place in which many immigrants are forced to exist... Sattouf's book is challenging amongst other reasons because it deals with the most demonised, othered identity in Europe. Because the narrative takes the characters from country to country, language to language and culture to culture, the narrative perspective is necessarily comparative, and because things are never black and white, either/or, often the conclusions are contradictory... There is a loneliness in all of Sattouf's characters, who, often, do not really talk to each other, but to themselves, or keep a repressed/repressive silence. In the constant coming and going of the trial and error from country to country, the immigrant's story is, in spite of the presence of family, one of solitude, but moved forward by hope...
In this sense The Arab of the Future is a profoundly political and timely book... The present historical moment in Europe calls more than ever for exercises of solidarity and empathy: in retelling his past Sattouf is not merely retreating into himself, but telling us very important things about the historical past, present and possible futures of us all.

— Comics Grid
Riven with flashes of dark humour... The penmanship is simple and witty, oddly it reminded me of Matt in the Telegraph. Despite writing for Charlie Hebdo, Sattouf had never been an overtly political cartoonist and yet inThe Arab of The Future he has said more about the problems of the Arab world than a hundred newspaper articles. The story ends in 1984 with the family about to return to Syria. The sequel is already out in France with an English edition to come in September. I can't wait. — CapX
Engaging and lovely to look at . . . Sattouf has an eye for grimly funny details . . . and milks the disjunction between how he experienced his political environment at the time and how he understands it now for all it's worth. — Los Angeles Times (Best Books of the Year 2015)
Sattouf's timely graphic memoir - a bestseller in France, where he lives - recounts his upbringing in Syria and Libya. Despite the starkness of much of his story, Sattouf maintains a playful touch in all his panels. — San Francisco Chronicle (Best of 2015)
With a judicious eye for an anecdote, and even more judicious doses of commentary, Sattouf - a former contributor to the French humor magazine Charlie Hebdo - delivers a vicious denunciation of pan-Arabism and Islamic politics. It might seem impossible to depict the recent history of the Middle East using Sattouf's zany drawing style... But Sattouf uses this style to establish a subtle and contradictory relationship with his reader. He simultaneously disclaims the reader's attention - No, nothing important going on here - and challenges the discerning few to look closer. — NPR
The hundred-and-fifty-odd pages of Riad Sattouf's internationally bestselling graphic memoir . . . move with anirrepressible comic velocity. The book is told Candide-style . . . an indictment of the adult world and its insidious methods of diminishment we all have either faced or been fortunate enough to escape. — New Republic
The book, whose title pokes fun at Abdel-Razak's pan-Arabist obsessions, shows the hypocrisy behind one man's understanding of that failed political ideology, makes tangible the absurdity of living under propaganda-mad dictators, and it humanizes, for better or worse, certain segments of very poor Muslim populations in two specific parts of the Middle East. — Vice
The Arab of the Future maintains a balance of comedy and commentary and ...is carried by excellent drawings. Riad Sattouf's work takes its place alongside other classic animated retrospective memoirs from the region, Persepolis . . . and Waltz with Bashir. — New York Journal of Books
The book's highest achievement is the ability to portray the tacit power structures that govern family and nation through the eyes of a child, with all of a child's parental worship and bafflement... The Arab of the Future begs for a more complex and compassionate understanding of an area of the world that's all too often the target of misunderstanding and fear. — Pittsburgh Post-Gazette
The Arab of the Future is already being compared to biographical classics like Maus and Persepolis, and the modern relevance of the countries in which it is set is sure to make this a widely talked about book this year. — Mentalfloss.com
In his comics, Sattouf deftly weaves the political background with the everyday. He tells a personal story but also observes the society and country around him, and his great sense of humor makes reading the book thoroughly enjoyable. It'll have you laughing to the point of tears. — Haaretz (Israel)
Rarely I've encountered a more convincing combination of wit and depth. — Frankfurter Allgemeine (Germany)
Brilliant, sharp and surprising. — Repubblica (Italy)
Touching, chilling and very instructive. — El Mundo (Spain)
Sattouf presents timely, candid insights into life behind the curtain in news-making nations - namely, in this case, Libya and Syria... he nails the inexplicable dizziness of being a child. — Globe and Mail
Sattouf's account of his childhood is a deeply personal recollection of a peripatetic youth that can resonate with audiences across the world. It also paints an incisive picture of the Arab world in the late 1970s and early 1980s that sets the stage for the revolutionary changes that would grip and roil the region decades later. — Foreign Policy
Wide-eyed, yet perceptive, the book documents the wanderings of [Sattouf's] mismatched parents? His bookish French mother and pan-Arabist father, Abdel-Razak Sattouf . . . often disquieting, but always honest. — France 24
Very funny and very sad . . . the social commentary here is more wistful and melancholy than sharp-edged . . . subtly written and deftly illustrated, with psychological incisiveness and humor. — Kirkus Reviews (starred review)
Despite his father's determination to integrate his son into Arab society, little Sattouf - with his long blond hair - never fully fits in, and this report reads like the curious pondering of an alien from another world. Caught between his parents, Sattouf makes the best of his situation by becoming a master observer and interpreter, his clean, cartoonish art making a social and personal document of wit and understanding. — Publishers Weekly (starred review)
Coronet

Barrie

Sean Laidlaw
Authors:
Sean Laidlaw

The heart-warming story of Barrie, the stray puppy rescued from the rubble in Syria by former soldier Sean Laidlaw.Barrie was rescued from the rubble by Bomb disposal expert and former soldier Sean Laidlaw. He gradually gained her trust and they soon became inseparable. When Sean's contract to Syria was not renewed and he could not return to her, he raised the funds to bring her home with him. The two created an incredible bond in their three months together, and they were reunited in emotional scenes in early November. Sean credits Barrie with helping him with PTSD, and Barrie has been rescued from a life on the streets in war-torn Syria.(P)2019 Hodder & Stoughton Limited

Sceptre

My Past Is a Foreign Country

Zeba Talkhani
Authors:
Zeba Talkhani

27-year-old Zeba Talkhani charts her experiences growing up in Saudi Arabia amid patriarchal customs reminiscent of The Handmaid's Tale, and her journey to find freedom abroad in India, Germany and the UK as a young woman.Talkhani offers a fresh perspective on living as an outsider and examines her relationship with her mother and the challenges she faced when she experienced hair loss at a young age. Rejecting the traditional path her culture had chosen for her, Talkhani became financially independent and married on her own terms in the UK. Drawing on her personal experiences Talkhani shows how she fought for the right to her individuality as a feminist Muslim and refused to let negative experiences define her.

Hodder & Stoughton

Private Parts

Eleanor Thom
Authors:
Eleanor Thom

What the internet can tell you about endometriosis: Endometriosis is a chronic and incurable condition that affects 1 in 10 women with approximately 1.6 million sufferers in the UK alone, but only 20% of the general public have heard of it. It takes an average of seven and a half years to get a diagnosis in the UK and affects sufferers' capacity to work, their fertility and their ability to enjoy sex. What Eleanor Thom can tell you about endometriosis: You are so much more than the sum of your private parts. Part memoir, part guide book and part survival guide, Private Parts retraces Eleanor's own journey with endometriosis, offering readers practical, down-to-earth and friendly advice covering everything from what actually happens in an internal exam, to finding the right specialist for you, the perfect post-op wardrobe and to why you should look to Frida Kahlo for inspiration in your darkest moments. Written for those looking to live well with their endometriosis and for those who are looking for help to understand the disease and how it affects those with it, Private Parts is a call to action for people to speak up about an illness which is still so misunderstood.Will feature exclusive interviews with Hilary Mantel and Lena Dunham.

John Murray

Homing

Jon Day
Authors:
Jon Day

As a boy, Jon Day was fascinated by pigeons, which he used to rescue from the streets of London. Twenty years later he moved away from the city centre to the suburbs to start a family. But in moving house, he began to lose a sense of what it means to feel at home.Returning to his childhood obsession with the birds, he built a coop in his garden and joined a local pigeon racing club. Over the next few years, as he made a home with his young family in Leyton, he learned to train and race his pigeons, hoping that they might teach him to feel homed.Having lived closely with humans for tens of thousands of years, pigeons have become powerful symbols of peace and domesticity. But they are also much-maligned, and nowadays most people think of these birds, if they do so at all, as vermin.A book about the overlooked beauty of this species, and about what it means to dwell, Homing delves into the curious world of pigeon fancying, explores the scientific mysteries of animal homing, and traces the cultural, political and philosophical meanings of home. It is a book about the making of home and making for home: a book about why we return.

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The Adventures of Alexander von Humboldt

Andrea Wulf, Lilian Melcher
Authors:
Andrea Wulf, Lilian Melcher
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It's Trevor Noah: Born a Crime

Trevor Noah
Authors:
Trevor Noah

The host of The Daily Show, Trevor Noah, tells the story of growing up mixed race in South Africa under and after apartheid in this young readers' adaptation of his bestselling adult memoir Born a Crime: Stories from a South African Childhood.BORN A CRIME IS SOON TO BE A MAJOR MOTION PICTURE STARRING OSCAR-WINNER LUPITA NYONG'O!Trevor Noah, host ofThe Daily Show, shares his remarkable story of growing up in South Africa, with a black South African mother and a white European father at a time when it was against the law for a mixed-race child like him to exist. But he did exist -- and from the beginning, the often-misbehaved Trevor used his keen smarts and humour to navigate a harsh life under a racist government. This compelling memoir blends drama, comedy and tragedy to depict the day-to-day trials that turned a boy into a young man. In a country where racism barred blacks from social, educational, and economic opportunity, Trevor surmounted staggering obstacles and created a promising future for himself, thanks to his mom's unwavering love and indomitable will.It's Trevor Noah: Born a Crime not only provides a fascinating and honest perspective on South Africa's racial history, but it will also astound and inspire young readers looking to improve their own lives.

Hodder & Stoughton

Everybody Died, So I Got a Dog

Emily Dean
Authors:
Emily Dean

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Sceptre

Threads of Life

Clare Hunter
Authors:
Clare Hunter

The Hare with Amber Eyes meets The History of the World in 100 Objects: an eloquent history of the language of sewing'Threads of Life is a beautifully considered book...Clare Hunter mixes the personal with the political with moving results.' TRACY CHEVALIER**RADIO 4 BOOK OF THE WEEK**For the mothers of the disappeared in 1970s Argentina, protest was difficult. Every Thursday they marched in front of government buildings wearing headscarves embroidered with the names of their lost children. Through sewing, they found a way to campaign. In Tudor England Mary, Queen of Scots was under house arrest and her letters were censored, so she sewed secret treason into her needlework to communicate with the world outside. From the political propaganda of the Bayeux Tapestry and First World War soldiers with PTSD, to the maps sewn by schoolgirls in the New World, Threads of Life stretches from medieval France to contemporary Mexico, from a POW camp in Singapore to a family attic in Scotland. It is a chronicle of identity, protest, memory, power and politics told through the stories of the men and women, over centuries and across continents, who have used the language of sewing to make their voices heard, even in the most desperate of circumstances.In an eloquent blend of history and memoir, Threads of Life is an evocative and moving book about the need we all have to tell our story.

Hodder Paperbacks

The Blink of an Eye

Rikke Schmidt Kjærgaard
Authors:
Rikke Schmidt Kjærgaard

With a foreword by Bill Bryson'A wonderful meditation on the human condition and a testament to the power of love'Max Pemberton, columnist and author of Trust Me, I'm a (Junior) Doctor 'As gripping as a thriller'Daily Express* * *At the age of 38, Rikke Schmidt Kjaergaard, a Danish scientist, wife and mother of three, is struck down by an acute bout of bacterial meningitis. She awakes from a coma in intensive care to find herself completely paralysed, unable to show she is conscious except by blinking her eye. It becomes her only form of communication as in the months that follow, Kjaergaard's husband Peter sits beside her helping to interpret every eye movement. She struggles with every basic of life - painfully learning how to breathe, move, eat and speak again. Despite being given a five per cent chance of survival, she works intensively to recover and achieve every small breakthrough. The Blink of an Eye is a celebration of love and family and every little thing that matters when life is in the balance - written by a scientist uniquely able to describe her physical and mental journey to recovery.

Hodder Paperbacks

Tall Order

Stephen Leather
Authors:
Stephen Leather
Two Roads

The Arab of the Future 3

Riad Sattouf
Authors:
Riad Sattouf
Hodder & Stoughton

Blowing the Bloody Doors Off

Michael Caine
Authors:
Michael Caine
Hodder & Stoughton

Best Foot Forward

Adam Hills
Authors:
Adam Hills
Coronet

The Back-Up Plan

Alice Judge-Talbot
Authors:
Alice Judge-Talbot
Hodder & Stoughton

The Ashes: It's All About the Urn

Graeme Swann
Authors:
Graeme Swann

Shortlisted for Cricket Book of the Year at the British Sports Book AwardsGraeme Swann leads us on a compelling adventure through one of world sport's most engrossing rivalries. He knows as much as anybody about the heat of England v Australia battles, having played in three series wins and also the whitewash defeat of 2013-14 when its intensity ended his international career. However, it brought out some of his best displays in Test cricket. But he is just one of dozens of colourful characters to have added their chapters to this great tome. The mock obituary of English cricket in the Sporting Times of 1882 was the forerunner of summers and winters of heaven and hell, depending on which side of the divide you were situated. When it comes to on-field relations nothing quite compares to the over-my-dead-body feel of the Ashes.From Grace to Sir Don, the most graceful of them all. From the foulest play to the fairest - contrast the 1932-33 Bodyline series affair to the image of Andrew Flintoff hunched over a distraught Brett Lee in 2005. From Ray Illingworth's famous walk-off in the Seventies, when an England team-mate was assaulted by a spectator, to Steve Waugh's hugely emotional lap of honour when he retired a quarter of a century later. Swann's book will reveal the magic of a series that first gripped him in his front room in Northampton as an aspiring spin bowler in the mid-1980s.

Two Roads

Natives

Akala
Authors:
Akala

'My book of the year. It's personal, historical, political, and it speaks to where we are now. This is the book I've been waiting for - for years' Benjamin Zephaniah'Powerful ... The kind of disruptive, aggressive intellect that a new generation is closely watching' Afua Hirsch, Observer'Part biography, part polemic, this powerful, wide-ranging study picks apart the British myth of meritocracy' David Olusoga, Guardian'Inspiring' Madani Younis, Guardian'Lucid, wide-ranging' John Kerrigan, TLS'A potent combination of autobiography and political history which holds up a mirror to contemporary Britain' IndependentA searing modern polemic and Sunday Times bestseller from the BAFTA and MOBO award-winning musician and political commentator, Akala.From the first time he was stopped and searched as a child, to the day he realised his mum was white, to his first encounters with racist teachers - race and class have shaped Akala's life and outlook. In this unique book he takes his own experiences and widens them out to look at the social, historical and political factors that have left us where we are today.Covering everything from the police, education and identity to politics, sexual objectification and the far right, Natives will speak directly to British denial and squeamishness when it comes to confronting issues of race and class that are at the heart of the legacy of Britain's racialised empire.'Trenchant and highly persuasive' Metro'A history lesson of the kind you should get in school but don't' Stylist

Two Roads

Girl on the Line

Alice Vinten
Authors:
Alice Vinten

'I loved this book. Gritty and gripping, moving and shocking, this brilliant police memoir shows that life on the force really is different for girls' Erin Kelly, author of He Said, She Said'Compelling ... a portrait of the frontline which will fill you with admiration for those who, like Vinten, daily risk life and limb to keep us safe' Sunday Express 'Extraordinary' Mail on SundayWelcome to London. Population: 8.7million. And it's your job to keep them safe. A no-holds-barred account of life on the front line of policing, On the Line follows PC Alice Hearn throughout ten years in the Met, from rookie to constable. As she deals with violent criminals, heart-breaking domestic situations, petty crime, life, death, and everything in between, she builds up a portrait of a living, complex city, and what it means to look after it.'I've never read such an authentic and interesting account of what it's like to be a female police officer' Louise Voss, author of The Old You'Deeply moving and inspiring' Jane Casey, author of the Maeve Kerrigan series'Alice Vinten is the real deal - all the thrills of a crime novel, only true' Mel McGrath, author of Give Me The Child'Heartbreaking, funny and, most of all, honest' Lisa Cutts, author of Mercy Killing'Compelling, honest and moving' Laura Wilson, author of The Other Woman'Honest, vivid and compelling . . . Superbly written, with the pace of a novel, it offers an illuminating look at the pressures of everyday encounters with brutal, chaotic and tragic lives.' Tom Bale, author of Skin and Bones

Coronet

Angels at My Fingertips: The sequel to Angels in My Hair

Lorna Byrne
Authors:
Lorna Byrne
Two Roads

A Normal Family

Henry Normal
Authors:
Henry Normal
Two Roads

Adventures of a Young Naturalist

David Attenborough
Authors:
David Attenborough