- How Numbers Work - Hodder & Stoughton

How Numbers Work

Discover the strange and beautiful world of mathematics

  • E-Book
  • £P.O.R.

How Numbers Work is a tour of the mind-blowing but beautiful realm of numbers and the mathematical rules that connect them.

Think of a number between one and ten.
No, hang on, let's make this interesting. Between zero and infinity. Even if you stick to the whole numbers, there are a lot to choose from - an infinite number in fact. Throw in decimal fractions and infinity suddenly gets an awful lot bigger (is that even possible?) And then there are the negative numbers, the imaginary numbers, the irrational numbers like pi which never end. It literally never ends.

The world of numbers is indeed strange and beautiful. Among its inhabitants are some really notable characters - pi, e, the "imaginary" number i and the famous golden ratio to name just a few. Prime numbers occupy a special status. Zero is very odd indeed: is it a number, or isn't it?

How Numbers Work takes a tour of this mind-blowing but beautiful realm of numbers and the mathematical rules that connect them. Not only that, but take a crash course on the biggest unsolved problems that keep mathematicians up at night, find out about the strange and unexpected ways mathematics influences our everyday lives, and discover the incredible connection between numbers and reality itself.

ABOUT THE SERIES
New Scientist Instant Expert books are definitive and accessible entry points to the most important subjects in science; subjects that challenge, attract debate, invite controversy and engage the most enquiring minds. Designed for curious readers who want to know how things work and why, the Instant Expert series explores the topics that really matter and their impact on individuals, society, and the planet, translating the scientific complexities around us into language that's open to everyone, and putting new ideas and discoveries into perspective and context.

Biographical Notes

Since the first magazine was published in 1956, New Scientist has established a world-beating reputation for exploring and uncovering the latest developments and discoveries in science and technology, placing them in context and exploring what they mean for the future. Each week through a variety of different channels, including print, online, social media and more, New Scientist reaches over four million highly engaged readers - over a million readers for the print magazine alone.

  • Other details

  • ISBN: 9781473629752
  • Publication date: 21 Mar 2018
  • Page count:
  • Imprint: John Murray Learning
Coronet

Ways to Go Beyond and Why They Work

Rupert Sheldrake
Authors:
Rupert Sheldrake

To go beyond is to move into a higher state of consciousness, to a place of bliss, greater understanding, love, and deep connectedness, a realm where we finally find life's meaning - experiences for which all spiritual seekers seek.Dr Rupert Sheldrake, writing as both a scientist and a spiritual explorer, looks at seven spiritual practices that are personally transformative and have scientifically measurable effects. He combines the latest scientific research with his extensive knowledge of mystical traditions around the world to show how we may tune into more-than-human realms of consciousness through psychedelics, such as ayahuasca, and by taking cannabis. He also shows how everyday activities can have mystical dimensions, including sports and learning from animals. He discusses traditional religious practices such as fasting, prayer, and the celebration of festivals and holy days.Why do these practices work? Are their effects all inside brains and essentially illusory? Or can we really make contact with forms of consciousness greater than our own? We are in the midst of a spiritual revival. This book is an essential guide.

Hodder & Stoughton

Say Why to Drugs

Suzi Gage
Authors:
Suzi Gage

A definitive and authoritative guide to drugs and why we get high from the creator of the top-rated podcast, Say Why to Drugs.Drugs. We've all done them. Whether it's a cup of coffee or a glass of wine, a cigarette or a sleeping pill. But how well do we understand the effects of the drugs we take - legal or illegal?Say Why to Drugs investigates the science behind recreational drugs- debunking common myths and misconceptions, as well as containing the most recent scientific research. Looking at a range of drugs, this book provides a clear understanding of how drugs work and what they're really doing to your mind and body. Along the way you will find out why ketamine is on the WHO's list of essential medicines, why some researchers hope MDMA could treat PTSD, and much more.Enlightening, entertaining, and thought-provoking, Say Why to Drugs is a compelling read that will surprise and educate proponents on both sides of the drugs debate.

John Murray

Action Intelligence

Scott Grafton
Authors:
Scott Grafton

Hodder & Stoughton

A Theory of Everything (that Matters)

Alister McGrath
Authors:
Alister McGrath
Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Your Brain, Explained

Marc Dingman
Authors:
Marc Dingman

Sleep. Memory. Pleasure. Fear. Language. We experience these things almost every day, but how do our brains create them? Your Brain, Explained is a personal tour around your grey matter. Neuroscientist Marc Dingman gives you a crash course in what goes on in your brain and explains the latest research on the brain functions (and malfunctions) that affect you on a daily basis. You'll also discover what happens when these systems don't work the way they should, causing problems such as insomnia, ADHD, depression or addiction, how neuroscience is working to fix these problems, and how you can build up your defences against the most common faults of the mind.Along the way you'll find out: ·Why brain training games don't prevent dementia (and what does)· What it's like to remember every day of your life as if it were yesterday· Which mental ailment used to be treated with German rocket fuel· What triggers sleep loss, or lapses in concentrationDrawing on the author's popular YouTube series, 2-minute Neuroscience, this is a friendly, engaging introduction to the human brain and its quirks from the perspective of a neuroscientist - using eye-opening illustrations and real-life examples. Your brain is yours to discover.

John Murray

How To

Randall Munroe
Authors:
Randall Munroe
John Murray Learning

Maths Unwrapped

Mattias Ribbing, Per Sundin
Authors:
Mattias Ribbing, Per Sundin
Sceptre

The Consolations of Physics

Tim Radford
Authors:
Tim Radford
John Murray

How to Be Human

If you thought you knew who you were, THINK AGAIN.Did you know that half your DNA isn't human? That somebody, somewhere has exactly the same face? Or that most of your memories are fiction?What about the fact that you are as hairy as a chimpanzee, various parts of your body don't belong to you, or that you can read other people's minds? Do you really know why you blush, yawn and cry? Why 90 per cent of laughter has nothing to do with humour? Or what will happen to your mind after you die? You belong to a unique, fascinating and often misunderstood species. How to be Human is your guide to making the most of it.

John Murray

Brief Answers to the Big Questions

Stephen Hawking
Authors:
Stephen Hawking
Hodder & Stoughton

The Skeptics' Guide to the Universe

Steven Novella
Authors:
Steven Novella
John Murray

The Brain

Teach Yourself

Mathematics: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson
Authors:
Hugh Neill, Trevor Johnson

Maths does not have to be difficult. This book, complete with exercises and answers, forms a course which will take you from beginner or intermediate level to being a confident mathematician. This book includes: simple step-by-step explanations, to help you grasp new topics or those that have previously confused you; practice questions throughout, to help you embed your learning and improve your confidence; and end of chapter summaries, to help you remember the key points you've learned - all in one great-value book, so you don't need any separate workbooks or coursebooks.Chapters include: number; angles; fractions; two-dimensional shapes; decimals; statisticsl directed numbers; graphs; measurement; perimeter and area; algebraic expressions; approximations; equations; percentages; formulae; circles; probability; three-dimensional shapes; ratio and proportion; pythagoras' theorem and trigonometry; indices and standard form.ABOUT THE SERIESThe Complete Introduction series from Teach Yourself is the ultimate one-stop guide for anyone wanting a comprehensive and accessible entry point into subjects as diverse as philosophy, mathematics, psychology, Shakespeare and practical electronics. Loved by students and perfect for general readers who simply want to learn more about the world around them, these books are your first choice for discovering something new.

Teach Yourself

Calculus: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill

Calculus: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to using calculus. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all areas of calculus, including functions, gradients, rates of change, differentiation, exponential and logarithmic functions and integration. Everything you will need to know is here in one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

Teach Yourself

Trigonometry: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill

Trigonometry: A Complete Introduction is the most comprehensive yet easy-to-use introduction to Trigonometry. Written by a leading expert, this book will help you if you are studying for an important exam or essay, or if you simply want to improve your knowledge. The book covers all areas of trigonometry including the theory and equations of tangent, sine and cosine, using trigonometry in three dimensions and for angles of any magnitude, and applications of trigonometry including radians, ratio, compound angles and circles related to triangles. Everything you will need is here in this one book. Each chapter includes not only an explanation of the knowledge and skills you need, but also worked examples and test questions.

John Murray

What is Real?

Adam Becker
Authors:
Adam Becker

Every physicist agrees quantum mechanics is among humanity's finest scientific achievements. But ask what it means, and the result will be a brawl. For a century, most physicists have followed Niels Bohr's Copenhagen interpretation and dismissed questions about the reality underlying quantum physics as meaningless. A mishmash of solipsism and poor reasoning, Copenhagen endured, as Bohr's students vigorously protected his legacy, and the physics community favoured practical experiments over philosophical arguments. As a result, questioning the status quo long meant professional ruin. And yet, from the 1920s to today, physicists like John Bell, David Bohm, and Hugh Everett persisted in seeking the true meaning of quantum mechanics. What is Real? is the gripping story of this battle of ideas and the courageous scientists who dared to stand up for truth.

Teach Yourself

Algebra: A Complete Introduction

Hugh Neill
Authors:
Hugh Neill
John Murray

Bad Choices

Ali Almossawi
Authors:
Ali Almossawi

A relatable, interactive, and funny exploration of algorithms, those essential building blocks of computer science - and of everyday life - from the author of the wildly popular Bad Arguments.Algorithms -- processes that are made up of unambiguous steps and do something useful -- make up the very foundations of computer science. Yet, they also inform our choices in approaching everyday tasks, from managing a pile of clothes fresh out of the dryer to deciding what music to listen to.With Bad Choices, Ali Almossawi, presents twelve scenes from everyday life that help demonstrate and demystify the fundamental algorithms that drive computer science, bringing these seemingly elusive concepts into the understandable realms of the everyday.Readers will discover how:· Matching socks can teach you about search and hash tables· Planning trips to the store can demonstrate the value of stacks· Deciding what music to listen to shows why link analysis is all-important· Crafting a succinct Tweet draws on ideas from compression· Making your way through a grocery list helps explain priority queues and traversing graphs · And moreAs you better understand algorithms, you'll also discover what makes a method faster and more efficient, helping you become a more nimble, creative problem-solver, ready to face new challenges. Bad Choices will open the world of algorithms to all readers making this a perennial go-to for fans of quirky, accessible science books.

Nicholas Brealey Publishing

Mission Control Management

Paul Sean Hill
Authors:
Paul Sean Hill

Failure is always an option...For more than 50 years, NASA's Mission Control has been known for two things: perfect decision making in extreme situations and producing generations of steely-eyed missile men and women who continue that tradition. A key to that legacy of brilliant performance is a particular brand of leadership, especially at the working level in Mission Control.Take the ultimate insiders look at the leadership values and culture that created the best team on this planet. Paul Sean Hill was responsible for NASA's Mission Operations support for manned space flight from 2007-2011. In this candid book he shows that the secret to Mission Control's success has never been rocket science and that the real practice of perfect decision making can be applied to any organisation or team. By demonstrating how his Mission Control team nurtured a culture which has delivered impossible wins for decades, Hill provides a guide for all leaders to boost their company's performance at all levels.Whether failure means cost and schedule overruns, quality reduction, loss of market share, bankruptcy - or putting someone's life a risk, how we lead can determine whether even small mistakes are dealt with or are left to snowball out of control and destroy an enterprise. Discover how to take leadership from the Mission Control Room to your boardroom and beyond, and achieve this out-of-this-world leadership environment in your team.

John Murray

New Scientist: The Origin of (almost) Everything

Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel
Contributors:
Stephen Hawking, Graham Lawton, Jennifer Daniel

Introduction by Professor Stephen Hawking.When Edwin Hubble looked into his telescope in the 1920s, he was shocked to find that nearly all of the galaxies he could see through it were flying away from one another. If these galaxies had always been travelling, he reasoned, then they must, at some point, have been on top of one another. This discovery transformed the debate about one of the most fundamental questions of human existence - how did the universe begin?Every society has stories about the origin of the cosmos and its inhabitants, but now, with the power to peer into the early universe and deploy the knowledge gleaned from archaeology, geology, evolutionary biology and cosmology, we are closer than ever to understanding where it all came from. In The Origin of (almost) Everything, New Scientist explores the modern origin stories of everything from the Big Bang, meteorites and dark energy, to dinosaurs, civilisation, timekeeping, belly-button fluff and beyond.From how complex life evolved on Earth, to the first written language, to how humans conquered space, The Origin of (almost) Everything offers a unique history of the past, present and future of our universe.