Lucy Worsley - Jane Austen at Home - Hodder & Stoughton

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  • Paperback £9.99
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    • ISBN:9781473632202
    • Publication date:19 Apr 2018
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    • ISBN:9781473632523
    • Publication date:18 May 2017

Jane Austen at Home

A Biography

By Lucy Worsley

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  • £P.O.R.

Historian Lucy Worsley visits Jane Austen at home, exploring the author's life through the places which meant the most to her.

THE SUNDAY TIMES BESTSELLER

'This is my kind of history: carefully researched but so vivid that you are convinced Lucy Worsley was actually there at the party - or the parsonage.' Antonia Fraser

'A refreshingly unique perspective on Austen and her work and a beautifully nuanced exploration of gender, creativity, and domesticity.' Amanda Foreman

On the 200th anniversary of Jane Austen's death, historian Lucy Worsley leads us into the rooms from which our best-loved novelist quietly changed the world.

This new telling of the story of Jane's life shows us how and why she lived as she did, examining the places and spaces that mattered to her. It wasn't all country houses and ballrooms, but a life that was often a painful struggle. Jane famously lived a 'life without incident', but with new research and insights Lucy Worsley reveals a passionate woman who fought for her freedom. A woman who far from being a lonely spinster in fact had at least five marriage prospects, but who in the end refused to settle for anything less than Mr Darcy.

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  • ISBN: 9781473632219
  • Publication date: 18 May 2017
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  • Imprint: Hodder & Stoughton
This is my kind of history: carefully researched but so vivid that you are convinced Lucy Worsley was actually there at the party - or the parsonage. — Antonia Fraser
Jane Austen at Home offers a fascinating look at Jane Austen's world through the lens of the homes in which she lived and worked throughout her life. The result is a refreshingly unique perspective on Austen and her work and a beautifully nuanced exploration of gender, creativity, and domesticity. — Amanda Foreman
A vivid portrait of Jane Austen. A must for any Austenite. — Red magazine
Brilliant and very moving, this book is a fascinating and original exploration of Jane Austen with lots of new material - Worsley brings Austen to life superbly, through her pages she is a flesh and blood woman, intelligent, powerful, contradictory, loving, loved. A magnificent book. — Kate Williams
Rarely, if ever, will you encounter a historian so in command of their material. Truly, this is a dazzling exercise in persuasion, written with sense and sensibility. — Saturday Express
A deep, prolifically researched dive into the houses, vacation homes, and schools where the author spent her life. — Vogue magazine
Worsley offers us much that Austen's admirers wish to know... [she] is entirely convincing. — New York Times
An interesting portrait of Georgian and Regency material culture. There's much intriguing historical detail. — Literary Review
A sprightly new take on Austen's life. — Mail on Sunday
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